gustation vs taste what difference

what is difference between gustation and taste

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin gustatio, gustationis.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

gustation (countable and uncountable, plural gustations)

  1. The act of tasting.
    • 1841, Robley Dunglison, Human Physiology, page 109
      The organ of gustation is not, therefore, restricted to the production of that sense, but participates in the sense of touch.
  2. The ability to taste flavors; the sense of taste.

Related terms

  • gustatory

Translations


French

Pronunciation

Noun

gustation f (plural gustations)

  1. gustation; tasting


English

Alternative forms

  • tast (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English tasten, borrowed from Old French taster, from assumed Vulgar Latin *tastāre, from assumed Vulgar Latin *taxitāre, a new iterative of Latin taxāre (to touch sharply), from tangere (to touch). Almost displaced native Middle English smaken, smakien (to taste) (from Old English smacian (to taste)), Middle English smecchen (to taste, smack) (from Old English smæċċan (to taste)) (whence Modern English smack), Middle English buriȝen (to taste) (from Old English byrigan, birian (to taste)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /teɪst/
  • Rhymes: -eɪst

Noun

taste (countable and uncountable, plural tastes)

  1. One of the sensations produced by the tongue in response to certain chemicals; the quality of giving this sensation.
  2. The sense that consists in the perception and interpretation of this sensation.
  3. A small sample of food, drink, or recreational drugs.
  4. (countable and uncountable) A person’s implicit set of preferences, especially esthetic, though also culinary, sartorial, etc.
    • “My tastes,” he said, still smiling, “incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet.” And, to tease her and arouse her to combat: “I prefer a farandole to a nocturne; I’d rather have a painting than an etching; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don’t like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects; [].”
  5. Personal preference; liking; predilection.
  6. (uncountable, figuratively) A small amount of experience with something that gives a sense of its quality as a whole.
  7. A kind of narrow and thin silk ribbon.

Synonyms

  • (sensation produced by the tongue): smack, smatch; See also Thesaurus:gustation
  • (set of preferences): discernment, culture, refinement, style
  • (personal preference): See also Thesaurus:predilection
  • (small amount of experience): impression, sample, trial

Hyponyms

  • (sensation produced by the tongue): relish, savor

Meronyms

  • (sensation produced by the tongue): bitter, salty, sour, sweet, umami

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

taste (third-person singular simple present tastes, present participle tasting, simple past and past participle tasted)

  1. (transitive) To sample the flavor of something orally.
    • when the ruler of the feast had tasted the water that was made wine
  2. (intransitive, copulative) To have a taste; to excite a particular sensation by which flavour is distinguished.
    The chicken tasted great, but the milk tasted like garlic.
  3. To experience.
    I tasted in her arms the delights of paradise.
    They had not yet tasted the sweetness of freedom.
    • He [] should taste death for every man.
  4. To take sparingly.
    • 1699, John Dryden, Epistle to John Drydentastes%20of%20pleasures%2C%20youth%20devours%22&f=false
      Age but tastes of pleasures, youth devours.
  5. To try by eating a little; to eat a small quantity of.
    • I tasted a little of this honey.
  6. (obsolete) To try by the touch; to handle.

Synonyms

  • (sample the flavor of something): smack, smake; See also Thesaurus:taste
  • (have a taste): hint, smack; See also Thesaurus:have taste

Translations

Further reading

  • taste in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • taste in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • taste at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • “taste” in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 313.

Anagrams

  • Satet, State, Teats, Testa, Tetas, aetts, atest, state, teats, testa

Danish

Etymology

From the noun tast.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -astə

Verb

taste (imperative tast, infinitive at taste, present tense taster, past tense tastede, perfect tense har/er tastet)

  1. To type

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • indtaste

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

taste

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of tasten

German

Pronunciation

Verb

taste

  1. inflection of tasten:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • tast, taist

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French tast.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taːst/, /tast/

Noun

taste (uncountable)

  1. perceived flavor

Descendants

  • English: taste
  • Yola: taaste, tawest, thaaste

References

  • “tā̆st(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

taste (imperative tast, present tense taster, passive tastes, simple past and past participle tasta or tastet, present participle tastende)

  1. to type (on a computer keyboard or typewriter)

Related terms

  • tast (noun)
  • tastatur

References

  • “taste” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Serbo-Croatian

Noun

taste (Cyrillic spelling тасте)

  1. vocative singular of tast

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