guise vs pretense what difference

what is difference between guise and pretense

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡaɪz/
  • Rhymes: -aɪz
  • Homophone: guys

Etymology 1

From Middle English guise, gise, gyse, from Old French guisse, guise, vise (guise, manner, way), from Old Frankish *wīsa (manner, way, fashion), from Proto-Germanic *wīsǭ (manner, way), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, view, behold, perceive). Cognate with Old High German wīsa (way, manner), Old English wīse (wise, way, fashion, custom, habit, manner), Dutch wijze (manner, way). More at wise.

Noun

guise (plural guises)

  1. Customary way of speaking or acting; fashion, manner, practice (often used formerly in such phrases as “at his own guise”; that is, in his own fashion, to suit himself.)
    • 1924, Aristotle. Metaphysics. Translated by W. D. Ross. Nashotah, Wisconsin, USA: The Classical Library, 2001. Aristotle. Metaphysics. Book 1, Part 5.
      dialecticians and sophists assume the same guise as the philosopher
  2. External appearance in manner or dress; appropriate indication or expression; garb; shape.
  3. Misleading appearance; cover, cloak.
    Under the guise of patriotism
    • 2013, Russell Brand, Russell Brand and the GQ awards: ‘It’s amazing how absurd it seems’ (in The Guardian, 13 September 2013)[1]
      Ought we be concerned that our rights to protest are being continually eroded under the guise of enhancing our safety?
Synonyms
  • (customary way of acting): See Thesaurus:conduct
  • (external appearance): See Thesaurus:guise
Related terms
  • disguise
Translations

Verb

guise (third-person singular simple present guises, present participle guising, simple past and past participle guised)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To dress.
  2. (archaic, intransitive) To act as a guiser; to go dressed up in a parade etc.

Etymology 2

Noun

guise pl (plural only)

  1. (Internet slang) Deliberate misspelling of guys.
    Sup guise? — What’s up, guys?

Anagrams

  • Segui, egusi

French

Etymology

From Middle French guise, from Old French guisse, guise, vise (guise, manner, way), from Old Frankish *wīsa (manner, way, fashion), from Proto-Germanic *wīsǭ (manner, way), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, view, behold, perceive). Cognate with Old High German wīsa (way, manner), Old English wīse (wise, way, fashion, custom, habit, manner). More at wise.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡiz/

Noun

guise f (plural guises)

  1. way
    le faire à ma guise — do it my way
    Je l’ai laissé chanter à sa guise. — I let him sing his way.
    en guise de — by way of, as

Derived terms

  • en guise de

Further reading

  • “guise” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Noun

guise f

  1. plural of guisa

Anagrams

  • segui, seguì

Old French

Noun

guise f (oblique plural guises, nominative singular guise, nominative plural guises)

  1. way; manner

Descendants

  • English: guise
  • French: guise

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (guise, supplement)

Spanish

Verb

guise

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of guisar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of guisar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of guisar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of guisar.


English

Alternative forms

  • pretence (Only correct spelling in the UK, the Republic of Ireland, and Commonwealth countries and historical use in the United States)
  • prætense (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French pretensse, from Late Latin praetēnsus, past participle of Latin praetendō (to pretend), from prae- (before) + tendō (to stretch); see pretend.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɹiːtɛns/
  • Hyphenation: pre‧tense

Noun

pretense (countable and uncountable, plural pretenses) (American spelling)

  1. (US) A false or hypocritical profession
  2. Intention or purpose not real but professed.
    with only a pretense of accuracy
  3. An unsupported claim made or implied.
  4. An insincere attempt to reach a specific condition or quality.

Synonyms

  • affectation denotes deception for the sake of escape from punishment or an awkward situation
  • false pretense
  • fiction
  • imitation
  • pretext
  • sham
  • subterfuge
  • See also Thesaurus:pretext

Related terms

  • pretend
  • pretender
  • pretension
  • pretentious
  • pretentiousness

Translations

Further reading

  • pretense in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • pretense in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • pretense at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Petersen, pre-teens, preteens, terpenes

Spanish

Verb

pretense

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of pretensar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of pretensar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of pretensar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of pretensar.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial