gumbo vs okra what difference

what is difference between gumbo and okra

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Louisiana French gombo, ultimately from Kimbundu (k)ingombo (okra); compare Portuguese quingombó.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ʌmbəʊ

Noun

gumbo (countable and uncountable, plural gumbos)

  1. (countable) Synonym of okra: the plant or its edible capsules.
  2. (uncountable) A soup or stew made with okra.
  3. (uncountable) A fine silty soil that when wet becomes very thick and heavy.
    • 1909, Ralph Connor, The Foreigner, ch. 11:
      The team stuck fast in the black muck, and every effort to extricate them served only to imbed them more hopelessly in the sticky gumbo.
    • 1914 April, “Making Good Roads by Firing Poor Ones,” Popular Mechanics, p. 567:
      There are no poorer roads in all the United States than the “gumbo” roads of the south—gumbo being the name give a certain kind of mud or clay that is particularly sticky, clings tenaciously, seems to have no bottom, and will not support any weight.
    • 1950 July 3, “Labor: Trouble at Lowland,” Time:
      The red gumbo soil uttered ugly sucking sounds at the touch of a man’s boot.

References


Kalanga

Noun

gumbo

  1.  (anatomy) foot

Pali

Alternative forms

Noun

gumbo

  1. nominative singular of gumba (swarm)


English

Alternative forms

  • okry (Southern US vern.); ochro, ochroe (Caribbean); okro
  • (obsolete): ochre, ockro, ocra, ocro, occra, occro, ochra, ocre, okero, okwa, ookroo

Etymology

From an unknown West African language, probably Igbo ọ́kụ̀rụ̀ but cf. Akan ŋkrũmã and ŋkrakra (broth).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈəʊkɹə/, /ˈɒkɹə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈoʊkɹə/
  • Rhymes: -əʊkɹə, -ɒkɹə

Noun

okra (countable and uncountable, plural okras)

  1. The edible immature mucilaginous seed pod (properly, capsule) of the Abelmoschus esculentus.
    • 1679, Thomas Trapham, A Discourse of the State of Health in the Island of Jamaica…, pp. 59–60:
      …as a food easy of digestion may well be admitted likewise the young Ocra an agreeable Food as well for the species as individual, dressed variously according to pleasure…
    • 1940, Farmers’ Bulletin, No. 232, p. 7:
      Select young okra, wash thoroughly, remove the stems, and wipe the okra dry.
    • 1997, Lisette Verlander & al., The Cookin’ Cajun Cooking School Cookbook, p. 25:
      Wash and dry okra, remove stems, and slice in one-inch rounds. (If using frozen okra, do not wash.) Heat two tablespoons oil in a heavy saucepan other than black iron. Saute okra in oil and vinegar, stirring often until ropiness is gone.
    • 2006, Francis N. Wiltz, In the Kitchen with Papa Wiltz, p. 1:
      I hated cooking okra because it was so slimy when you first start.
  2. The flowering mallow plant Abelmoschus esculentus itself, now commonly grown in the tropics and warmer parts of the temperate zones.
    • 1707, Hans Sloane, A Voyage to the Islands Madera, Barbados…, Vol. I, p. 222:
      Ocra, this has a round green stem, which rises straight up to ten or twelve foot high.
    • 1989, Ib Libner Nonnecke, Vegetable Production, p. 610:
      Okra does not do well in tight, waterlogged soils, but will tolerate a soil pH range of from 6.0 to 7.5.
    • 2011, Leon Neel & al., The Art of Managing Longleaf: A Personal History of the Stoddard-Neel Approach, p. 36:
      We planted some truck crops like watermelons and okra, which was risky.

Hypernyms

  • (edible capsules): pod vegetable
  • (plant): abelmosk, mallow

Synonyms

  • bhindi (Indian contexts), gumbo (esp. in stews), ladyfinger
  • (edible capsules): ladies’ fingers

Derived terms

  • African okra
  • autumnal okra
  • bun okra (Urena lobata)
  • bush okra (Corchorus olitorius)
  • Chinese okra (Luffa acutangula)
  • Indian okra
  • musk okra (Abelmoschus moschatus)
  • ornamental okra (Abelmoschus moschatus)
  • West African okra (Abelmoschus caillei)
  • wild okra
  • Yorka okra (Abelmoschus moschatus)
  • Okra mosaic virus

Translations

References

  • Abelmoschus esculentus on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • “okra, n.”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Anagrams

  • Kora, akro-, kora

Asi

Noun

okra

  1. okra (Abelmoschus esculentus)

Bikol Central

Etymology

From English okra, probably from Igbo ọkụrụ.

Noun

okra

  1. okra (Abelmoschus esculentus)

Cebuano

Etymology

From English okra, probably from Igbo ọkụrụ.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ok‧ra

Noun

okra

  1. okra (Abelmoschus esculentus)
  2. the pods of this plant

Anagrams

  • arko, karo, orka

Chavacano

Noun

okra

  1. okra

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

okra m (plural okra’s, diminutive [please provide])

  1. okra

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈokrɑ/, [ˈo̞krɑ]
  • Rhymes: -okrɑ
  • Syllabification: ok‧ra

Etymology 1

From Swedish ockra, from Latin ōchra, from Ancient Greek ὤχρα (ṓkhra).

Adjective

okra

  1. ochre (having a yellow-orange colour)
Declension
Synonyms
  • okrankeltainen
  • okranvärinen

Noun

okra

  1. ochre (pigment)
  2. ochre (color)
Usage notes

The pigment is usually called keltamulta when used as pigment for house paints, whereas artists and archaeologists seem to prefer okra.

Declension
Synonyms
  • (pigment): keltamulta
  • (color): okrankeltainen, okranväri, okraväri
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From English okra, from some West African language, probably Igbo ọ́kụ̀rụ̀.

Noun

okra

  1. okra, Abelmoschus esculentus
Declension

Anagrams

  • akro-, rako

Hiligaynon

Noun

okra

  1. okra (Abelmoschus esculentus)

Hungarian

Etymology

ok +‎ -ra

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈokrɒ]
  • Hyphenation: ok‧ra

Noun

okra

  1. sublative singular of ok

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔːkra/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːkra

Verb

okra (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative okraði, supine okrað)

  1. (intransitive) to practice usury

Declension

Anagrams

  • orka

Spanish

Noun

okra f (plural okras)

  1. okra

Tagalog

Noun

okra

  1. okra

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