gush vs jet what difference

what is difference between gush and jet

English

Etymology

From Middle English guschen, gusshen, gosshien, perhaps from Middle Dutch guysen (to flow out with a gurgling sound, gush) or Old Norse gusa (to gush), ultimately imitative.

Compare Old Norse geysa (to gush), German gießen (to pour), Old English ġēotan (“to pour”; > English yote). Related to gust.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡʌʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Noun

gush (plural gushes)

  1. A sudden rapid outflow.
    • 1990, Stephen King, The Moving Finger
      There was a cartoon woman in an apron on the front. She stood with one hand on her hip while she used the other hand to pour a gush of drain-cleaner into something that was either an industrial sink or Orson Welles’s bidet.

Translations

Verb

gush (third-person singular simple present gushes, present participle gushing, simple past and past participle gushed)

  1. (intransitive, also figuratively) To flow forth suddenly, in great volume.
  2. (transitive, also figuratively) To send (something) flowing forth suddenly in great volume.
    • 1993, Brian Lumley, Blood Brothers, Macmillan (→ISBN), page 119:
      The other was no longer capable of controlling his anger; his parasite creature amplified his passion by ten; his jaws cracked open and his great mouth gushed blood from torn gums as teeth grew out of them like bone sickles.
    • 2001, Larry L. Miller, Tennessee Place-names, Indiana University Press (→ISBN), page 196:
      A beautiful spring gushed water from the ground in this mountainous sector of Polk County, inspiring the name of the place.
  3. (intransitive, especially of a woman) To ejaculate during orgasm.
    • 2008, Anya Bast, The Chosen Sin, Penguin (→ISBN), page 154:
      Her orgasm exploded over her, making her writhe and cry out his name. She gushed over his hand, her cunt gripping and releasing his invading fingers.
    • 2009, Emma Holly, Kissing Midnight, Penguin (→ISBN):
      Somehow, this made his ejaculations all the more exciting, sending hot tingles streaking through her as he gushed.
    • 2014, Stewart N. Johnson, Parthian Stranger 2 Conspiracy, Trafford Publishing (→ISBN):
      [] she pulled off an amazing orgasm, one after another, she gushed with force, []
    • 2017, Cara McKinnon, Memories of Magic, Stars and Stone Books (→ISBN):
      Odd. She’d never managed to do that to herself before—to climax so hard she gushed. Sometimes her sex partners didn’t satisfy her as well as she could on her own, but her most intense orgasms had always been with others.
  4. (intransitive, transitive, figuratively) To make an excessive display of enthusiasm, praise, or sentiment.
    • 1911, Thompson Buchanan, Making People Happy, page 14:
      Miss Johnson gushed approval with her usual air of coquettish superiority.
    • 2010, Pat Williams, Jim Denney, How to Be Like Walt: Capturing the Disney Magic Every Day of Your Life, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN):
      Randy Thornton, a producer with Walt Disney Records, put it this way: “Walt was not a man who gushed praise. His biggest words of approval were, ‘That’ll work.’
    • 2017, Judson G. Everitt, Lesson Plans: The Institutional Demands of Becoming a Teacher, Rutgers University Press (→ISBN):
      Nellie routinely gushed praise to students for good performance whereas Frank was much more sparing in praising students.

Translations

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Anagrams

  • Shug, hugs, shug

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *gunša, close to Lithuanian gùžas (knag), Old Norse kjuka (ankle) and Old Church Slavonic gustъ (gustŭ, thick, dense).

Noun

gush f (definite singular gusha)

  1. neck, Adam’s apple

Related terms

  • gungë
  • kungull


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French jet (spurt, literally a throw), from Old French get, giet, from Vulgar Latin *iectus, jectus, from Latin iactus (a throwing, a throw), from iacere (to throw). See abject, ejaculate, gist, jess, jut. Cognate with Spanish echar.

Noun

jet (plural jets)

  1. A collimated stream, spurt or flow of liquid or gas from a pressurized container, an engine, etc.
  2. A spout or nozzle for creating a jet of fluid.
  3. (aviation) A type of airplane using jet engines rather than propellers.
  4. An engine that propels a vehicle using a stream of fluid as propulsion.
    1. A turbine.
    2. A rocket engine.
  5. A part of a carburetor that controls the amount of fuel mixed with the air.
  6. (physics) A narrow cone of hadrons and other particles produced by the hadronization of a quark or gluon.
  7. (dated) Drift; scope; range, as of an argument.
  8. (printing, dated) The sprue of a type, which is broken from it when the type is cold.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

jet (third-person singular simple present jets, present participle jetting, simple past and past participle jetted)

  1. (intransitive) To spray out of a container.
  2. (transitive) To spray with liquid from a container.
  3. (intransitive) To travel on a jet aircraft or otherwise by jet propulsion
  4. (intransitive) To move (running, walking etc.) rapidly around
  5. To shoot forward or out; to project; to jut out.
  6. To strut; to walk with a lofty or haughty gait; to be insolent; to obtrude.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus, Act II Scene 1,[1]
      Why, lords, and think you not how dangerous
      It is to jet upon a prince’s right?
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Act II Scene 5,[2]
      Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock of him: how he jets under his advanced plumes!
  7. To jerk; to jolt; to be shaken.
    • 1719, Richard Wiseman, Serjeant-Chirurgeon to King Charles II, Eight Chirurgical Treatises, London: B. Tooke et al., 5th edition, Volume 2, Book 5, Chapter 4, p. 78,[3]
      A Lady was wounded down the whole Length of the Forehead to the Nose [] It happened to her travelling in a Hackney-Coach, upon the jetting whereof she was thrown out of the hinder Seat against a Bar of Iron in the forepart of the Coach.
  8. To adjust the fuel to air ratio of a carburetor; to install or adjust a carburetor jet
  9. (slang) To leave.
Translations

Adjective

jet (not comparable)

  1. Propelled by turbine engines.
    jet airplane
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English get, geet, gete, from a northern form of Old French jayet, jaiet, gaiet, from Latin gagātēs, from Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs), from Γάγας (Gágas, a town and river in Lycia). Doublet of gagate.

Noun

jet (plural jets)

  1. (mineralogy) A hard, black form of coal, sometimes used in jewellery.
    Hypernyms: lignite, mineraloid
  2. (color) The colour of jet coal, deep grey.
Alternative forms
  • jeat (obsolete)
Derived terms
  • jet-black
Descendants
  • German: Jett
Translations

Adjective

jet (comparative jetter or more jet, superlative jettest or most jet)

  1. Very dark black in colour.
    Synonym: jet-black
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 23:
      She was an ash blonde with greenish eyes, beaded lashes, hair waved smoothly back from ears in which large jet buttons glittered.
Translations

See also

  • Appendix:Colors

Further reading

  • jet in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • jet on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • jet (gemstone) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • tej

Central Franconian

Etymology

From Old High German iowiht, from io (always) + wiht (thing) << Proto-West Germanic *wihti.

Cognate with Middle Dutch iewet, iet (whence Limburgish get, contemporary Dutch iets), English aught.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɛt/, /jət/

Pronoun

jet (indefinite)

  1. (Ripuarian, northernmost Moselle Franconian) something; anything
    Luur ens, ich hann der jet metjebraht.

    Look, I’ve brought you something.

Synonyms

  • eppes, ebbes (most of Moselle Franconian)

Antonyms

  • nühs (nix)

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ěxati, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɛt/
  • Homophone: jed
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Verb

jet impf

  1. to ride
  2. to go (by vehicle)

Usage notes

Jet is in the class of Czech concrete verbs. Its counterpart, jezdit, is an abstract verb.

Conjugation

Antonyms

  • nejet

Derived terms

  • dojet
  • nadjet
  • podjet
  • projet
  • přejet
  • objet
  • rozjet
  • ujet
  • vjet
  • zajet

Related terms

See also

  • jezdit

References

Further reading

  • jeti in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • jeti in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French

Etymology 1

From Old French get, giet, from a Vulgar Latin *iectus, jectus, an alteration of Latin iactus (a throwing, throw).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒɛ/

Noun

jet m (plural jets)

  1. throw
  2. spurt, spout, jet

Derived terms

Related terms

  • jeter

Descendants

  • English: jet

Further reading

  • “jet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Etymology 2

From English jet (airplane).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛt/

Noun

jet m (plural jets)

  1. jet (airplane)

Further reading

  • “jet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Noun

jet m (plural jets)

  1. bed

Middle English

Noun

jet

  1. Alternative form of get (jet)

Old French

Etymology

From Latin iactus

Noun

jet

  1. throw

Descendants

  • Anglo-Norman: jet
  • French: jet
    • English: jet

Romanian

Etymology

From French jet.

Noun

jet n (plural jeturi)

  1. jet (of a gas of liquid)

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English jet.

Pronunciation

Noun

jet m (plural jets)

  1. jet

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