hack vs hacker what difference

what is difference between hack and hacker

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hæk/
  • Rhymes: -æk

Etymology 1

From Middle English hacken, hakken, from Old English *haccian (to hack); attested in tōhaccian (to hack to pieces), from Proto-Germanic *hakkōną (to chop; hoe; hew), from Proto-Indo-European *keg-, *keng- (to be sharp; peg; hook; handle).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian häkje (to hack), West Frisian hakje (to hack), Dutch hakken (to chop up; hack), German hacken (to chop; hack; hoe), Danish hakke (to chop), Swedish hacka (to hack; chop), French hacher (to chop).

The computer senses date back to at least 1955 when it initially referred to creative problem solving. By 1963, the negative connotations of “black hat” or malicious hacking had become associated with telephone hacking (cf. phreaking).

Verb

hack (third-person singular simple present hacks, present participle hacking, simple past and past participle hacked)

  1. (transitive) To chop or cut down in a rough manner. [circa 12th c.]
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 6
      Among other things he found a sharp hunting knife, on the keen blade of which he immediately proceeded to cut his finger. Undaunted he continued his experiments, finding that he could hack and hew splinters of wood from the table and chairs with this new toy.
  2. (intransitive) To cough noisily. [19th c.]
  3. To withstand or put up with a difficult situation. [20th c.]
  4. (computing) To make a quick code change to patch a computer program, often one that, while being effective, is inelegant or makes the program harder to maintain.
    Synonyms: frob, tweak
  5. (computing) To accomplish a difficult programming task.
  6. (computing, slang, transitive) To work with something on an intimately technical level.
  7. (transitive, colloquial, by extension) To apply a trick, shortcut, skill, or novelty method to something to increase productivity, efficiency or ease.
  8. (transitive, slang, computing) To hack into; to gain unauthorized access to (a computer system, e.g., a website, or network) by manipulating code.
    Synonym: crack
  9. (transitive, slang, computing, by extension) To gain unauthorised access to a computer or online account belonging to (a person or organisation).
  10. (ice hockey) To strike an opponent with one’s hockey stick, typically on the leg but occasionally and more seriously on the back, arm, head, etc.
  11. (ice hockey) To make a flailing attempt to hit the puck with a hockey stick.
  12. (baseball) To swing at a pitched ball.
  13. (soccer and rugby) To kick (a player) on the shins.
    • 2019, Barney Ronay, Liverpool’s waves of red fury and recklessness end in joyous bedlam (in The Guardian, 8 May 2019)[3]
      Barcelona had been harried and hurried and stretched thin by the midway point in the second half. Tackles flew in. Toes were crushed, shins barked, ankles hacked.
  14. To strike in a frantic movement.
  15. (transitive) To strike lightly as part of tapotement massage.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

hack (countable and uncountable, plural hacks)

  1. A tool for chopping. [14th c.]
  2. A hacking blow. [19th c.]
  3. A gouge or notch made by such a blow.
  4. A dry cough.
  5. A hacking; a catch in speaking; a short, broken cough.
    • 1660, Henry More, An Explanation of the Grand Mystery of Godliness
      he speaks to this very question: which he does with so many hacks and hesitations
  6. (figuratively) A try, an attempt. [19th c.]
  7. (curling) The foothold traditionally cut into the ice from which the person who throws the rock pushes off for delivery.
  8. (obsolete) A mattock or a miner’s pickaxe.
  9. (informal) An improvised device or solution to a problem.
  10. (computing, slang) An expedient, temporary solution, such as a small patch or change to code, meant to be replaced with a more elegant solution at a later date; a workaround.
  11. (computing, slang) A computer programmer who makes quick but inelegant changes to computer code to solve problems or add features.
  12. (computing, slang) A computer programmer, particularly a veteran or someone not immediately expected to be capable of programming.
  13. (computing, slang) An interesting technical achievement, particularly in computer programming.
  14. (colloquial) A trick, shortcut, skill, or novelty method to increase productivity, efficiency or ease.
  15. (computing, slang) An illegal attempt to gain access to a computer network.
  16. (computing, slang) A video game or any computer software that has been altered from its original state.
    • 2014, Clara Fernández-Vara, Introduction to Game Analysis (page 165)
      [] found out a discarded sex mini-game in the code, and made it available again in the modified PC version of the game that they nicknamed “Hot Coffee.” This hack of the game created a controversy, since the inclusion of sexual content would change its age rating, []
  17. (slang, military) Time check.
  18. (ice hockey) The act of striking an opponent with one’s hockey stick, typically on the leg but occasionally and more seriously on the back, arm, head, etc.
  19. (baseball) A swing of the bat at a pitched ball by the batter, particularly a choppy, ungraceful one that misses the ball such as at a fastball.
  20. A kick on the shins in football of any type.
    • 1857, Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown’s School Days.
  21. (uncountable, slang, naval) Confinement of an officer to their stateroom as a punishment.
    • 2013, David Cauthen, When Destiny Comes to a Fork in the Road, p. 426:
      “Lieutenant Cauthen, you’ve got ten seconds to explain yourself before I put you in hack!”
  22. (military, slang) An airplane of poor quality or in poor condition.
    • 1952, Air Reservist (page 6)
      Henebry’s planes returned to Japan to reload, and early in the morning brought almost 3,000 more troopers to Korea [] Before sunrise next day, all troops in the maneuver had been picked up again and airlifted in “Henebry Hacks” back to Japan.
    • 1967, Christian Advocate (volume 47, page 292)
      [] so that he had to make the 300-mile journey in a “hack” plane which had spluttering engines, which did not conduce to an easy mind nor to a comfortable journey; []
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:hack.
Synonyms
  • (access attempt): crack
  • (an illegal means to gain advantage): exploit
  • (expedient, temporary solution): band-aid, contrivance, improvision, improvisation, kludge, makeshift, quick fix, patch
  • (trick to increase productivity or efficiency): lifehack
Related terms
  • marginal hacks
Translations

Etymology 2

Variations of hatch, heck.

Noun

hack (plural hacks)

  1. (falconry) A board which the falcon’s food is placed on; used by extension for the state of partial freedom in which they are kept before being trained.
  2. A food-rack for cattle.
  3. A rack used to dry something, such as bricks, fish, or cheese.
  4. A grating in a mill race.

Verb

hack (third-person singular simple present hacks, present participle hacking, simple past and past participle hacked)

  1. To lay (bricks) on a rack to dry.
  2. (falconry) To keep (young hawks) in a state of partial freedom, before they are trained.

Etymology 3

Abbreviation of hackney (an ordinary horse), probably from place name Hackney.

Noun

hack (plural hacks)

  1. A horse for hire, especially one which is old and tired. [from 16th c.]
  2. A person, often a journalist, hired to do routine work. [from 17th c.]
  3. (derogatory) Someone who is available for hire; hireling, mercenary.
  4. (slang) A taxicab (hackney cab) driver.
  5. (now chiefly Canada, US, colloquial) A vehicle let for hire; originally, a hackney coach, now typically a taxicab. [from 17th c.]
  6. A hearse.
    • 1920s, Jimmie Rodgers, Frankie and Johnny
      Bring out the rubber-tired buggie/Bring out the rubber-tired hack/I’m takin’ my Johnny to the graveyard/But I ain’t gonna bring him back
  7. (derogatory, authorship) An untalented writer.
  8. (derogatory) One who is professionally successful despite producing mediocre work. (Usually applied to persons in a creative field.)
  9. (derogatory) A talented writer-for-hire, paid to put others’ thoughts into felicitous language.
  10. (politics) A political agitator. (slightly derogatory)
  11. (obsolete) A writer who hires himself out for any sort of literary work; an overworked man; a drudge.
    • 1767, Oliver Goldsmith, Epitaph on Edward Purdon
      Here lies poor Ned Purdon, from misery freed, / Who long was a bookseller’s hack.
  12. (obsolete) A procuress.
Synonyms
  • (A saddle horse which is old and tired): nag
Coordinate terms
  • (worthless horse): bum
Translations

Verb

hack (third-person singular simple present hacks, present participle hacking, simple past and past participle hacked)

  1. (dated) To make common or cliched; to vulgarise.
  2. (equestrianism) To ride a horse at a regular pace; to ride on a road (as opposed to riding cross-country etc.).
  3. (obsolete) To be exposed or offered or to common use for hire; to turn prostitute.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hanmer to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete) To live the life of a drudge or hack.
    • 1765, Oliver Goldsmith, The Double Transformation
      Poor madam , now condemn’d to hack
      The rest of life with anxious Jack
  5. To use as a hack; to let out for hire.
  6. To use frequently and indiscriminately, so as to render trite and commonplace.
    • 1865, John Henry Newman, An Internal Argument for Christianity
      The word “remarkable” has been so hacked of late.

Etymology 4

From hackysack

Noun

hack (plural hacks)

  1. A small ball usually made of woven cotton or suede and filled with rice, sand or some other filler, for use in hackeysack.
Translations

Verb

hack (third-person singular simple present hacks, present participle hacking, simple past and past participle hacked)

  1. To play hackeysack.
Translations

Further reading

  • hack on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • hack at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • hack in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

References


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English hack.

Pronunciation

  • (Netherlands) IPA(key): /ɦɛk/
  • Hyphenation: hack
  • Rhymes: -ɛk
  • Homophone: hek

Noun

hack m (plural hacks, diminutive hackje n)

  1. hack (exploit; illegitimate attempt to gain access)

Related terms

  • hacken
  • hacker


English

Etymology

From Middle English hakker, hackere, hakkere, equivalent to hack +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /hækə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ækə(r)

Noun

hacker (plural hackers)

  1. (computing) One who is expert at programming and solving problems with a computer.
    • 1984, Venture, volume 6, part 1, page 142:
      A hacker starts with nothing but a dream and a floppy disk and presently finds himself in a business that’s doubled and trebled. Three “diskzines” — magazines on floppy disks — started cheaply by entrepreneurs who placed ads in obscure computer journals []
  2. (computing) One who uses a computer to gain unauthorized access to data, or to carry out malicious attacks.
    Synonym: (outside US) cracker
    • 2007, Committee on Improving Cybersecurity Research in the United States, Toward a Safer and More Secure Cyberspace
      Typically, one hacker will annoy another; the offended party replies by launching a denial-of-service attack against the offender.
  3. (computing) A computer security professional.
  4. Something that hacks; a tool or device for hacking.
    • 1825?, “Hannah Limbrick, Executed for Murder”, in The Newgate Calendar: comprising interesting memoirs of the most notorious characters, page 231:
      Thomas Limbrick, who was only nine years of age, said he lived with his mother when Deborah was beat: that his mother throwed her down all along with her hands; and then against a wall, and kicked her in the belly: that afterwards she picked her up, and beat her with the hacker on the side of the head; wiped the blood off with a dish-clout, and took her up to bed after she was dead.
    • July 1846, John Macleod, “The Tar and Turpentine Business of North Carolina”, on page 15 of the Monthly Journal of Agriculture, volume II, number 1:
      When the dipping is thus over, the next work is to “chip” or scarify the tree immediately over the box […]. This is done by an instrument usually called a “hacker,” sometimes “shave.” Its form is somewhat like a “round shave,” narrowing at the cutting place to the diameter of an inch, with a shank, to be fixed securely into a strong, heavy handle of about two feet in length, while the faces of the trees are low, but the handle is made longer as years advance the faces higher.
    • 1877, Reports and Awards of the United States Centennial Commission (regarding the) International Exhibition, 1876 (Francis A. Walker, editor), Reports on Awards, Group XXI, page 13:
      23. George C. howard, Philadelphia, U.S.
      GRINDSTONE HACKER.
      Report.–Commended for the contrivance of an instrument, called a “hacker,” that is used in trimming grindstones. This hacker turns with the stone, and is drawn across in a slide rest, and fulfills its important function satisfactorily.
  5. (Britain, regional) A fork-shaped tool used to harvest root vegetables.
    • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, Chapter 43,[2]
      The upper half of each turnip had been eaten off by the live-stock, and it was the business of the two women to grub up the lower or earthy half of the root with a hooked fork called a hacker, that it might be eaten also.
    • 1893, George Edward Dartnell and Edward Hungerford Goddard, A Glossary of Words Used in the County of Wiltshire, London: English Dialect Society, p. 72,[3]
      [] a ‘tater-hacker,’ an old three-grained garden-fork, which by bending down the tines or ‘grains’ at right angles to the handle has been converted into something resembling a rake, but used as a hoe.
  6. Someone who hacks.
    1. Particularly, one who cuts with rough or heavy blows.
      • 1902, Our Wonderful Progress, Trumbull White (editor), page 623–624:
        In January or February the “hacker,” with his keen-bladed ax, begins the round which ends the season. […] About a quart of sap is taken from each box by means of the trowel-shaped scoop used by the dipper, and then the hacker comes along and starts the flow afresh by wounding the tree again.
    2. Particularly, one who kicks wildly or roughly.
    3. Particularly, one who is consistent and focuses on accomplishing a task or several tasks.
  7. (US) One who is inexperienced or unskilled at a particular activity, especially a sport such as golf or tennis.
    • 1969, Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five, New York: Dial, 2005, Chapter 4, p. 108,[4]
      And then Billy was a middle-aged optometrist again, playing hacker’s golf this time—on a blazing summer Sunday morning.
  8. (US) One who operates a taxicab.

Usage notes

  • There are significantly more meanings of the word within the United States than in other English speaking nations.
  • The use of the word hacker to indicate a person who displays skill, particularly with computers, may be misunderstood as implying the narrow meaning of unauthorised intrusion into electronic systems (also known as a cracker or occasionally black hat). This serious misunderstanding in the field of computer expertise is perhaps particularly common outside the United States.
  • Some computer enthusiasts object to the use of hacker for a person who breaks into computer systems, preferring cracker for this sense.
  • Most recently there has been a tendency to use hacker in a positive sense in other domains: growth hacker, food hacker, sex hacker, etc.

Descendants

Translations

Further reading

  • hacker on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Hacker’s dictionary definition of hacker US only
  • RFC1392 – Internet Users’ Glossary, Jan 1993

References


Czech

Etymology

English hacker

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦɛkr̩]

Noun

hacker m

  1. hacker (one who uses a computer to gain unauthorized access to data, or to carry out malicious attacks)

Derived terms

  • hackerský
  • hackerství

Further reading

  • hacker in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English hacker, equivalent to hacke +‎ -er

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhaɡ̊ɐ]

Noun

hacker

  1. (computing) hacker

Declension

Verb

hacker

  1. present of hacke

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English hacker.

Pronunciation

  • (Netherlands) IPA(key): /ˈɦɛ.kər)/
  • Hyphenation: hac‧ker
  • Rhymes: -ɛkər

Noun

hacker m (plural hackers)

  1. A hacker.

Related terms

  • hack
  • hacken

French

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From English hacker.

Noun

hacker m (plural hackers)

  1. (computing) hacker
    Synonym: hackeur

Etymology 2

English hack +‎ -er

Verb

hacker

  1. (computing) To hack
Conjugation

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • hekker

Etymology

Borrowed from English hacker.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɛkːɛr]
  • Hyphenation: ha‧cker
  • Rhymes: -ɛr

Noun

hacker (plural hackerek)

  1. (computing) hacker (one who is expert at programming and solving problems with a computer)
  2. (computing) hacker (one who uses a computer to gain unauthorized access to data, or to carry out malicious attacks)

Declension


Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English hacker.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈha.keɾ/

Noun

hacker m, f (plural hackers)

  1. (computing) hacker (one who is expert at programming and solving problems with a computer)
  2. (computing) hacker (one who uses a computer to gain unauthorised access to data)

Derived terms

  • hackear

Spanish

Noun

hacker m or f (plural hackers or hacker)

  1. Alternative form of hácker

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