gunpowder vs powder what difference

what is difference between gunpowder and powder

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡʌnˌpaʊdə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡʌnˌpaʊdɚ/

Etymology 1

gun +‎ powder

Noun

gunpowder (countable and uncountable, plural gunpowders)

  1. An explosive mixture of saltpetre (potassium nitrate), charcoal and sulphur; formerly used in gunnery but now mostly used in fireworks.
  2. Short for gunpowder tea.
Translations
Derived terms
  • gunpowder chicken
  • gunpowder empire
  • gunpowderish
  • gunpowderous
  • Gunpowder Plot
  • gunpowder tea
  • Gunpowder Treason
  • gunpowdery

See also

  • powder burn

Etymology 2

Possibly due to its smell resembling gunpowder during the British Raj.

Noun

gunpowder (uncountable)

  1. (India, informal) idli podi/milagai podi; ground-up dry spices mixed with oil and ghee and served alongside idli or dosa.

References



English

Alternative forms

  • powdre (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English poudre, pouder, pouldre, borrowed from Old French poudre, poldre, puldre, from Latin pulverem, accusative singular of Latin pulvis (dust, powder). compare pollen fine flour, mill dust, E. pollen. Compare polverine, pulverize.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpaʊ.də(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aʊdə(ɹ)

Noun

powder (countable and uncountable, plural powders)

  1. The fine particles which are the result of reducing dry substance by pounding, grinding, or triturating, or the result of decay; dust.
    • Grind their bones to powder small.
  2. (cosmetics) A mixture of fine dry, sweet-smelling particles applied to the face or other body parts, to reduce shine or to alleviate chaffing.
  3. An explosive mixture used in gunnery, blasting, etc.; gunpowder.
  4. (informal) Ellipsis of powder snow Light, dry, fluffy snow.
  5. Ellipsis of powder blue The colour powder blue.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Tok Pisin: paura
    • Rotokas: paora
  • Hindi: पाउडार (pāuḍār)
  • Maori: paura
  • Urdu: پاؤڈر(pāuḍār)

Translations

Verb

powder (third-person singular simple present powders, present participle powdering, simple past and past participle powdered)

  1. (transitive) To reduce to fine particles; to pound, grind, or rub into a powder.
    • 25 October 2016, Bettina Elias Siegel writing in New York Times, Should the Food Industry Sneak Vegetables Into Food?
      In desperation, they dried fruits and vegetables in an old food dehydrator they had, then used their coffee grinder to powder the produce…
  2. (transitive) To sprinkle with powder, or as if with powder.
    to powder one’s hair
    • 23 March 2016, Seth Augenstein in Laboratory Equipment, FDA Proposes Ban on Powdered Surgical Gloves, Decades after Documenting Health Dangers
      Gloves were powdered for more than a century to allow doctors and surgeons to slip them on more easily.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      A circling zone thou seest / Powdered with stars.
  3. (intransitive) To use powder on the hair or skin.
    • 1778-1787, Frances Burney, The Diary and Letters of Madame D’Arblay
      If she is grave, and reads steadily on, she dismisses me, whether I am dressed or not; but at all times she never forgets to send me away while she is powdering, with a consideration not to spoil my clothes
  4. (intransitive) To turn into powder; to become powdery.
    • 1934, Edward Knight, The Clinical Journal Volume 63
      Ample evidence is brought forward to show that the higher incidence of chronic interstitial nephritis in Queensland is due to lead paint on the verandahs and railings of the houses, which powders easily during the long Australian summer.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To sprinkle with salt; to corn, as meat.
  6. (intransitive, slang) To depart suddenly; to “take a powder”.
    • 1980, Stephen King, The Wedding Gig
      Miss Gibson appeared in the empty hall, her eyes wide and shocked. The little man who had started all the trouble with his singing telegram had powdered.

Synonyms

  • (to reduce to fine particles): pound, grind, comminute, pulverize, triturate

Translations

See also

  • powder on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • powdre, powred, prowed

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French poudre.

Noun

powder

  1. Alternative form of poudre

Etymology 2

From Old French poudrer.

Verb

powder

  1. Alternative form of poudren

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