habit vs wont what difference

what is difference between habit and wont

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhæbɪt/
  • (weak vowel merger) IPA(key): /ˈhæbət/
  • Rhymes: -æbɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English habit, from Latin habitus (condition, bearing, state, appearance, dress, attire), from habeō (I have, hold, keep). Replaced Middle English abit, from Old French abit, itself from the same Latin source. Displaced native Old English þēaw.

Noun

habit (countable and uncountable, plural habits)

  1. An action performed on a regular basis.
    Synonym: wont
    • a man of very shy, retired habits
  2. An action performed repeatedly and automatically, usually without awareness.
  3. A long piece of clothing worn by monks and nuns.
  4. A piece of clothing worn uniformly for a specific activity.
  5. (archaic) Outward appearance; attire; dress.
    • There are, among the statues, several of Venus, in different habits.
  6. (botany, mineralogy) Form of growth or general appearance of a variety or species of plant or crystal.
  7. An addiction.
Related terms
  • exhibit
  • habitual
  • habituate
  • habitus
  • inhibit
  • prohibit
Derived terms
  • eating habit
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English habiten, from Old French habiter, from Latin habitāre, present active infinitive of habitō (I dwell, abide, keep), frequentative of habeō (I have, hold, keep); see have.

Verb

habit (third-person singular simple present habits, present participle habiting, simple past and past participle habited)

  1. (transitive) To clothe.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To inhabit.
Related terms
  • habitat
  • habitation
Translations

Further reading

  • habit in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • habit in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Ba’thi

Albanian

Etymology

According to Orel, borrowed from a South Slavic language and ultimately derived from Proto-Slavic *xabiti (to spoil, to waste). Compare Old Church Slavonic хабити (xabiti), Serbo-Croatian habiti (damage, destroy), and Bulgarian хабя (habja, destroy, spend; blunt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haˈbit/

Verb

habit (first-person singular past tense habita, participle habitur)

  1. I surprise
  2. I astonish
  3. (Gheg; northern Albania and Kosovo) I distract, confuse
Derived terms
  • habi
  • habitshëm
  • habitur
  • habitje
  • habitore

References


French

Etymology

From Old French habit, abit, borrowed from Latin habitus.

Pronunciation

  • (mute h) IPA(key): /a.bi/

Noun

habit m (plural habits)

  1. article of clothing, garment, dress-coat, evening dress, tails, full dress

Derived terms

  • l’habit ne fait pas le moine
  • prendre l’habit

Related terms

  • habiller
  • habillement

Descendants

  • German: Habit

Further reading

  • “habit” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Noun

habit m (oblique plural habiz or habitz, nominative singular habiz or habitz, nominative plural habit)

  1. Alternative form of abit

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxa.bʲit/

Noun

habit m inan

  1. habit (clothing worn by monks and nuns)

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wəʊnt/, /wɒnt/
  • (General American) enPR: wŏnt, wônt, wōnt, wŭnt, IPA(key): /wɑnt/, /wɔnt/, /woʊnt/, /wʌnt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊnt
  • Homophone: want (some pronunciations)
  • Homophone: won’t (some pronunciations)

Etymology 1

Origin uncertain; apparently a conflation of wone (custom, habit, practice) and wont (participle adjective, below). Compare German Low German Gewohnte (custom, habit) and Dutch gewoonte. Likely related to wone, wonder, wean, and win, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to wish for, strive for, pursue; to succeed, win); more there.

(Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

wont (usually uncountable, plural wonts)

  1. (archaic) One’s habitual way of doing things; custom, habit, practice.
    • 2001, Orhan Pamuk; Erdağ M. Göknar, transl., “I am Called Black”, in My Name Is Red, London: Faber and Faber, →ISBN; paperback edition, London: Faber and Faber, 2002, →ISBN, page 62:
      With a simple-minded desire, and to rid my mind of this irrepressible urge, I retired to a corner of the room, as was my wont, but after a while I realized I couldn’t jack off—proof well enough that I’d fallen in love again after twelve years!
Translations
See also
  • meo more

Etymology 2

From Middle English wont, iwoned, from Old English ġewunod, past participle of ġewunian. The verb is derived from the adjective.

Adjective

wont (not comparable)

  1. Accustomed or used (to or with a thing), accustomed or apt (to do something).
    • c. 1580, Edmund Spenser, “The Teares of the Mvses[: Thalia]”, in Complaints: Containing Sundrie Small Poemes of the Worlds Vanitie. VVhereof the Next Page Maketh Mention, London: Imprinted for VVilliam Ponsonbie, dwelling in Paules Churchyard at the signe of the Bishops head, published 1591, →OCLC; republished in “The Teares of the Mvses[: Thalia]”, in The Faerie Qveen: The Shepheards Calendar: Together with the Other Works of England’s Arch-Pöet, Edm. Spenser: Collected into One Volume, and Carefully Corrected, London: Printed by H[umphrey] L[ownes] for Mathew Lownes, 1617, →OCLC:
      What be the ſweet delights of learning a treaſure, / That wont with Comick ſock to beautify / The painted Theaters, and fill with pleaſure / The liſtners eyes, and eares with melodie; []
Derived terms
  • unwont
  • use and wont
  • wontly
Translations
See also
  • prone to
  • used to

Verb

wont (third-person singular simple present wonts, present participle wonting, simple past and past participle wonted)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To make (someone) used to; to accustom.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To be accustomed (to something), to be in the habit (of doing something).
    • 1751, [Thomas Gray], An Elegy Wrote in a Country Church-yard, London: Printed for R[obert] Dodsley in Pall-Mall; and sold by M[ary] Cooper in Pater-noster-Row, →OCLC; republished as “An Elegy Written in a Country Church Yard”, in A Collection of Poems in Six Volumes. By Several Hands, volume IV, 2nd edition, London: Printed by J. Hughs, for R[obert] and J[ames] Dodsley, at Tully’s-Head in Pall-Mall, 1758, →OCLC, page 5:
      On ſome fond breaſt the parting ſoul relies, / Some pious drops the cloſing eye requires; / Ev’n from the tomb the voice of Nature cries, / Ev’n in our Aſhes live their wonted Fires.
Translations

Anagrams

  • Town, nowt, town

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • wonte, wontt, woont

Etymology

From Old English wand, wond, from Proto-Germanic *wanduz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wɔnt/, /wɔːnt/

Noun

wont (plural wontes)

  1. mole (Talpa europea)
    Synonyms: moldewarpe, molle

Descendants

  • English: want (dialectal)
  • Scots: want

References

  • “wont(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

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