gun vs torpedo what difference

what is difference between gun and torpedo

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English gunne, gonne, from Lady Gunilda, a huge crossbow with a powerful shot, with the second part of the term being of Old Norse origin. It was later used to denote firearms. The name Gunnhildr and its multiple variations are derived from Old Norse gunnr (battle, war) + hildr (battle), which makes it a pleonasm. In the given context the woman’s name means battle maid. See also Hilda, Gunilda, Gunhild, Gunhilda, Gunnhildr.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gŭn, IPA(key): /ɡʌn/
  • Rhymes: -ʌn

Noun

gun (plural guns)

  1. A device for projecting a hard object very forcefully; a firearm or cannon.
    Looking for wild meat to fill his family’s freezer for the winter, the young man quietly raised up his gun at the approaching deer.
    1. A very portable, short firearm, for hand use, which fires bullets or projectiles, such as a handgun, revolver, pistol, or Derringer.
    2. A less portable, long firearm, bullet- or projectile-firing; a rifle, either manual, automatic or semi-automatic; a flintlock, musket or shotgun.
    3. (military) A cannon with relatively long barrel, operating with relatively low angle of fire, and having a high muzzle velocity.
    4. (military) A cannon with a 6-inch/155mm minimum nominal bore diameter and tube length 30 calibers or more. See also: howitzer; mortar.
    5. (figuratively) A firearm or cannon used for saluting or signalling.Wp
      • It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. []. He halted opposite the Privy Gardens, and, with his face turned skywards, listened until the sound of the Tower guns smote again on the ear and dispelled his doubts.
  2. A device operated by a trigger and acting in a manner similar to a firearm.
    1. Any implement designed to fire a projectile from a tube.
    2. A device or tool that projects a substance.
    3. A device or tool that applies something rather than projecting it.
  3. (surfing) A long surfboard designed for surfing big waves (not the same as a longboard, a gun has a pointed nose and is generally a little narrower).
    • 2000, Drew Kampion, surfline.com
      by the winter of 1962, the Brewer Surfboards Hawaii gun was the most in-demand big-wave equipment on the North Shore.
  4. (cellular automata) A pattern that “fires” out other patterns.
    • 2010, Andrew Adamatzky, Game of Life Cellular Automata, p.74:
      Greene’s period-416 2c/5 spaceship gun
  5. (colloquial, metonymically) A person who carries or uses a rifle, shotgun or handgun.
  6. (television) An electron gun.
    • 2012, Brand Fortner, ‎Theodore E. Meyer, Number by Colors (page 202)
      The problem is figuring out how to get the electrons from the red gun to hit only the red phosphors, the electrons from the blue gun to hit only the blue phosphors, and so on.
  7. (colloquial, usually in the plural) The biceps.
  8. (nautical, in the plural) Violent blasts of wind.
  9. (colloquial) An expert.
  10. (Australia, slang) Someone excellent, surpassingly wonderful, or cool.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: gon
Translations

Verb

gun (third-person singular simple present guns, present participle gunning, simple past and past participle gunned)

  1. (with “down”) To shoot someone or something, either literally (with a firearm) or figuratively (such as to put an end to something).
    He gunned down the hitmen.
    The CEO gunned down that idea before we could present it to the board.
  2. To speed something up.
    He gunned the engine.
  3. To offer vigorous support to a person or cause.
    He’s gunning for you.
  4. To seek to attack someone; to take aim at someone.
    He’s been gunning for you ever since you embarrassed him at the party.
  5. To practice fowling or hunting small game; chiefly in participial form: to go gunning.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, prison slang) To masturbate while observing and visible to a corrections officer.
    • 2010, BNA’s Employment Discrimination Report
      [] all inmates participated in such conduct, and [] “the inmates gunned only female staff, not the all-male security staff,” he said.
Derived terms
  • gun down
  • gun it
  • outgun
Translations

Etymology 2

From gunna, from gonna, from going to

Verb

gun

  1. Nonstandard spelling of going to.
    I’m gun go get da gun from da closet.

References

Anagrams

  • GNU, Ngu, UNG, Ung, gnu, nug

Bissa

Noun

gun

  1. night

Cornish

Noun

gun f (plural gonyow)

  1. plain

Dongxiang

Etymology

From Proto-Mongolic *gün, compare Mongolian гүн (gün).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kuŋ/, [kũ(ŋ)]

Adjective

gun

  1. deep

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣʏn/

Verb

gun

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gunnen
  2. imperative of gunnen

Japanese

Romanization

gun

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ぐん

Jingpho

Etymology

Borrowed from Burmese ကုန် (kun)

Noun

gun

  1. goods for sale

References

  • Kurabe, Keita (2016-12-31), “Phonology of Burmese loanwords in Jinghpaw”, in Kyoto University Linguistic Research[2], volume 35, DOI:10.14989/219015, ISSN 1349-7804, pages 91–128

Mandarin

Romanization

gun

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gǔn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gùn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Manx

Noun

gun m (genitive singular gunney, plural gunnaghyn)

  1. Alternative form of gunn

Middle English

Noun

gun

  1. Alternative form of gunne

Northern Kurdish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ʊn

Noun

gun m

  1. testicle, ball, bollock, egg, nut, orchis, testis

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology 1

From Old Irish co.

Alternative forms

  • gu
  • gum

Conjunction

gun

  1. that
    an t-amadan sin gun do thagh thu – That fool that you voted for
    am fear gum pòs aig an deireadh na mìosa – that man that will marry at the end of the month
    an taigh gu bheil aice – that house that she has

Etymology 2

From Old Irish cen.

Preposition

gun

  1. without
    gun teagamh – without a doubt

Synonyms

  • às aonais

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Conjunction

gun

  1. neither…nor
    • 1911 (Birlinn Limited), Edward Dwelly: The Illustrated Gaelic-English Dictionary:

Usage notes

  • Triggers lenition


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish; numbness, torpidity, electric ray), from torpeō (I am stiff, numb, torpid; I am astounded; I am inactive) +‎ -ēdō (noun suffix), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (stiff).

Cognate with Old English steorfan (to die), Ancient Greek στερεός (stereós, solid), Lithuanian tirpstu (to become rigid), Old Church Slavonic трупети (trupeti).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌtɔː(ɹ)ˈpiː.dəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌtɔɹˈpi.doʊ/
  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do
  • Rhymes: -iːdəʊ

Noun

torpedo (plural torpedoes or torpedos)

  1. An electric ray of the genus Torpedo.
    • 1790, Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Men:
      The man has been changed into an artificial monster by the station in which he is born, and the consequent homage that benumbed his faculties like the torpedo’s touch [] .
  2. (military) A cylindrical explosive projectile that can travel underwater and is used as a weapon.
    1. (science fiction) A similar projectile that can travel through space.
  3. (regional) A submarine sandwich.
  4. (archaic, military) A naval mine.
  5. (obsolete, military) An explosive device buried underground and set off remotely, to destroy fortifications, troops, or cavalry; a land torpedo.
  6. (slang) A professional gunman or assassin.
  7. (rail transport, US) A small explosive device attached to the top of the rail to provide an audible warning when a train passes over it.
  8. A kind of firework in the form of a small ball, or pellet, which explodes when thrown upon a hard object.
  9. An automobile with a torpedo body.
  10. (slang, chiefly US, usually in the plural) A woman’s shoe with a pointed toe. [1910s]
  11. (slang, chiefly US, usually in the plural) A large breast; breast with a large nipple. [from 1960s]
  12. (slang) A marijuana cigarette.
    1. A thick marijuana cigarette. [1940s]
    2. A cigarette containing marijuana and crack cocaine. [from 1980s]

Synonyms

  • (sandwich): see sub
  • (rail transport): detonator (UK)
  • (an explosive underwater projectile): torp (abbreviation), fish

Derived terms

  • torpedo body
  • torpedo roll
  • torpedo stern
  • land torpedo
  • spar torpedo
  • torp (abbreviation)

Related terms

  • torpid

Translations

Verb

torpedo (third-person singular simple present torpedoes, present participle torpedoing, simple past and past participle torpedoed)

  1. To send a torpedo, usually from a submarine, that explodes below the waterline of the target ship.
  2. To sink a ship with one of more torpedoes.
  3. To undermine or destroy any endeavor with a stealthy, powerful attack.

Translations

Anagrams

  • optrode, pet door, toe drop, trooped

Cebuano

Etymology

From English torpedo, borrowed from Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish; numbness, torpidity, electric ray), from torpeō (I am stiff, numb, torpid; I am astounded; I am inactive) +‎ -ēdō (noun suffix), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (stiff).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do

Noun

torpedo

  1. (military) a torpedo; a cylindrical explosive projectile that can travel underwater and is used as a weapon

Dutch

Etymology

From Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish), from torpēdō (numbness, torpidity, electric ray), from torpeō (I am stiff, numb, torpid; I am astounded; I am inactive) and -dō (noun suffix), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (stiff), see also Old English steorfan (to die), Ancient Greek στερεός (stereós, solid), Lithuanian tirpstu (to become rigid), Old Church Slavonic трупети (trupeti)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɔrˈpeː.doː/
  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do

Noun

torpedo f or m (plural torpedo’s, diminutive torpedootje n)

  1. A torpedo (projectile adapted for underwater use).
  2. (dated) A low-lying streamlined car.

Derived terms

  • torpedoboot

Related terms

  • torpederen

Esperanto

Etymology

From English torpedo, Spanish torpedo, German Torpedo; all ultimately from Latin torpedo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /torˈpedo/
  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do
  • Rhymes: -edo

Noun

torpedo (accusative singular torpedon, plural torpedoj, accusative plural torpedojn)

  1. torpedo

Derived terms

  • torpedi

Finnish

Alternative forms

  • torpeedo (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtorpe(ː)do/, [ˈt̪o̞rpe̞(ː)do̞]
  • Rhymes: -orpedo
  • Syllabification: tor‧pe‧do

Noun

torpedo

  1. torpedo (self-propelled cylindrical explosive projectile that can travel underwater)

Declension

Derived terms

  • torpedoida
  • torpedovene

Italian

Noun

torpedo f (invariable)

  1. tourer (motorcar)

See also

  • torpedine

Anagrams

  • deporto, deportò

Latin

Etymology

torpeō (I am stiff or numb) +‎ -ēdō.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /torˈpeː.doː/, [t̪ɔɾˈpeːd̪oː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /torˈpe.do/, [t̪ɔrˈpɛːd̪ɔ]

Noun

torpēdō f (genitive torpēdinis); third declension

  1. lethargy, inertness, sluggishness
  2. torpedo fish

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

References

  • torpedo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • torpedo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • torpedo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin torpedo, via English torpedo or German Torpedo

Noun

torpedo m (definite singular torpedoen, indefinite plural torpedoer, definite plural torpedoene)

  1. a torpedo

Derived terms

  • torpedere

References

  • “torpedo” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin torpedo, via English torpedo or German Torpedo

Noun

torpedo m (definite singular torpedoen, indefinite plural torpedoar, definite plural torpedoane)

  1. a torpedo

Derived terms

  • torpedere

References

  • “torpedo” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish), from torpēdō (numbness, torpidity, electric ray), from torpeō (I am stiff, numb, torpid; I am astounded; I am inactive) and -dō (noun suffix). Compare torpor.

Pronunciation

  • (South Brazil) IPA(key): /toɻ.ˈpe.do/

Noun

torpedo m (plural torpedos)

  1. torpedo (submarine weapon)
  2. (Brazil) SMS (a text message sent on a cell phone)

Related terms

  • torpedagem, torpedear, torpedeamento, torpedeiro

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /torpěːdo/
  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do

Noun

torpédo m (Cyrillic spelling торпе́до)

  1. torpedo

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish).

Pronunciation

Noun

torpedo m (plural torpedos)

  1. torpedo (fish)
    Synonyms: raya torpedo, raya negra, raya eléctrica
  2. torpedo (weapon)

Derived terms

  • lanzatorpedos
  • cazatorpedos
  • torpedear

Further reading

  • “torpedo” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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