haphazard vs slapdash what difference

what is difference between haphazard and slapdash

English

Etymology

From archaic hap (chance, luck) +‎ hazard.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌhæpˈhæz.əd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌhæpˈhæz.ɚd/

Adjective

haphazard (comparative more haphazard, superlative most haphazard)

  1. Random; chaotic; incomplete; not thorough, constant, or consistent.
    Synonyms: random, chaotic
    Antonym: systematic
    • 1886, N. H. Egleston, Arbor-Day, Popular Science Monthly, p. 689:
      The haphazard efforts of a few, working here and there without concert, easily spent themselves in attaining results far short of what were needed.
    • 1909, Fielding H. Garrison, Josiah Willard Gibbs and his relation to modern science, Popular Science Monthly, p. 191:
      we assume a gas to be an assemblage of elastic spheres or molecules, flying in straight lines in all directions, with swift haphazard collisions and repulsions, like so many billiard balls.
    • 1912, Robert DeC. Ward, The Value of Non-Instrumental Weather Observations, Popular Science Monthly, p. 129:
      There is a very considerable series of observations — non-instrumental, unsystematic, irregular, “haphazard” if you will — which any one with ordinary intelligence and with a real interest in weather conditions may undertake.

Derived terms

  • haphazardly
  • haphazardness

Translations

Noun

haphazard (plural haphazards)

  1. Simple chance, a random accident, luck.

References

  • haphazard at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • haphazard in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

References

  • haphazard at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • haphazard in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Etymology

slap +‎ dash. First attested in the late 17th century, meaning “careless”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈslæpdæʃ/
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Adjective

slapdash (comparative more slapdash, superlative most slapdash)

  1. Produced or carried out hastily; haphazard; careless.
    • 1989, H. T. Willetts (translator), Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (author), August 1914, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, →ISBN, page 114:
      They had seen Poland, and that was the sort of slovenly, slapdash place they were used to, but once across the German frontier they found everything—crops, roads, buildings—uncannily different.
    • 2014, A teacher, “Choosing a primary school: a teacher’s guide for parents”, The Guardian, 23 September 2014:
      When you’re in the front entrance, get a feel for what’s going on. Tours are never timed to coincide with breaks but if there are any children milling about, see what they’re up to. If they’re on a dutiful errand, for example delivering registers, the school probably encourages a responsible attitude. If they’re play-fighting in the corridor without consequence, it tells a less impressive story and could mean a slapdash approach to discipline.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:careless

Translations

Adverb

slapdash (comparative more slapdash, superlative most slapdash)

  1. In a hasty or careless manner.
  2. Directly, right there; slap-bang.
    Van Eyck signed his portrait of the Arnolfinis slapdash in the center of the painting.
  3. With a slap; all at once; slap.

Synonyms

  • (in a hasty manner): carelessly, haphazardly, hastily
  • (directly): directly

Translations

Verb

slapdash (third-person singular simple present slapdashes, present participle slapdashing, simple past and past participle slapdashed)

  1. (colloquial) To apply, or apply something to, in a hasty, careless, or rough manner; to roughcast.
    to slapdash mortar or paint on a wall
    to slapdash a wall

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