hang vs knack what difference

what is difference between hang and knack

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hăng, IPA(key): /hæŋ/
    • (General American, Canada) IPA(key): (see /æ/ raising) [heɪŋ]
  • Rhymes: -æŋ

Etymology 1

A fusion of Old English hōn (to hang, be hanging) [intrans.] and hangian (to hang, cause to hang) [trans.]; also probably influenced by Old Norse hengja (suspend) and hanga (be suspended); all from Proto-Germanic *hanhaną (compare Dutch hangen, Low German hangen and hängen, German hängen, Norwegian Bokmål henge, Norwegian Nynorsk henga), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱenk- (to waver, be in suspense) (compare Gothic ???????????????????? (hāhan), Hittite [Term?] (/gang-/, to hang), Sanskrit शङ्कते (śáṅkate, is in doubt, hesitates), Latin cunctari (to delay)).

Verb

hang (third-person singular simple present hangs, present participle hanging, simple past and past participle hung or (legal) hanged)

  1. (intransitive) To be or remain suspended.
    • On the dark-green walls hung a series of eight engravings, portraits of early Victorian belles, clad in lace and tarletan ball dresses, clipped from an old Book of Beauty. Mrs. Bunting was very fond of these pictures; she thought they gave the drawing-room a note of elegance and refinement.
  2. (intransitive) To float, as if suspended.
  3. (intransitive) To veer in one direction.
    • 1979, New South Wales law reports (page 16)
      The jockey claimed that the horse hung towards the outside
  4. (intransitive, of a ball in cricket, tennis, etc.) To rebound unexpectedly or unusually slowly, due to backward spin on the ball or imperfections of the ground.
  5. (transitive) To hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or position instead of erect.
  6. (transitive) To cause (something) to be suspended, as from a hook, hanger, hinges, or the like.
    It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come! It were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he cast into the sea, than that he should offend one of these little ones.
  7. (transitive, law) To execute (someone) by suspension from the neck.
  8. (intransitive, law) To be executed by suspension by one’s neck from a gallows, a tree, or other raised bar, attached by a rope tied into a noose.
  9. (transitive, informal) (used in maledictions) To damn.
  10. (intransitive, informal) To loiter; to hang around; to spend time idly.
    • 2006, Scuba Diving (issues 1-6, page 49)
      He banned spearfishing wherever he could, started the first eco-moorings in the Caribbean, stopped others from coral- and shell-collecting, and had so much fun 24/7 that some unusually powerful people began to hang with him.
  11. (transitive) To exhibit (an object) by hanging.
  12. (transitive) To apply (wallpaper or drywall to a wall).
  13. (transitive) To decorate (something) with hanging objects.
  14. (intransitive, figuratively) To remain persistently in one’s thoughts.
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine, Ch.X:
      Exploring, I found another short gallery running transversely to the first. This appeared to be devoted to minerals, and the sight of a block of sulphur set my mind running on gunpowder. But I could find no saltpeter; indeed no nitrates of any kind. Doubtless they had deliquesced ages ago. Yet the sulphur hung in my mind and set up a train of thinking.
  15. (transitive) To prevent from reaching a decision, especially by refusing to join in a verdict that must be unanimous.
    One obstinate juror can hang a jury.
  16. (intransitive, computing) To stop responding to manual input devices such as keyboard and mouse.
  17. (transitive, computing) To cause (a program or computer) to stop responding.
  18. (transitive, chess) To cause (a piece) to become vulnerable to capture.
  19. (intransitive, chess) To be vulnerable to capture.
  20. (transitive, baseball, slang) Of a pitcher, to throw a hittable off-speed pitch.
    • 2010, Peter Golenbock, Dynasty: The New York Yankees, 1949-1964, →ISBN, page 409
      McDougald then singled, and with a 3-2 count on Ellie Howard who was playing first base, Spahn hung a curve ball and Howard hit it over the wire fence in left field for a 4-4 tie.
  21. (transitive, figuratively) To attach or cause to stick (a charge or accusation, etc.).
    • 1848, The American Pulpit (volume 3, page 120)
      There were no whisperings, even from his opponents, that he was no better than he ought to be. Because, there was nothing wrong on which to hang a charge. As an eloquent orator, he carried with him the firm support of a good name.
Usage notes
  • Formerly, at least until the 16th century, the past tense of the transitive use of hang was hanged (see quote from King James Bible, above). This form is retained for the legal senses “to be executed by suspension from the neck” and “to execute by suspension from the neck”, with hung used for all other meanings. hung is sometimes also used in the legal senses, but is proscribed in legal or other formal writing (for those senses). Rarely, hanged is used for non-legal senses as well, which is also proscribed. See also the etymology.
Synonyms
  • (be or remain suspended): be suspended, dangle
  • (float as if suspended): float, hover
  • (execute (someone) by suspension from the neck): lynch, string up; see also Thesaurus:kill by hanging
  • (be executed): go to the gallows, swing (informal), take a ride to Tyburn (archaic); see also Thesaurus:die by hanging
  • (loiter): hang about, hang around, loiter
  • (computing: stop responding): freeze, lock up
  • (cause (something) to be suspended): suspend
  • (hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or position instead of erect): drop, lower
  • (to place on a hook): hook, hook up
  • (to put a telephone handset back on a hook): hang up
  • (exhibit): exhibit, show
  • (apply (wallpaper to a wall)): put up
  • (decorate (something) with hanging objects): bedeck, deck, decorate
  • (computing: cause (a program or computer) to stop responding): freeze, lock up
  • (in chess: cause to become vulnerable to capture):
  • (in chess: be vulnerable to capture):
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

hang (plural hangs)

  1. The way in which something hangs.
    This skirt has a nice hang.
  2. (colloquial, figuratively) A grip, understanding.
    He got the hang of it after only two demonstrations.
    • 1911, Alexander MacDonald, The Invisible Island: A Story of the Far North of Queensland (page 105)
      “I don’t see the hang of so much talky-talky,” broke in Uncle Sam. “We’ve heard all that can be said about things, []
  3. (computing) An instance of ceasing to respond to input.
    We sometimes get system hangs.
  4. A sharp or steep declivity or slope.
  5. A mass of hanging material.
    • 2014, Matthew Jobin, The Nethergrim (volume 1)
      They advanced in a crouch, dropping to their knees every few yards to pass under a hang of rock.
  6. (colloquial) The smallest amount of concern or consideration; a damn.
    I don’t give a hang.
    They don’t seem to care a hang about the consequences.
Derived terms
  • get the hang of

Etymology 2

From hang sangwich, Irish colloquial pronunciation of ham sandwich.

Noun

hang (uncountable)

  1. (Ireland, informal, derogatory) Cheap processed ham (cured pork), often made specially for sandwiches.

Etymology 3

Noun

hang

  1. Alternative spelling of Hang (musical instrument)

Anagrams

  • Ghan

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦaŋ/

Etymology 1

From Dutch hangen, a merger of Middle Dutch hangen and {[m|dum|haen}}.

Verb

hang (present hang, present participle hangende, past participle gehang)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) to hang

Etymology 2

From Dutch hang.

Noun

hang (plural hange)

  1. slope
Synonyms
  • helling

Bahnar

Etymology

From Proto-Central Bahnaric *haːŋ, from Chamic. Compare Eastern Cham ꨨꩃ (hang).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haːŋ/

Noun

hang 

  1. bank, shore

Cebuano

Alternative forms

  • halang

Adjective

hang

  1. hot; pungent; spicy

Danish

Pronunciation

IPA(key): [ˈhɑŋˀ]

  • Rhymes: -ɑŋˀ

Etymology 1

From German Hang, a noun derived from hangen, from Proto-Germanic *hanhaną.

Noun

hang c (singular definite hangen, not used in plural form)

  1. inclination or disposition towards something

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

hang

  1. past tense of hænge

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑŋ
  • IPA(key): /ɦɑŋ/

Noun

hang c (plural hangen, diminutive hangetje n)

  1. A support for hanging objects, such as a nail for a picture frame
  2. A place to dry or smoke produce
  3. A tendency, knack

Related terms

  • hangijzer n

Verb

hang

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hangen
  2. imperative of hangen

Estonian

Etymology

Related to Finnish hanko.

Noun

hang (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. fork

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading

  • hang in Eesti keele seletav sõnaraamat

Hungarian

Etymology

From an unattested stem with the suffix -g.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɒŋɡ]
  • Rhymes: -ɒŋɡ

Noun

hang (plural hangok)

  1. voice
  2. sound

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • hang in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Irish

Noun

hang f

  1. h-prothesized form of ang

Italian

Noun

hang m (invariable)

  1. (music) Hang

Malay

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /häŋ/

Pronoun

hang (Jawi spelling هڠ‎)

  1. (dialectal) (object pronoun) The people spoken, or written to, as an object.
  2. (dialectal) (subject pronoun) The people spoken to or written to, as a subject.

Synonyms

  • awak / اوق
  • kamu / کامو
  • kau / کاو
  • anda / اندا
  • engkau / اڠکاو

Further reading

  • “hang” in Pusat Rujukan Persuratan Melayu | Malay Literary Reference Centre, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, 2017.

Mandarin

Romanization

hang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of hāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of háng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of hǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of hàng.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

hang

  1. (intransitive) simple past of henge

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

hang

  1. past of henga

Ternate

Adverb

hang

  1. not yet

References

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001). A Descriptive Study of the Language of Ternate, the Northern Moluccas, Indonesia. University of Pittsburgh.

Vietnamese

Etymology

From Proto-Vietic *haːŋ (cave). Possibly related to the word reconstructed as Proto-Mon-Khmer *ʔaaŋ (to open) by Shorto (2006).

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [haːŋ˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [haːŋ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [haːŋ˧˧]

Noun

(classifier cái) hang • (????, ????, ????, ????, ????)

  1. cave
    Synonym: động
  2. den

Derived terms



English

Etymology

Use as “special skill” from 1580. Possibly from 14th century Middle English krak (a sharp blow), knakke, knakken, from Middle Low German, by onomatopoeia. Latter cognate to German knacken (to crack). See also crack.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /næk/
  • Audio (UK)
  • Rhymes: -æk

Noun

knack (plural knacks)

  1. A readiness in performance; aptness at doing something. [from 1580]
    Synonyms: skill, facility, dexterity
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 254a.
      The sophist runs for cover to the darkness of what is not and attaches himself to it by some knack of his;
  2. A petty contrivance; a toy.
    Synonyms: plaything, knickknack, toy
  3. Something performed, or to be done, requiring aptness and dexterity. [from mid 14th c.]
    Synonyms: trick, device

Derived terms

  • knackless

Translations

Verb

knack (third-person singular simple present knacks, present participle knacking, simple past and past participle knacked)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, dialect) To crack; to make a sharp, abrupt noise; to chink.
  2. To speak affectedly.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Translations

References


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