Gymnasium vs lyceum what difference

what is difference between Gymnasium and lyceum

English

Etymology

From Latin gymnasium, from Ancient Greek γυμνάσιον (gumnásion, exercise, school), from γυμνός (gumnós, naked), because Greek athletes trained naked.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /dʒɪmˈneɪ.zi.əm/

Noun

gymnasium (plural gymnasia or gymnasiums)

  1. (formal) A large room or building for indoor sports.
  2. A type of secondary school in some European countries which typically prepares students for university.
  3. (historical) A public place or building where Ancient Greek youths took exercise, with running and wrestling grounds, baths, and halls for conversation.

Synonyms

  • (large room or building for indoor sports): gym
  • (type of secondary school): prep school, college prep school

Related terms

  • gymnastics

Translations


Czech

Alternative forms

  • gymnázium

Noun

gymnasium n

  1. (archaic) grammar school

Declension

Further reading

  • gymnasium in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • gymnasium in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

From Latin gymnasium, from Ancient Greek γυμνάσιον (gumnásion, exercise, school).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡymnaːsjɔm/, [ɡ̊ymˈnæːˀɕɔm]
  • Rhymes: -ɔm

Noun

gymnasium n (singular definite gymnasiet, plural indefinite gymnasier, in compounds: gymnasie-)

  1. gymnasium (a type of secondary school)

Inflection

Further reading

  • gymnasium on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Dutch

Etymology

From Latin gymnasium, from Ancient Greek γυμνάσιον (gumnásion, exercise, school).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: gym‧na‧si‧um

Noun

gymnasium n (plural gymnasia or gymnasiums, diminutive gymnasiumpje n)

  1. a type of secondary school (for 12 to 18 year-olds) which prepares students for university or vocational school, and which offers classes in Latin and/or Greek
  2. school of sports which the Greeks had in antiquity

Related terms

  • gym

Descendants

  • Indonesian: gimnasium

See also

  • atheneum

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek γυμνάσιον (gumnásion, exercise, school), from γυμνός (gumnós, naked), because Greek athletes trained naked.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ɡymˈna.si.um/, [ɡʏmˈnäs̠iʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /d͡ʒimˈna.si.um/, [d͡ʒimˈnɑːs̬ium]

Noun

gymnasium n (genitive gymnasiī or gymnasī); second declension

  1. gymnasium

Declension

Second-declension noun (neuter).

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Related terms

  • gymnasticus

Descendants

  • Albanian: gjimnaz
  • Catalan: gimnàs
  • French: gymnase
  • Galician: ximnasio
  • German: Gymnasium (see there for further descendants)
  • Italian: ginnasio
  • Portuguese: ginásio
  • Spanish: gimnasio

References

  • gymnasium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gymnasium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • gymnasium in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • gymnasium in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • gymnasium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • gymnasium in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • gymnasium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

gymnasium n (definite singular gymnasiet, indefinite plural gymnasier, definite plural gymnasia or gymnasiene)

  1. alternative form of gymnas

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

gymnasium n (definite singular gymnasiet, indefinite plural gymnasium, definite plural gymnasia)

  1. alternative form of gymnas

Swedish

Alternative forms

  • gymnasie (nonstandard)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jʏmˈnɑːsɪɵm/, /jʏmˈnɑːsɪɛ/

Noun

gymnasium n

  1. gymnasium; an upper secondary school: either theoretical (“preparing for further studies”) or vocational

Declension

Synonyms

  • gymnasieskola

See also

  • gymnasist


English

Etymology

From Ancient Greek Λύκειον (Lúkeion) (the name of a gymnasium, or athletic training facility, near Athens where Aristotle established his school), from Λύκειος (“Lycian” or “wolf-killer”).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /laɪˈsiːəm/

Noun

lyceum (plural lyceums)

  1. (historical) A public hall designed for lectures, readings, or concerts.
    • 1854, Henry David Thoreau, Life Without Principle
      At a lyceum, not long since, I felt that the lecturer had chosen a theme too foreign to himself, and so failed to interest me as much as he might have done.
    • 1875, Henry James, Roderick Hudson, New York Edition 1909, hardcover, page 414
      In the autumn he was to return home; his family – composed, as Rowland knew, of a father, who was a cashier in a bank, and five unmarried sisters, one of whom gave lyceum lectures on woman’s rights, the whole resident at Buffalo, N.Y. – had been writing him peremptory letters and appealing to him as son, brother and fellow-citizen.
  2. (US, historical) A school, especially European, at a stage between elementary school and college, a lycée.
  3. An association for literary improvement.

Translations

References

  • lyceum in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • lyceum at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • cymule

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

lyceum n (definite singular lyceet, indefinite plural lyceer, definite plural lycea or lyceene)

  1. alternative form of lycé

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

lyceum n (definite singular lyceet, indefinite plural lyceum, definite plural lycea)

  1. alternative form of lycé

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