harass vs hassle what difference

what is difference between harass and hassle

English

Etymology

From Old French harasser (to tire out, to vex), of obscure origin, perhaps from Old French harer (to stir up, provoke, set a dog on) and/or Old French harier (to harry); see harry; compare Old French harace (a basket made of cords), harace, harasse (a very heavy and large shield).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: hərăsʹ, hăʹrəs, IPA(key): /həˈɹæs/, /ˈhæɹəs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hăʹrəs, hərăsʹ, IPA(key): /ˈhæɹəs/, /həˈɹæs/
  • Rhymes: -æs
  • Rhymes: -ærəs

Verb

harass (third-person singular simple present harasses, present participle harassing, simple past and past participle harassed)

  1. To fatigue or to tire with repeated and exhausting efforts.
  2. To annoy endlessly or systematically.
    Synonyms: beset, chevy, hassle, harry, molest, plague, provoke
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty Chapter 23[1]
      In my old home, I always knew that John and my master were my friends; but here, although in many ways I was well treated, I had no friend. York might have known, and very likely did know, how that rein harassed me; but I suppose he took it as a matter of course that could not be helped; at any rate nothing was done to relieve me.
  3. To put excessive burdens upon; to subject to anxieties.

Derived terms

  • harasser
  • harassful
  • harassment

Translations

Noun

harass

  1. (obsolete) devastation; waste
  2. (obsolete) worry; harassment
    • The daily harass, and the fight delay’d

Further reading

  • harass in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • harass in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • hassar


English

Etymology

Unknown. Probably from US Southern dialectal hassle (to pant, breathe noisily), possibly from haste +‎ -le (frequentative suffix).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhæsl/
  • Rhymes: -æsəl

Noun

hassle (plural hassles)

  1. Trouble, bother, unwanted annoyances or problems.
    I went through a lot of hassle to be the first to get a ticket.
  2. A fight or argument.
  3. An action which is not worth the difficulty involved.

Translations

Verb

hassle (third-person singular simple present hassles, present participle hassling, simple past and past participle hassled)

  1. To trouble, to bother, to annoy.
  2. To pick a fight or start an argument.

Translations

References

  • hassle at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Hassel, Lashes, halses, lashes, selahs, shales, sheals

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