gyrate vs spin what difference

what is difference between gyrate and spin

English

Etymology

Back-formed from gyration, from gyre, borrowed from Latin gyrare, from Ancient Greek γῦρος (gûros, a circle).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒaɪɹeɪt/

Verb

gyrate (third-person singular simple present gyrates, present participle gyrating, simple past and past participle gyrated)

  1. To revolve round a central point; to move spirally about an axis, as a tornado; to revolve.

Translations

Adjective

gyrate (comparative more gyrate, superlative most gyrate)

  1. (biology) Having coils or convolutions

Translations


Latin

Verb

gȳrāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of gȳrō


English

Etymology

From Middle English spinnen, from Old English spinnan, from Proto-Germanic *spinnaną, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)penh₁-. Compare Low German spinnen, Dutch spinnen, German spinnen, Danish spinde, Swedish spinna.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Verb

spin (third-person singular simple present spins, present participle spinning, simple past and past participle spun or span)

  1. (ergative) To rotate, revolve, gyrate (usually quickly); to partially or completely rotate to face another direction.
  2. (transitive) To make yarn by twisting and winding fibers together.
  3. (figuratively) To present, describe, or interpret, or to introduce a bias or slant, so as to give something a favorable or advantageous appearance.
    Synonyms: whitewash, sugarcoat, put lipstick on, gild, blandish, dress up
  4. (cricket, of a bowler) To make the ball move sideways when it bounces on the pitch.
  5. (cricket, of a ball) To move sideways when bouncing.
  6. (cooking) To form into thin strips or ribbons, as with sugar
  7. To form (a web, a cocoon, silk, etc.) from threads produced by the extrusion of a viscid, transparent liquid, which hardens on coming into contact with the air; said of the spider, the silkworm, etc.
  8. To shape, as malleable sheet metal, into a hollow form, by bending or buckling it by pressing against it with a smooth hand tool or roller while the metal revolves, as in a lathe.
  9. To move swiftly.
  10. To stream or issue in a thread or a small current or jet.
  11. (computing, programming, intransitive) To wait in a loop until some condition becomes true.
  12. (transitive, informal) To play (vinyl records, etc.) as a disc jockey.
    • 2002, CMJ New Music Report (volume 70, number 12)
      However, for the past six years he has been spinning his novel blend of progressive house and trance music and is finally on the brink of becoming the next luminary DJ.
  13. (intransitive) To use an exercise bicycle, especially as part of a gym class.
  14. An abnormal condition in journal bearings where the bearing seizes to the shaft that is rotating and rotates inside the journal, destroying both the shaft and the journal.
  15. (Britain, law enforcement, slang, transitive) To search rapidly.
    • 2013, Nick Oldham, Psycho Alley
      But then again, unless someone struck lucky in those first few hours, there weren’t even enough detectives to spin a drum [house].

Hypernyms

  • revolve
  • rotate
  • turn

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • turn around

Noun

spin (countable and uncountable, plural spins)

  1. Rapid circular motion.
    The car went into a spin.
    The skaters demonstrated their spins.
    He put some spin on the cue ball.
  2. (physics) A quantum angular momentum associated with subatomic particles, which also creates a magnetic moment.
  3. (countable, uncountable) A favourable comment or interpretation intended to bias opinion on an otherwise unpleasant situation.
    Try to put a positive spin on the disappointing sales figures.
    The politician was mocked in the press for his reliance on spin rather than facts.
    Synonym: propaganda
  4. (sports) Rotation of the ball as it flies through the air; sideways movement of the ball as it bounces.
  5. (aviation) A condition of flight where a stalled aircraft is simultaneously pitching, yawing and rolling in a spinning motion.
  6. A brief trip by vehicle, especially one made for pleasure.
  7. A bundle of spun material; a mass of strands and filaments.
    • 1913, DH Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 1
      She left him alone, and went to get Annie a spin of toffee.
  8. A single play of a record by a radio station.
    • 1996, Billboard (volume 108, number 12, page 37)
      Although the Loveless title showed the smallest increase in airplay in the top 10, its number of detections outpaced the nearest bulleted title by more than 350 spins.
  9. (Britain, prison slang) A search of a prisoner’s cell for forbidden articles.
    • 2002, Jeffrey Archer, A Prison Diary
      Mr Weedon explains that this is a cell search – known by prisoners as a spin – and for obvious reasons it has to be carried out without any warning.
  10. (dated) Unmarried woman, spinster.
    • 1893, Bithia Mary Croker, “To Let” in “To Let” etc., Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1906, p. 1, [3]
      Some years ago, when I was a slim young spin, I came out to India to live with my brother Tom []
  11. (uncountable) The use of an exercise bicycle, especially as part of a gym class.
  12. (nautical) Short for spinnaker.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Insp, NIPs, NPIs, Nips, PINs, PSNI, nips, pins, snip

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɪn/
  • Hyphenation: spin
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch spinne.

Noun

spin f (plural spinnen, diminutive spinnetje n)

  1. spider, member of the order Araneae
Derived terms
  • kruisspin
  • spinnekop
  • spinnendoder
  • spinnenweb
  • vogelspin
  • wolfsspin

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English spin.

Noun

spin m (plural spins)

  1. (physics) particle spin
Derived terms
  • kernspin

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English spin.

Noun

spin m (uncountable)

  1. political spin, media spin
Derived terms
  • spindoctor

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

spin

  1. first-person singular present indicative of spinnen
  2. imperative of spinnen

Faroese

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spiːn/

Noun

spin n (genitive singular spins, uncountable)

  1. sperm

Declension

Synonyms

  • spina

Anagrams

  • nisp
  • pins

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English spin.

Alternative forms

  • spinni

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspin/, [ˈs̠pin]
  • Rhymes: -in
  • Syllabification: spin

Noun

spin

  1. (physics) spin

Declension


French

Etymology

Borrowed from English spin.

Pronunciation

Noun

spin m (plural spins)

  1. (physics) spin

Derived terms

  • spineur

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin spīnus.

Noun

spin m (plural spins)

  1. thorn bush

Related terms

  • spine

Garo

Etymology

Cognate with Kokborok siping (sesame).

Noun

spin

  1. sesame

Hungarian

Etymology

From English spin.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -in

Noun

spin (plural spinek)

  1. (physics) spin (quantum angular momentum)

Declension

References


Middle English

Noun

spin

  1. Alternative form of spyne

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spʲin/

Etymology 1

From English spin.

Noun

spin m inan

  1. (physics) spin (quantum angular momentum)
Declension
Derived terms
  • (adjective) spinowy

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

spin f

  1. genitive plural of spina

Further reading

  • spin in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • spin in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English spin.

Noun

spin m (plural spins)

  1. (physics) spin (quantum angular momentum of subatomic particles)

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin spīnus, from spīna, from Proto-Italic *speinā, from Proto-Indo-European *spey- (sharp point). Compare Aromanian schin

Noun

spin m (plural spini)

  1. thorn

Declension

Synonyms

  • ghimpe, aculeu

Related terms

  • spinos

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɪn/

Noun

spin (plural spins)

  1. (South Scots) Alternative form of spuin

Spanish

Alternative forms

  • espín

Etymology

Borrowed from English spin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈpin/, [esˈpĩn]

Noun

spin m (plural spines)

  1. spin (clarification of this definition is needed)

West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

spin c (plural spinnen, diminutive spintsje)

  1. spider

Further reading

  • “spin”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial