gusto vs zest what difference

what is difference between gusto and zest

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian gusto, from Latin gustus (tasting). Doublet of cost.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡʌstəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡʌstoʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌstəʊ

Noun

gusto (uncountable)

  1. Enthusiasm; enjoyment, vigor.
    • 1993, Paul Chadwick, The Dictator’s Dream, Dark Horse Books
      And the sound increases … the power grows … gusto becomes something else: rage.

Translations

Anagrams

  • gouts

Bikol Central

Verb

gusto

  1. to want, to like
    Synonyms: muya, suno

Catalan

Verb

gusto

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of gustar

Esperanto

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡusto/
  • Hyphenation: gus‧to
  • Rhymes: -usto

Noun

gusto (accusative singular guston, plural gustoj, accusative plural gustojn)

  1. taste
  2. flavor

Derived terms

  • antaŭgusto (foretaste)
  • bongusta (tasty)
  • gusta (of or related to taste)
  • gusti (to have a taste)
  • gustigi (to taste like)

Galician

Alternative forms

  • gosto

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin gustus.

Pronunciation

  • (standard) IPA(key): [ˈɡus̺.t̪ʊ]
  • (dialectal) IPA(key): [ˈħus̺.t̪ʊ]

Noun

gusto m (plural gustos)

  1. taste (sense)
  2. taste (flavour)
  3. liking, preference, aesthetic preference
  4. pleasure, enthusiasm
  5. fancy, whim

Verb

gusto

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gustar

Italian

Etymology

From Latin gustus (tasting), from Proto-Italic *gustus, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus. It was possibly a semi-learned borrowing.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡus.to/
  • Rhymes: -usto
  • Hyphenation: gù‧sto

Noun

gusto m (plural gusti)

  1. taste (the sense)
  2. taste, flavour
    Synonym: sapore
  3. gusto, enjoyment, relish
  4. fancy, whim
  5. (in the plural) preferences

Hypernyms

  • cinque sensi

Derived terms

  • gustare
  • gustativo
  • gustoso

Descendants

  • Alemannic German: Gust
  • English: gusto
  • Serbo-Croatian: gušt

Verb

gusto

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gustare

Latin

Etymology

From unattested *gustus (tasted), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵustós, from *ǵews- (to taste). Cognate with gustus (a taste).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈɡus.toː/, [ˈɡʊs̠t̪oː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈɡus.to/, [ˈɡust̪ɔ]

Verb

gustō (present infinitive gustāre, perfect active gustāvī, supine gustātum); first conjugation

  1. I taste, sample.
  2. I snack; I whet my appetite.

Conjugation

1At least one rare poetic syncopated perfect form is attested.

Derived terms

  • dēgustō
  • gustātiō
  • praegustō
  • regustō

Descendants

References

  • gusto in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gusto in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • gusto in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume II, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 399

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡustɔ/

Adverb

gusto (comparative gusćej, superlative nejgusćej)

  1. thickly, densely

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡûːsto/
  • Hyphenation: gu‧sto

Adverb

gȗsto (Cyrillic spelling гу̑сто)

  1. densely

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin gustus (tasting), from Proto-Italic *gustus, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵéwstus. Replaced the inherited Old Spanish form gosto. The learned word has a more abstract meaning overall.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡusto/, [ˈɡus.t̪o]

Noun

gusto m (plural gustos)

  1. taste (sense)
  2. taste (flavour)
  3. liking, preference, aesthetic preference
  4. pleasure, enthusiasm
  5. fancy, whim

Derived terms

Verb

gusto

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of gustar.

References

  • “gusto” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Tagalog

Etymology

From Spanish gusto.

Noun

gusto

  1. want, like, desire
    Synonyms: kagustuhan, kursonada, nais, ibig

Verb

gusto

  1. to want; like
    Synonyms: ibig, nais

Usage notes

  • The verb gusto is considered as a pseudo-verb, which is a word that acts like a verb but has no affixes attached to it, and therefore does not conjugate. It is considered to be the more casual equivalent to nais and ibig.

Derived terms



English

Etymology

Borrowed from French zeste.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zɛst/
  • Rhymes: -ɛst

Noun

zest (countable and uncountable, plural zests)

  1. The outer skin of a citrus fruit, used as a flavouring or garnish.
    The orange zest gives the strong flavor in this dish.
  2. General vibrance of flavour.
    I add zest to the meat by rubbing it with a spice mixture before grilling.
    • 1959, Peter De Vries, The Tents of Wickedness, Boston: Little, Brown & Co., “The Treehouse,” Chapter 7, p. 92,[1]
      He rolled his own cigarettes from a sack of Bull Durham, spilling flakes into his beer, which no doubt gained in zest thereby.
    • 1978, Joseph Singer et al. (translators), Shosha by Isaac Bashevis Singer, New York: Fawcett Crest, Part One, Chapter Five, 1, p. 99,[2]
      Bashele’s dishes tasted as good as they had when I was a child. No one could give to the borscht such a sweet-and-sour zest as Bashele.
  3. (by extension) Enthusiasm; keen enjoyment; relish; gusto.
    Auntie Mame had a real zest for life.
    • 1728, Edward Young, Love of Fame, the Universal Passion, Satire II in The Works of the Reverend Edward Young, London: P. Brown, H. Hill & S. Payne, 1765, Volume I, p. 85,[3]
      Almighty vanity! to thee they owe
      Their zest of pleasure, and their balm of woe.
    • 1807, Thomas Cogan, An Ethical Treatise on the Passions, Bath: Hazard & Binns, Part 1, Disquisition 1, Chapter 1, Section 1 “On the utility of the Passions and Affections,” p. 51,[4]
      Liberality of disposition and conduct gives the highest zest and relish to social intercourse.
    • 1928, D. H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, New York: Barnes & Noble, 1995, Chapter 9, p. 101,[5]
      Once started, Mrs. Bolton was better than any book, about the lives of the people. She knew them all so intimately, and had such a peculiar, flamey zest in all their affairs, it was wonderful, if just a trifle humiliating to listen to her.
    • 1962, James Baldwin, Another Country, New York: Dell, 1963, Book Two, Chapter 2, p. 221,[6]
      The singers, male and female, wore blue jeans and long hair and had more zest than talent.
  4. (rare) The woody, thick skin enclosing the kernel of a walnut.
    • 2006, N. J. Nusha, On the Edge (Short Stories), Lahore: Sang-e-Meel Publications, p. 85,
      The green zest of walnuts was used by the women to shine their teeth and it also gave a beautiful rust colour to their lips.

Synonyms

  • (enthusiasm): gusto, relish
  • (general vibrance of flavour): punch, spice, tang, zing

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

zest (third-person singular simple present zests, present participle zesting, simple past and past participle zested)

  1. (cooking) To scrape the zest from a fruit.
  2. To make more zesty.
    • 1792, James Cobb, The Siege of Belgrade, a Comic Opera, in Three Acts, page 47:
      Strains ſo artleſs tho’ we proffer,
      Hearts o’er flowing zest the offer.

Derived terms

  • zester

References

Anagrams

  • Tsez

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zɛst/

Noun

zest m (plural zests)

  1. zest (of a fruit)

Further reading

  • “zest” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Swedish

Noun

zest c

  1. zest; the outer skin of a citrus fruit

Declension

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