guide vs maneuver what difference

what is difference between guide and maneuver

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡaɪd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪd

Etymology 1

c. 1325–75. From Middle English guide, from the Old French guide, from Old Occitan guida, from guidar, from Frankish *wītan (to show the way, lead), from Proto-Germanic *wītaną (to see, know; go, depart), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, know). Cognate with Old English wītan (to see, take heed to, watch after, guard, keep). Related also to English wit.

Noun

guide (plural guides)

  1. Someone who guides, especially someone hired to show people around a place or an institution and offer information and explanation.
    The guide led us around the museum and explained the exhibits.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Psalms xlviii. 14
      He will be our guide, even unto death.
  2. A document or book that offers information or instruction; guidebook.
  3. A sign that guides people; guidepost.
  4. Any marking or object that catches the eye to provide quick reference.
  5. A device that guides part of a machine, or guides motion or action.
    1. A blade or channel for directing the flow of water to the buckets in a water wheel.
    2. A grooved director for a probe or knife in surgery.
    3. (printing, dated) A strip or device to direct the compositor’s eye to the line of copy being set.
  6. (occult) A spirit believed to speak through a medium.
  7. (military) A member of a group marching in formation who sets the pattern of movement or alignment for the rest.
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English guiden, from Old French guider, from Old Occitan guidar, from Frankish *wītan (to show the way, lead), from Proto-Germanic *wītaną (to see, know; go, depart), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, know).

Verb

guide (third-person singular simple present guides, present participle guiding, simple past and past participle guided)

  1. to serve as a guide for someone or something; to lead or direct in a way; to conduct in a course or path.
  2. to steer or navigate, especially a ship or as a pilot.
  3. to exert control or influence over someone or something.
  4. to supervise the education or training of someone.
  5. (intransitive) to act as a guide.
Derived terms
  • guidee
Translations

References

  • guide on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • “guide”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 2000, →ISBN.
  • “guide” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “guide” in WordNet 2.0, Princeton University, 2003.

Anagrams

  • digue, iudge

French

Etymology

From Old French guide, borrowed from Old Occitan guida, from the verb guidar, ultimately of Germanic origin, possibly through Medieval Latin; cf. Frankish *wītan. Supplanted the older Old French guier, of the same origin. Compare Italian guida, Spanish guía. See guider for more information.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡid/
  • Homophone: guides
  • Rhymes: -id

Noun

guide m (plural guides)

  1. guide person
  2. guidebook, or set itinerary.

Derived terms

  • chien guide d’aveugle
  • guide de conversation
  • mener la vie à grandes guides

Related terms

  • guider

Descendants

  • Danish: guide
  • Romanian: ghid
  • Russian: гид (gid)

References

  • “guide” in the WordReference Dictionnaire Français-Anglais, WordReference.com LLC, 2006.

Further reading

  • “guide” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • digue

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡwi.de/
  • Rhymes: -ide

Noun

guide f

  1. plural of guida

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from English guide.

Noun

guide m (definite singular guiden, indefinite plural guider, definite plural guidene)

  1. a guide (person who guides tourists)
  2. a guide (handbook, e.g. for tourists)

Alternative forms

  • gaid

Verb

guide (imperative guid, present tense guider, passive guides, simple past and past participle guida or guidet, present participle guidende)

  1. to guide (usually tourists)

Alternative forms

  • gaide

References

  • “guide” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “guide_1” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).
  • “guide_2” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from English guide.

Noun

guide m (definite singular guiden, indefinite plural guidar, definite plural guidane)

  1. a guide (person who guides tourists)
  2. a guide (handbook, e.g. for tourists)

Alternative forms

  • gaid

Verb

guide (present tense guidar, past tense guida, past participle guida, passive infinitive guidast, present participle guidande, imperative guid)

  1. to guide (usually tourists)

Alternative forms

  • gaide, guida

References

  • “guide” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Noun

guide m or f

  1. a guide (person who guides)

Descendants

  • French: guide
    • Danish: guide
    • Romanian: ghid
    • Russian: гид (gid)
  • Norman: dgide (Jersey)
  • Middle English: giden, gide
    • Scots: guide
    • English: guide
      • Korean: 가이드 (gaideu)
      • Japanese: ガイド (gaido)
      • Norwegian: guide
      • Swedish: guide

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *gʷodyā, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰodʰ-yeh₂.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡuðʲe]

Noun

guide f (genitive guide, nominative plural guidi)

  1. verbal noun of guidid
  2. prayer
    • c. 808, Félire Oengusso, published in Félire Óengusso Céli Dé: The Martyrology of Oengus the Culdee (1905, Harrison & Sons), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes, Epilogue, line 421

Declension

Descendants

  • Irish: guí
  • Manx: gwee (curse, imprecation)
  • Scottish Gaelic: guidhe

Mutation


Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

guide c

  1. guide (person who guides)
    Synonym: vägledare
  2. (computing) wizard (program or script used to simplify complex operations)
    Synonym: assistent

Declension


English

Alternative forms

  • manoeuvre (Commonwealth, Irish)
  • maneuvre, manoeuver (nonstandard)
  • manœuver, manœuvre (British, archaic)

Etymology

From Middle French manœuvre (manipulation, maneuver) and manouvrer (to maneuver), from Old French manovre (handwork, manual labor), from Medieval Latin manopera, manuopera (work done by hand, handwork), from manu (by hand) + operari (to work). First recorded in the Capitularies of Charlemagne (800 AD) to mean “chore, manual task”, probably as a calque of the Frankish *handwerc (hand-work). Compare Old English handweorc, Old English handġeweorc, German Handwerk. The verb is a doublet of the verb manure.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /məˈnuːvɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /məˈnuːvə/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧neu‧ver
  • Rhymes: -uːvə(ɹ)

Noun

maneuver (plural maneuvers) (American spelling)

  1. (military) The planned movement of troops, vehicles etc.; a strategic repositioning; (later also) a large training field-exercise of fighting units. [from 18th c.]
    The army was on maneuvers.
    Joint NATO maneuvers are as much an exercise in diplomacy as in tactics and logistics.
  2. Any strategic or cunning action; a stratagem. [from 18th c.]
    • 1782, Frances Burney, Cecilia, III.v.7:
      “This,” cried he, “is a manœuvre I have been some time expecting: but Mr. Harrel, though artful and selfish, is by no means deep.”
  3. A movement of the body, or with an implement, instrument etc., especially one performed with skill or dexterity. [from 18th c.]
  4. (medicine) A specific medical or surgical movement, often eponymous, done with the doctor’s hands or surgical instruments. [from 18th c.]
    The otorhinolaryngologist performed an Epley maneuver and the patient was relieved of his vertigo.
  5. A controlled (especially skilful) movement taken while steering a vehicle. [from 18th c.]
    Parallel parking can be a difficult maneuver.

Translations

Verb

maneuver (third-person singular simple present maneuvers, present participle maneuvering, simple past and past participle maneuvered) (American spelling)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To move (something, or oneself) carefully, and often with difficulty, into a certain position.
  2. (figuratively, transitive) To guide, steer, manage purposefully
  3. (figuratively, intransitive) To intrigue, manipulate, plot, scheme
    The patriarch maneuvered till his offspring occupied countless key posts

Translations

Anagrams

  • maneuvre

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