hachure vs hatch what difference

what is difference between hachure and hatch

English

Etymology

From French hachure (crosshatching), from hacher (to hatch).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /hæʃˈjʊə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /hæˈʃʊɹ/

Noun

hachure (plural hachures)

  1. (cartography, chiefly historical) A line on a map indicating the steepness of a slope.

Usage notes

  • Unlike contour lines, hachures are drawn in the direction of the slope and their thickness and closeness is used to represent the relief with shading. They are no longer used on most modern maps.

Translations

Verb

hachure (third-person singular simple present hachures, present participle hachuring, simple past and past participle hachured)

  1. To mark a map with hachures.

French

Etymology

hacher +‎ -ure

Pronunciation

  • (aspirated h) IPA(key): /a.ʃyʁ/
  • Rhymes: -yʁ

Noun

hachure f (plural hachures)

  1. A crosshatching line.
  2. (cartography) A mapping hachure or the technique itself.
  3. (rare) Something minced.

Derived terms

  • hachurer

Further reading

  • “hachure” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hăch, IPA(key): /hætʃ/
  • Hyphenation: hatch
  • Rhymes: -ætʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English hacche, hache, from Old English hæċ, from Proto-West Germanic *hakkju (compare Dutch hek ‘gate, railing’, Low German Heck ‘pasture gate, farmyard gate’), variant of *haggju ‘hedge’. More at hedge.

Noun

hatch (plural hatches)

  1. A horizontal door in a floor or ceiling.
  2. A trapdoor.
  3. An opening in a wall at window height for the purpose of serving food or other items. A pass through.
  4. A small door in large mechanical structures and vehicles such as aircraft and spacecraft often provided for access for maintenance.
  5. (nautical) An opening through the deck of a ship or submarine
  6. (slang) A gullet.
  7. A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.
  8. A floodgate; a sluice gate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)
  9. (Scotland) A bedstead.
  10. (mining) An opening into, or in search of, a mine.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

hatch (third-person singular simple present hatches, present participle hatching, simple past and past participle hatched)

  1. (transitive) To close with a hatch or hatches.

Etymology 2

From Middle English hacche, hacchen (to propagate), from Old English hæċċan, āhaċċian (to peck out; hatch), from Proto-Germanic *hakjaną.

Cognate with German hecken ‘to breed, spawn’, Danish hække (to hatch), Swedish häcka (to breed); akin to Latvian kakale ‘penis’.

Verb

hatch (third-person singular simple present hatches, present participle hatching, simple past and past participle hatched)

  1. (intransitive) (of young animals) To emerge from an egg.
  2. (intransitive) (of eggs) To break open when a young animal emerges from it.
  3. (transitive) To incubate eggs; to cause to hatch.
  4. (transitive) To devise.
Derived terms
  • hatchling
Translations
References

Noun

hatch (plural hatches)

  1. The act of hatching.
  2. (figuratively) Development; disclosure; discovery.
  3. (poultry) A group of birds that emerged from eggs at a specified time.
  4. (often as mayfly hatch) The phenomenon, lasting 1–2 days, of large clouds of mayflies appearing in one location to mate, having reached maturity.
    • a. 1947, Edward R. Hewitt, quoted in 1947, Charles K. Fox, Redistribution of the Green Drake, 1997, Norm Shires, Jim Gilford (editors), Limestone Legends, page 104,
      The Willowemoc above Livington Manor had the largest mayfly hatch I ever knew about fifty years ago.
  5. (informal) A birth, the birth records (in the newspaper) — compare the phrase “hatched, matched, and dispatched.”
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle French hacher (to chop, slice up, incise with fine lines), from Old French hacher, hachier, from Frankish *hakōn, *hakkōn, from Proto-Germanic *hakkōną (to chop; hack). More at hack.

Verb

hatch (third-person singular simple present hatches, present participle hatching, simple past and past participle hatched)

  1. (transitive) To shade an area of (a drawing, diagram, etc.) with fine parallel lines, or with lines which cross each other (cross-hatch).
    • Those hatching strokes of the pencil.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep.
    • His weapon hatch’d in blood.
Translations

See also

  • Hatch End

Further reading

  • Hatch in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Thach, tchah

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