Handcuffs vs Manacle what difference

what is difference between Handcuffs and Manacle

English

Etymology 1

1775, from hand +‎ cuff (end of shirtsleeve).

Possibly influenced by Old English handcops, from hand + cops (fetter, chains), but due to lack of continuity (centuries between Old English and modern term), generally analyzed as a re-invention.

Noun

handcuffs pl (plural only)

  1. A fastening consisting of two metal rings, designed to go around a person’s wrists, and connected by a chain or hinge.
    • 2014, Ian Black, “Courts kept busy as Jordan works to crush support for Isis”, The Guardian, 27 November 2014:
      Security is tight inside and outside the building, guarded by a bewildering collection of soldiers, policemen and gendarmes. Relatives watch as prisoners in handcuffs and leg irons shuffle past.
Synonyms
  • manacles
  • shackles
Related terms
  • handcuff
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

handcuffs

  1. plural of handcuff

Etymology 3

Verb

handcuffs

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of handcuff

References



English

Etymology

The noun is derived from Middle English manacle, manakelle, manakil, manakyll, manicle, manikil, manycle, manykil, manykle, from Anglo-Norman manicle, manichle (gauntlet; handle of a plough; (in plural) manacles), and Middle French manicle, Old French manicle (armlet; gauntlet; (in plural) manacles) (modern French manicle, manique (gauntlet)), from Latin manicula (handle of a plough; manacle), from manus (hand) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)meh₂- (to beckon, signal)) + -cula (from -culus, variant of -ulus (suffix forming diminutive nouns)).

The verb is probably derived from the noun, although according to the Oxford English Dictionary it is attested slightly earlier.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈmænək(ə)l/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmænəkəl/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧na‧cle

Noun

manacle (plural manacles)

  1. A shackle for the wrist, usually consisting of a pair of joined rings; a handcuff; (by extension) a similar device put around an ankle to restrict free movement.
  2. (figuratively) A fetter, a restriction.

Usage notes

Often used in the plural form manacles, and as such a plurale tantum.

Derived terms

  • manaclelike

Translations

Verb

manacle (third-person singular simple present manacles, present participle manacling, simple past and past participle manacled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To confine with manacles.

Translations

References

Further reading

  • handcuffs on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Alcmena, MacLean, Maclean, laceman

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial