gyp vs scam what difference

what is difference between gyp and scam

English

Etymology 1

Perhaps from the term gypsy (Roma), due to a stereotype of the Roma as swindlers. Compare jew (defraud), from Jew, and welsh (swindle by defaulting on a debt), from Welsh.

Alternative forms

  • gip, jip (eye dialect spellings)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Noun

gyp (plural gyps)

  1. (derogatory, sometimes offensive) A cheat or swindle; a rip-off.
    Why do we have to buy this new edition of the textbook when there’s almost no difference between it and the previous one? What a gyp!
  2. Synonym of gypsy (contra dance step)
Usage notes

Because this term is often considered to derive from the exonymic term Gypsy and represent a racist stereotype of the Romani, it may be offensive. See the usage note about gypsy.

Translations

Verb

gyp (third-person singular simple present gyps, present participle gypping, simple past and past participle gypped)

  1. (derogatory, sometimes offensive) To cheat or swindle someone or something inappropriately.
    The cab driver gypped me out of ten bucks by taking the longer route.
    You better watch out; they’ll try to gyp you if you don’t know what you’re doing.
Usage notes

See the notes about the noun, above.

Etymology 2

Perhaps the same as Etymology 1. An earlier theory derived the term from Ancient Greek γύψ (gúps, vulture) (/ɡýps/; compare Greek γύπας (gýpas) /ˈʝi.pas/), “in reference to thievish habits of the servants” (and then derived Etymology 1 thence), but this does not explain the pronunciation.

Noun

gyp (plural gyps)

  1. (Cambridge and Durham, England, now chiefly historical) A college servant, one who would attend upon a number of students, brushing their clothes, carrying parcels, waiting at parties and other tasks, distinct from a college porter or bedder.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure, 1919, Longmans, page 15,
      ‘Why, what is the matter with you, John?’ I asked of the gyp who waited on Vincey and myself.
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, I [Uniform ed., p. 14]:
      Had he acted discourteously to his bedmaker or his gyp, he would have minded just as much … .
  2. (Cambridge and Durham, England) The room in which such college servants work.
  3. (Cambridge and Durham, England) A small kitchen for use by college students.

Etymology 3

Shortening.

Noun

gyp (plural gyps)

  1. Gypsophila.

Etymology 4

Perhaps from gee up.

Noun

gyp (plural gyps)

  1. Pain or discomfort.
    My back’s giving me gyp.

See also

  • jew down
  • welsh

References

  • Gyp: Thieve, World Wide Words
  • Etymology of “Gyp” / “gypped”, Vocaboly.com



English

Etymology

US carnival slang. Possibly from scamp (swindler, cheater). Also possibly from skam.

The word “scam” became common use among the US “drug culture” in early 1980 after Operation ABSCAM, an FBI sting operation directed at public officials, became public.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: skăm, IPA(key): /skæm/
  • Rhymes: -æm

Noun

scam (plural scams)

  1. A fraudulent deal.
    That marketing scheme looks like a scam to me.
  2. Something that is promoted using scams.
    That car was a scam.

Synonyms

  • con game, confidence trick, swindle
  • See also Thesaurus:deception

Coordinate terms

  • take for a ride

Translations

Verb

scam (third-person singular simple present scams, present participle scamming, simple past and past participle scammed)

  1. (transitive) To defraud or embezzle.
    They tried to scam her out of her savings.

Synonyms

  • con

Translations

Anagrams

  • ACMs, ACSM, CAMs, CASM, CSMA, M. A. Sc., M.A.Sc., MACs, MASc, MCAs, Macs, SMAC, cams, macs, masc, masc.

Middle Irish

Etymology

Attested only in the plural form scaim. From Proto-Celtic *skamos. Cognate with Welsh ysgafn (“light”) and Welsh ysgyfaint (“(pair of) lungs”), Breton skañv, Cornish skav.

Noun

scam

  1. lung

References

  • Matasović, R. (2009). Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic, p.339. Brill: Boston.

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