hale vs pressure what difference

what is difference between hale and pressure

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /heɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: hail

Etymology 1

From Middle English hele, hæle, from Old English hǣlu, hǣl, from Proto-Germanic *hailį̄ (salvation, health), a noun-derivative of Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, healthy). Cognate with Scots haill, hale (health), German Heil (salvation, well-being).

Noun

hale (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Health, welfare.
    • c. 1515–1516, published 1568, John Skelton, Againſt venemous tongues enpoyſoned with ſclaunder and falſe detractions &c.:
      Then let them vale a bonet of their proud ſayle,
      And of their taunting toies reſt with il hayle.
    • 1595, Edmund Spenser, Astrophel: A Pastorall Elegy upon the Death of the Most Noble and Valorous Knight, Sir Philip Sidney
      all heedless of his dearest hale
Translations

Etymology 2

From Northern Middle English hal, hale, variants of hole (healthy; safe; whole) (whence whole), from Middle English hāl, from Proto-West Germanic *hail, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole; entire; healthy). See whole for more.

Adjective

hale (comparative haler, superlative halest)

  1. (dated) Sound, entire, healthy; robust, not impaired.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, On the Death of Dr. Swift
      Last year we thought him strong and hale.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      “Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow,” quoth Robin, “thou seemest happy this merry morn.”
      “Ay, that am I,” quoth the jolly Butcher, “and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?”
Usage notes
  • Now rather uncommon, except in the stock phrase hale and hearty.
Antonyms
  • unhale
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English halen, from Anglo-Norman haler, from Old Dutch *halon (compare Dutch halen), from Proto-Germanic *halōną (compare Old English ġeholian, West Frisian helje, German holen), from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- (to lift) (compare Latin ex-cellō (to surpass), Tocharian B käly- (to stand, stay), Albanian qell (to halt, hold up, carry), Lithuanian kélti (to raise up), Ancient Greek κελέοντες (keléontes, upright beam on a loom)). Doublet of haul.

Verb

hale (third-person singular simple present hales, present participle haling, simple past and past participle haled)

  1. To drag or pull, especially forcibly.
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial, 2007, page 262:
      They will hale the King to Paris, and have him under their eye.
Translations

Anagrams

  • Aleh, Heal, Hela, Leah, heal

Alemannic German

Etymology

From Old High German *halēn. Compare Icelandic hallur (steep), from Old Norse hallr (rock, stone), from Proto-Germanic *halluz (rock, stone; rockface, cliff).

Verb

hale

  1. (Uri) to be steep

References

  • Abegg, Emil, (1911) Die Mundart von Urseren (Beiträge zur Schweizerdeutschen Grammatik. IV.) [The Dialect of Urseren], Frauenfeld, Switzerland: Huber & Co., page 35.

Central Franconian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhaːlə/

Verb

hale (third-person singular present hält, past tense heelt or hielt, past participle jehale or gehale or gehal)

  1. Alternative spelling of haale

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haːlə/, [ˈhæːlə]

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hali.

Noun

hale c (singular definite halen, plural indefinite haler)

  1. tail, brush, scut
  2. bottom, fanny
Inflection

Etymology 2

From late Old Norse hala, from Middle Low German halen.

Verb

hale (imperative hal, infinitive at hale, present tense haler, past tense halede, perfect tense har halet)

  1. haul, heave, pull
  2. drag

Further reading

  • hale on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

hale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of halen

French

Verb

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

Anagrams

  • héla

Galician

Verb

hale

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of halar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of halar

Hawaiian

Etymology

From Proto-Polynesian *fale, from Proto-Central Pacific *vale, from Proto-Oceanic *pale, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈha.le/, [ˈhɐle]

Noun

hale

  1. house, building
  2. institution
  3. lodge
  4. station, hall

Verb

hale

  1. to have a house

Derived terms

  • hoʻohale

References

  • “hale” in the Hawaiian Dictionary, Revised and Enlarged Edition, University of Hawaii Press, 1986

Middle English

Etymology 1

From a form of Old English halh without the final -h; compare hāle (dative). Doublet of halgh (attested only in placenames), whence English haugh.

Noun

hale (plural hales)

  1. corner, nook, cranny, hiding place
Alternative forms
  • hal
Descendants
  • English: hale

References

  • “hāle, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From Anglo-Norman hale, halle, from Latin halla (house, dwelling; court; palace; market hall), from Frankish *hallu, from Proto-Germanic *hallō (hall). Doublet of halle (hall).

Noun

hale (plural hales)

  1. hale (temporary structure for housing, entertaining, eating meals, etc.)
Alternative forms
  • halle
Descendants
  • English: hale

References

  • “hāle, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 3

Verb

hale

  1. Alternative form of haylen (to hail)

Etymology 4

Noun

hale (plural hales)

  1. Alternative form of halle (hall)

Etymology 5

Noun

hale (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of hayle (hail)

Etymology 6

Adjective

hale

  1. Alternative form of hole (healthy, whole)

Etymology 7

Adjective

hale

  1. Alternative form of holy (holy)

Norman

Verb

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hali.

Noun

hale m (definite singular halen, indefinite plural haler, definite plural halene)

  1. a tail (of an animal, aircraft, comet etc.)
Derived terms
Related terms
  • stjert

Etymology 2

From late Old Norse hala, from Middle Low German halen.

Verb

hale (present tense haler, past tense halte, past participle halt)

  1. to haul, heave, pull
  2. to drag

References

  • “hale” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse hali.

Noun

hale m (definite singular halen, indefinite plural halar, definite plural halane)

  1. a tail (of an animal, aircraft, comet etc.)

Derived terms

  • halefinne
  • halelaus
  • hestehale
  • tverrhalehauk

Related terms

  • stjert

References

  • “hale” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxa.lɛ/

Noun

hale f

  1. nominative plural of hala
  2. accusative plural of hala
  3. vocative plural of hala

Spanish

Verb

hale

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of halar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of halar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of halar.


English

Etymology

From Old French, from Latin pressūra.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: prĕshʹ-ə(r), IPA(key): /ˈpɹɛʃə(ɹ)/
    • (UK) IPA(key): [ˈpɹɛʃ.ə(ɹ)]
    • (US) IPA(key): [ˈpɹɛʃ.ɚ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: pres‧sure

Noun

pressure (countable and uncountable, plural pressures)

  1. A pressing; a force applied to a surface.
    Apply pressure to the wound to stop the bleeding.
  2. A contrasting force or impulse of any kind
    the pressure of poverty; the pressure of taxes; the pressure of motives on the mind; the pressure of civilization.
  3. Distress.
    • 1649, Eikon Basilike
      My people’s pressures are grievous.
    • October 31, 1708, Francis Atterbury, a sermon preach’d before the Queen at St. James’s
      In the midst of his great troubles and pressures.
  4. Urgency
    the pressure of business
  5. (obsolete) Impression; stamp; character impressed.
  6. (physics) The amount of force that is applied over a given area divided by the size of this area.

Synonyms

  • (distress): affliction, grievance
  • (urgency): press

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

pressure (third-person singular simple present pressures, present participle pressuring, simple past and past participle pressured)

  1. (transitive) To encourage or heavily exert force or influence.
    Do not let anyone pressure you into buying something you do not want.

Translations

See also

  • (units of pressure): pascal (Pa); bar, barye (Ba); pounds per square inch (psi, lbf/in2, lb/in2), torr, mmHg, atmosphere (atm)

Anagrams

  • perusers

French

Pronunciation

  • Homophones: pressurent, pressures

Verb

pressure

  1. first-person singular present indicative of pressurer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of pressurer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of pressurer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of pressurer
  5. second-person singular imperative of pressurer

Latin

Participle

pressūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of pressūrus

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin pressūra.

Noun

pressure f (oblique plural pressures, nominative singular pressure, nominative plural pressures)

  1. pressure (action or result of pressing)

Descendants

  • English: pressure

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