gush vs rave what difference

what is difference between gush and rave

English

Etymology

From Middle English guschen, gusshen, gosshien, perhaps from Middle Dutch guysen (to flow out with a gurgling sound, gush) or Old Norse gusa (to gush), ultimately imitative.

Compare Old Norse geysa (to gush), German gießen (to pour), Old English ġēotan (“to pour”; > English yote). Related to gust.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡʌʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Noun

gush (plural gushes)

  1. A sudden rapid outflow.
    • 1990, Stephen King, The Moving Finger
      There was a cartoon woman in an apron on the front. She stood with one hand on her hip while she used the other hand to pour a gush of drain-cleaner into something that was either an industrial sink or Orson Welles’s bidet.

Translations

Verb

gush (third-person singular simple present gushes, present participle gushing, simple past and past participle gushed)

  1. (intransitive, also figuratively) To flow forth suddenly, in great volume.
  2. (transitive, also figuratively) To send (something) flowing forth suddenly in great volume.
    • 1993, Brian Lumley, Blood Brothers, Macmillan (→ISBN), page 119:
      The other was no longer capable of controlling his anger; his parasite creature amplified his passion by ten; his jaws cracked open and his great mouth gushed blood from torn gums as teeth grew out of them like bone sickles.
    • 2001, Larry L. Miller, Tennessee Place-names, Indiana University Press (→ISBN), page 196:
      A beautiful spring gushed water from the ground in this mountainous sector of Polk County, inspiring the name of the place.
  3. (intransitive, especially of a woman) To ejaculate during orgasm.
    • 2008, Anya Bast, The Chosen Sin, Penguin (→ISBN), page 154:
      Her orgasm exploded over her, making her writhe and cry out his name. She gushed over his hand, her cunt gripping and releasing his invading fingers.
    • 2009, Emma Holly, Kissing Midnight, Penguin (→ISBN):
      Somehow, this made his ejaculations all the more exciting, sending hot tingles streaking through her as he gushed.
    • 2014, Stewart N. Johnson, Parthian Stranger 2 Conspiracy, Trafford Publishing (→ISBN):
      [] she pulled off an amazing orgasm, one after another, she gushed with force, []
    • 2017, Cara McKinnon, Memories of Magic, Stars and Stone Books (→ISBN):
      Odd. She’d never managed to do that to herself before—to climax so hard she gushed. Sometimes her sex partners didn’t satisfy her as well as she could on her own, but her most intense orgasms had always been with others.
  4. (intransitive, transitive, figuratively) To make an excessive display of enthusiasm, praise, or sentiment.
    • 1911, Thompson Buchanan, Making People Happy, page 14:
      Miss Johnson gushed approval with her usual air of coquettish superiority.
    • 2010, Pat Williams, Jim Denney, How to Be Like Walt: Capturing the Disney Magic Every Day of Your Life, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN):
      Randy Thornton, a producer with Walt Disney Records, put it this way: “Walt was not a man who gushed praise. His biggest words of approval were, ‘That’ll work.’
    • 2017, Judson G. Everitt, Lesson Plans: The Institutional Demands of Becoming a Teacher, Rutgers University Press (→ISBN):
      Nellie routinely gushed praise to students for good performance whereas Frank was much more sparing in praising students.

Translations

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Anagrams

  • Shug, hugs, shug

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *gunša, close to Lithuanian gùžas (knag), Old Norse kjuka (ankle) and Old Church Slavonic gustъ (gustŭ, thick, dense).

Noun

gush f (definite singular gusha)

  1. neck, Adam’s apple

Related terms

  • gungë
  • kungull


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rāv, IPA(key): /ɹeɪv/
  • Rhymes: -eɪv

Etymology 1

From Middle English raven (to rave; talk like a madman), from Old French raver, variant of resver, of uncertain origin. Compare rove.

Noun

rave (countable and uncountable, plural raves)

  1. An enthusiastic review (such as of a play).
    • 1989, The New York Times Theater Reviews, 1920- (volume 18, page 167)
      The first-night audience, yes. The first-night reviewers, not exactly. The notices have so far been mixed, only The Financial Times having delivered itself of an unequivocal rave.
  2. An all-night dance party with electronic dance music (techno, trance, drum and bass etc.) and possibly drug use.
  3. (music, uncountable) The genres of electronic dance music usually associated with rave parties.
    • 2009, Chrysalis Experiential Academy, Mind Harvesting (page 109)
      Maybe I wear baggies / And white socks with flip-flops / Maybe I don’t like listening to rave / And I’m not on the social mountaintops
Translations

Verb

rave (third-person singular simple present raves, present participle raving, simple past and past participle raved)

  1. To wander in mind or intellect; to be delirious; to talk or act irrationally; to be wild, furious, or raging.
  2. To speak or write wildly or incoherently.
  3. To talk with unreasonable enthusiasm or excessive passion or excitement; followed by about, of, or (formerly) on.
  4. (obsolete) To rush wildly or furiously.
  5. To attend a rave (dance party).
Translations

See also

  • rant

Etymology 2

English dialect raves, or rathes (a frame laid on a wagon, for carrying hay, etc.).

Noun

rave (plural raves)

  1. One of the upper side pieces of the frame of a wagon body or a sleigh.

Etymology 3

Verb

rave

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense of rive

Anagrams

  • AVRE, Vera, aver, evar, vare, vera

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin raphănus, from Ancient Greek ῥάφανος (rháphanos). Cf. also French rave.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /ˈra.və/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈra.bə/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈra.ve/

Noun

rave m (plural raves)

  1. radish
  2. (figuratively) trifle (thing of little importance or worth)

Derived terms

  • ravenera
  • ravenissa

Further reading

  • “rave” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “rave” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “rave” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

References


Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /raːvə/, [ˈʁɑːwə]

Verb

rave (imperative rav, infinitive at rave, present tense raver, past tense ravede, perfect tense har ravet)

  1. reel
  2. stagger, totter, lurch

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

rave

  1. first-person singular present indicative of raven
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of raven
  3. imperative of raven

Anagrams

  • vare

French

Etymology 1

From Old French, from Latin rapa, plural of rāpum, used instead as a feminine singular. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *rap-. Compare Italian rapa and Venetian rava.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁav/

Noun

rave m (plural raves)

  1. beet, turnip

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English rave.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁɛv/

Noun

rave m (plural raves)

  1. rave party
    Synonym: rave party

Anagrams

  • rêva

Further reading

  • “rave” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈraː.u̯e/, [ˈɾäːu̯ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈra.ve/, [ˈrɑːvɛ]

Adjective

rāve

  1. vocative masculine singular of rāvus

References

  • rave in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Middle English

Noun

rave

  1. Alternative form of reif

Spanish

Etymology

From English rave.

Noun

rave f (plural raves)

  1. rave (party)

Venetian

Noun

rave

  1. plural of rava

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial