gyro vs gyroscope what difference

what is difference between gyro and gyroscope

English

Etymology 1

Originally a shortening of gyroscope.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒaɪɹoʊ/
  • Homophone: giro
  • Rhymes: -aɪɹəʊ
  • Rhymes: -ɪəɹəʊ

Noun

gyro (plural gyros)

  1. A gyroscope.
  2. A gyrocompass.
  3. An autogyro.
Derived terms
  • directional gyro
Translations

Etymology 2

From Greek γύρος (gýros); from the turning of the meat on a spit. Doublet of gyre and gyrus.

Alternative forms

  • gyros, giro, giros
  • yero

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒaɪɹoʊ/, /ˈjiː.ɹoʊ/, /ˈjɪɹoʊ/, /ˈʒɪɹoʊ/

Noun

gyro (plural gyros)

  1. A style of Greek sandwich commonly filled with grilled meat, tomato, onions, and tzatziki sauce.
    I’ll have a gyro, please.
Usage notes

The correct pronunciation of this word is disputed. The pronunciation /ˈdʒaɪɹoʊ/ is often proscribed. All of the listed pronunciations may be found in use. (The modern Greek pronunciation is /ˈʝiɾos/.):

Translations

See also

  • kebab
  • shawarma, shoarma, shwarma
  • souvlaki

References

Linguist List has a discussion of pronunciations (archived).

Anagrams

  • Győr, gory, ogry, orgy

French

Etymology

From Greek γύρος (gýros).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒi.ʁo/

Noun

gyro m (plural gyros)

  1. gyro; Alternative spelling of gyros (Greek sandwich)

Alternative forms

  • gyros
  • yero

Latin

Etymology

From gȳrus (circle), from Ancient Greek γῦρος (gûros).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈɡyː.roː/, [ˈɡyːɾoː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒi.ro/, [ˈd͡ʒiːrɔ]

Verb

gȳrō (present infinitive gȳrāre, perfect active gȳrāvī, supine gȳrātum); first conjugation

  1. I turn in a circle, wheel around, rotate.
  2. I circle, revolve around.

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • congȳrō
  • gȳrātus

Related terms

  • gȳrus

Descendants

References

  • gyro in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gyro in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French gyroscope, coined in 1852 by physicist Leon Foucault, equivalent to gyro- +‎ -scope, from Ancient Greek γῦρος (gûros, circle) and σκοπός (skopós, watcher).

Noun

gyroscope (plural gyroscopes)

  1. an apparatus composed of a wheel which spins inside of a frame (gimbal) and causes the balancing of the frame in any direction or position. In the form of a gyroscopic stabilizer, used to help keep aircraft and ships steady.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • gyroscopy

Translations

See also

  • INS

Further reading

  • gyroscope at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • gyroscope on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

gyro- +‎ -scope, coined in 1852 by physicist Leon Foucault, from Ancient Greek γῦρος (gûros, circle) and σκοπός (skopós, watcher).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒi.ʁɔs.kɔp/

Noun

gyroscope m (plural gyroscopes)

  1. gyroscope

Derived terms

  • gyroscopique
  • gyroscopiquement

Further reading

  • “gyroscope” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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