gum vs mumble what difference

what is difference between gum and mumble

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gŭm, IPA(key): /ɡʌm/
  • Rhymes: -ʌm

Etymology 1

From Middle English gome, from Old English gōma (palate), from Proto-Germanic *gōmô, *gaumô (palate) (compare German Gaumen, Old Norse gómr (whence Icelandic gómur)), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰh₂u-mo- (compare Tocharian A ko, Tocharian B koyṃ (mouth), Lithuanian gomurỹs (palate)), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₂w- (to gape, yawn). More at yawn.

Noun

gum (plural gums)

  1. (often in the plural) The flesh around the teeth.
Synonyms
  • gingiva (medical)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

gum (third-person singular simple present gums, present participle gumming, simple past and past participle gummed)

  1. To chew, especially of a toothless person or animal.
  2. (transitive) To deepen and enlarge the spaces between the teeth of (a worn saw), as with a gummer.

Etymology 2

From Middle English gomme, gumme, borrowed from Anglo-Norman gome, from Late Latin gumma, from Latin cummi, gummi, from Ancient Greek κόμμι (kómmi), from Egyptian qmy (anointing oil), qmyt (acanthus resin, gum). Cognate with Spanish goma (rubber).

Noun

gum (countable and uncountable, plural gums)

  1. (chiefly uncountable) Any of various viscous or sticky substances that are exuded by certain plants.
  2. (chiefly uncountable) Any viscous or sticky substance resembling those that are exuded by certain plants.
  3. (chiefly uncountable) Chewing gum.
  4. (countable) A single piece of chewing gum.
  5. (South Africa, often in the plural) A gummi candy.
  6. (US, dialect, Southern US) A hive made of a section of a hollow gum tree; hence, any roughly made hive.
  7. (US, dialect, Southern US) A vessel or bin made from a hollow log.
  8. (US, dialect) A rubber overshoe.
  9. A gum tree.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

gum (third-person singular simple present gums, present participle gumming, simple past and past participle gummed)

  1. (sometimes with up) To apply an adhesive or gum to; to make sticky by applying a sticky substance to.
  2. To stiffen with glue or gum.
  3. (sometimes with together) To inelegantly attach into a sequence.
  4. (colloquial, with up) To impair the functioning of a thing or process.
    That cheap oil will gum up the engine valves.
    The new editor can gum up your article with too many commas.

Derived terms

  • gum up
  • by gum

Anagrams

  • MGU, mug

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡum/
  • Rhymes: -um

Noun

gum

  1. genitive plural of guma

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • gom (dated in the meaning “eraser”).

Etymology

A relatively recent variant of gom.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣʏm/
  • Hyphenation: gum

Noun

gum m (plural gummen, diminutive gummetje n)

  1. An eraser.

Derived terms

  • gummen
  • kneedgum

Hausa

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡùm/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [ɡʷʊ̀m]

Ideophone

gùm

  1. smelling bad

Alternative forms

  • sùm

Icelandic

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *gaumō (attention, heed)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʏːm/
  • Rhymes: -ʏːm

Noun

gum n (genitive singular gums, no plural)

  1. boasting, exaggeration
    Synonyms: gort, raup

Declension

Derived terms

  • guma (to boast, to exaggerate)

References


Middle English

Noun

gum

  1. Alternative form of gumme

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡum/

Noun

gum f pl

  1. genitive plural of guma

Scots

Etymology 1

From English gum.

Noun

gum (plural gums)

  1. gum

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain; perhaps a specialised use of Etymology 1, above.

Alternative forms

  • gumm

Noun

gum (plural gums)

  1. mist, vapour, haze

Scottish Gaelic

Alternative forms

  • gu
  • gun

Conjunction

gum

  1. that
    Tha mi cinnteach gum biodh e toilichte. – I’m certain that he would be happy.

Usage notes

  • Used before b, f, m and p.

Sumerian

Romanization

gum

  1. Romanization of ???? (gum)

Turkmen

Noun

gum (definite accusative ?, plural ?)

  1. sand

Zazaki

Noun

gum ?

  1. (anatomy) cheek


English

Etymology

From Middle English momelen, a frequentative of mum (sense 3) (silent). Compare German mümmeln, Middle Dutch mommelen and Dutch mompelen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmʌmbəl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmbəl

Verb

mumble (third-person singular simple present mumbles, present participle mumbling, simple past and past participle mumbled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To speak unintelligibly or inaudibly; to fail to articulate.
    • 1680, Thomas Otway, The Orphan
      A wrinkled hag, with age grown double, / Picking dry sticks, and mumbling to herself.
  2. To chew something gently with closed lips.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:mutter

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

mumble (plural mumbles)

  1. A quiet or unintelligible vocalization; a low tone of voice.

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • bummle

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