hammock vs mound what difference

what is difference between hammock and mound

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish hamaca, from Taíno *hamaka (compare Arawak hamaka, Wayuu jama’a), from Proto-Arawak *hamaka. Columbus, in the narrative of his first voyage, says: “A great many Indians in canoes came to the ship to-day for the purpose of bartering their cotton, and hamacas, or nets, in which they sleep.”

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhæmək/

Noun

hammock (plural hammocks)

  1. A swinging couch or bed, usually made of netting or canvas about six feet wide, suspended by clews or cords at the ends.
    • 1638 Herbert, Sir Thomas Some years travels into divers parts of Asia and Afrique
      …the poore ſaylers, who…commonly get forthwith into their beds (or hamackoes) reſting their tyred bodies…
  2. (US, archaic outside dialects) A piece of land thickly wooded, and usually covered with bushes and vines.

Derived terms

  • hammock nettings

Translations

Verb

hammock (third-person singular simple present hammocks, present participle hammocking, simple past and past participle hammocked)

  1. (intransitive) To lie in a hammock.
    • {{quote-book|en|1901|Yone Noguchi|title=The American Diary of a Japanese Girl (wiki article)
  2. (transitive, of a cloth) To hang in a way that resembles a hammock.
    • 2013, Mary Jo Putney, Patricia Rice, Susan King, Christmas Roses: Love Blooms in Winter
      “She hammocked their plaids between the table and the bed, then edged her way past Kenneth as she approached the central hearth.”
  3. (transitive) To make something be wrapped tight, like in a hammock.
    • 1960, John D. MacDonald, The Only Girl in the Game
      “She hammocked her breasts into her bra, snapped it, hitched at it, and gave herself a profile glance in the mirror.”

Further reading

  • hammock on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Swedish

Noun

hammock c

  1. hammock

Declension


English

Etymology

From earlier meaning “hedge, fence”, from Middle English mound, mund (protection, boundary, raised earthen rampart), from Old English mund (hand, hand of protection, protector, guardianship), from Proto-Germanic *mundō (hand), *munduz (protection, patron), from Proto-Indo-European *mh₂-nt-éh₂ (the beckoning one), from *men-, *man-, *mar- (hand). Cognate with Old Frisian mund (guardianship), Old High German munt (hand, protection) (German Mündel (ward), Vormund (a guardian)), Old Norse mund (hand) (Icelandic mund), Middle Dutch mond (protection), Latin manus (hand), Ancient Greek μάρη (márē, hand).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Noun

mound (plural mounds)

  1. An artificial hill or elevation of earth; a raised bank; an embankment thrown up for defense
    Synonyms: bulwark, rampart
  2. A natural elevation appearing as if thrown up artificially; a regular and isolated hill, hillock, or knoll.
  3. (baseball) Elevated area of dirt upon which the pitcher stands to pitch.
  4. A ball or globe forming part of the regalia of an emperor or other sovereign. It is encircled with bands, enriched with precious stones, and surmounted with a cross.
  5. (US, vulgar, slang) The mons veneris.
  6. (obsolete, anatomy, measurement, figuratively) A hand.
  7. (obsolete) A protection; restraint; curb.
  8. (obsolete) A helmet.
  9. (obsolete) Might; size.

Synonyms

  • (part of regalia): globus cruciger, globe, orb

Derived terms

  • shaftmound

Translations

Verb

mound (third-person singular simple present mounds, present participle mounding, simple past and past participle mounded)

  1. (transitive) To fortify with a mound; add a barrier, rampart, etc. to.
  2. (transitive) To force or pile into a mound or mounds.

Synonyms

  • (fortify with a mound): bank, bank up, bulwark, rampart
  • (pile into mounds): heap up, pile; see also Thesaurus:pile up

Derived terms

  • amound

Translations

See also

  • mound on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Mound in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Mudon, Mundo

Middle English

Noun

mound

  1. Alternative form of mund

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