handle vs palm what difference

what is difference between handle and palm

English

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhæn.dl̩/
  • Hyphenation: han‧dle
  • Rhymes: -ændəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English handel, handle, from Old English handle (a handle), from handlian (to handle, feel, deal with, discuss). See verb below. Cognate with Danish handel (a handle).

Noun

handle (plural handles)

  1. The part of an object which is (designed to be) held in the hand when used or moved.
  2. An instrument for effecting a purpose (either literally or figuratively); a tool, or an opportunity or pretext.
    • They overturned him to all his interests by the sure but fatal handle of his own good nature.
  3. (gambling) The gross amount of wagering within a given period of time or for a given event at one of more establishments.
  4. (textiles) The tactile qualities of a fabric, e.g., softness, firmness, elasticity, fineness, resilience, and other qualities perceived by touch.
  5. (slang) A name, nickname or pseudonym.
  6. (slang) A title attached to one’s name, such as Doctor or Colonel.
  7. (computing) A reference to an object or structure that can be stored in a variable.
  8. (Australia, New Zealand) A 10 fl oz (285 ml) glass of beer in the Northern Territory. (See also pot and middy for other regional variations.)
  9. (US) A half-gallon (1.75-liter) bottle of alcohol. (Called a sixty in Canada.)
    • 2014, Ray Stoeser, Josh Cuffe, Bury My Body Down By the Highway Side, page 83:
      Josh bought a fifth of Evan Williams for Andrew as a token of gratitude and Ray, because of the financial constraints, purchased the cheapest handle of whiskey he could find: Heaven Hill.
  10. (geography, Newfoundland and Labrador, rare) A point, an extremity of land.
  11. (topology) A topological space homeomorphic to a ball but viewed as a product of two lower-dimensional balls.
  12. (algebraic geometry) The smooth, irreducible subcurve of a comb which connects to each of the other components in exactly one point.
Hyponyms
  • (part of an object held in the hand when used or moved): bail (bucket, kettle, pitcher), haft (tool, weapon), hilt (sword), knob, stail (tool), stilt (plough)
Derived terms
Related terms
  • give a handle
Descendants
  • Japanese: ハンドル (handoru)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English handlen, from Old English handlian (to handle, feel, deal with, discuss), from Proto-Germanic *handlōną (to take, grip, feel), equivalent to hand +‎ -le. Cognate with West Frisian hanneljen, hanljen (to handle, treat), Dutch handelen (to handle, deal, act, negotiate), German handeln (to act, trade, negotiate, behave), Swedish handla (to buy, trade, deal), Icelandic höndla (to handle).

Verb

handle (third-person singular simple present handles, present participle handling, simple past and past participle handled)

  1. (transitive) To touch; to feel or hold with the hand(s).
    • Happy, ye leaves! when as those lilly hands […] Shall handle you.
    • Handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh.
  2. (transitive, rare) To accustom to the hand; to take care of with the hands.
    • 1679, William Temple, An essay upon the advancement of trade in Ireland.
      The hardness of the winters forces the breeders to house and handle their colts for at least six months every year.
  3. (transitive) To manage, use, or wield with the hands.
    • 1976, Mel Hallin Bolster, Crazy Snake and the Smoked Meat Rebellion, page 66
      Light on his feet for a big man, he handled the rifle like a pistol.
  4. (transitive) To manage, control, or direct.
  5. (transitive) To treat, to deal with (in a specified way).
  6. (transitive) To deal with (a subject, argument, topic, or theme) in speaking, in writing, or in art.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Envy
      We will handle what persons are apt to envy others…
  7. (transitive) To receive and transfer; to have pass through one’s hands; hence, to buy and sell.
  8. (transitive, rare) To be concerned with; to be an expert in.
  9. (transitive) To put up with; to endure (and continue to function).
    • 2014, Andrew Stellman, Jennifer Greene, Learning Agile: Understanding Scrum, XP, Lean, and Kanban →ISBN:
      For example, a program that loads data from a file needs to handle the case where that file is not found.
  10. (intransitive) To use the hands.
    • They [idols made of gold and silver] have hands, but they handle not
  11. (soccer, intransitive) To illegally touch the ball with the hand or arm; to commit handball.
  12. (intransitive) To behave in a particular way when handled (managed, controlled, directed).
Synonyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • hand
Translations

Anagrams

  • Dahlen, Handel

Alemannic German

Verb

handle

  1. (Uri) to stroke the teats of a dairy cow until they fill with milk

References

  • Abegg, Emil, (1911) Die Mundart von Urseren (Beiträge zur Schweizerdeutschen Grammatik. IV.) [The Dialect of Urseren], Frauenfeld, Switzerland: Huber & Co.

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse handla, hǫndla, from hǫnd (hand). In the sense trade influenced by from Middle Low German handelen and German handeln.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hanlə/, [ˈhanlə]

Verb

handle (imperative handl, infinitive at handle, present tense handler, past tense handlede, perfect tense har handlet)

  1. act (to do something)
  2. trade, shop

German

Verb

handle

  1. inflection of handeln:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative
    3. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse handla and German handeln

Pronunciation

Verb

handle (imperative handl or handle, present tense handler, passive handles, simple past and past participle handla or handlet, present participle handlende)

  1. to act (do something)
  2. to deal, trade, to do business
  3. to shop (visit shops)

Derived terms

  • forhandle
  • handletur
  • handling

References

  • “handle” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • handla

Etymology

From Old Norse handla and German handeln

Verb

handle (present tense handlar, past tense handla, past participle handla, passive infinitive handlast, present participle handlande, imperative handl)

  1. to act (do something)
  2. to deal, trade, to do business
  3. to shop (visit shops)

Derived terms

  • forhandle
  • handletur
  • handling

References

  • “handle” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: päm, IPA(key): /pɑːm/
  • (US) enPR: päm, pälm, IPA(key): /pɑm/, /pɑlm/, /pɔm/, /pɔlm/
  • (Ireland) IPA(key): /ˈpæm/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːm

Etymology 1

From Middle English palme, from Old English palm, palma (palm-tree, palm-branch), from Latin palma (palm-tree, palm-branch, palm of the hand), from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₂meh₂, *plām- (palm of the hand). Cognate with Dutch palm, German Palme, Danish palme, Icelandic pálmur (palm).

Noun

palm (plural palms)

  1. Any of various evergreen trees from the family Palmae or Arecaceae, which are mainly found in the tropics.
    Synonym: palm tree
  2. A branch or leaf of the palm, anciently borne or worn as a symbol of victory or rejoicing.
  3. (figuratively, by extension) Triumph; victory.
  4. (Scouting) Any of 23 awards that can be earned after obtaining the Eagle Scout rank, but generally only before turning 18 years old.
Alternative forms
  • (Scouting award): Palm
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English palme, paume, from Old French palme, paulme, paume (palm of the hand, ball, tennis), from Latin palma (palm of the hand, hand-breadth), from Proto-Indo-European *palam-, *plām- (palm of the hand). Cognate with Ancient Greek παλάμη (palámē, palm of the hand), Old English folm (palm of the hand), Old Irish lám (hand).

Noun

palm (plural palms)

  1. The inner and somewhat concave part of the human hand that extends from the wrist to the bases of the fingers.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Lancelot and Elaine
      Clench’d her fingers till they bit the palm.
    • 1990 October 28, Paul Simon, “Further to Fly”, The Rhythm of the Saints, Warner Bros.
      The open palm of desire wants everything.
    Synonym: loof
    Antonym: hardel
  2. The corresponding part of the forefoot of a lower mammal.
  3. A linear measure equal either to the breadth of the hand or to its length from the wrist to the ends of the fingers; a hand; used in measuring a horse’s height.
    • 1931, Herbert Eugene Bolton, Outpost of Empire: The Story of the Founding of San Francisco
      He found it to be ninety-five fathoms wide, and five palms deep at a place of average depth
  4. (sailmaking) A metallic disk attached to a strap and worn in the palm of the hand; used to push the needle through the canvas, in sewing sails, etc.
  5. The broad flattened part of an antler, as of a full-grown fallow deer; so called as resembling the palm of the hand with its protruding fingers.
  6. (nautical) The flat inner face of an anchor fluke.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

palm (third-person singular simple present palms, present participle palming, simple past and past participle palmed)

  1. To hold or conceal something in the palm of the hand, e.g, for an act of sleight of hand or to steal something.
  2. To hold something without bending the fingers significantly.
  3. To move something with the palm of the hand.
Derived terms
  • palm off
Translations

References

  • Palm on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Arecaceae on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Arecaceae on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons
  • Arecaceae on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • hand on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons
  • Personal digital assistant on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Anagrams

  • LAMP, Lamp, MPLA, lamp

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɑlm/
  • Hyphenation: palm
  • Rhymes: -ɑlm

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch palme, from Old Dutch palma, from Latin palma.

Noun

palm m (plural palmen, diminutive palmpje n)

  1. Any palm, (tropical tree of the family Palmae).
  2. An image of such plant
Derived terms

– various

– Species and genera of Palmae

Descendants

  • Indonesian: palem

External links

  • WNT

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch palme, from Old French palme, from Latin palma.

Noun

palm f (plural palmen, diminutive palmpje n)

  1. A palm, the flat (middle part of the hand)
    Synonym: handpalm
Derived terms
  • handpalm
  • palmslag
  • palmspier
  • palmwortel

Anagrams

  • lamp

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /palm/

Noun

palm f

  1. genitive plural of palma

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish palmber, palma, from Old Norse palmi, from Latin palma.

Pronunciation

Noun

palm c

  1. A palm, tropical tree.

Declension

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