harbor vs haven what difference

what is difference between harbor and haven

English

Alternative forms

  • harbour (Commonwealth)
  • harborough, herborough (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhɑɹbɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhɑːbə/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)bə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English herberwe, herber, from Old English herebeorg (shelter, lodgings, quarters), from Proto-West Germanic *harjabergu (army shelter, refuge) (compare West Frisian herberch (inn), Dutch herberg (inn), German Herberge), from *harjaz (army) + *bergō (protection), equivalent to Old English here (army, host) + beorg (defense, protection, refuge). Cognate with Old Norse herbergi (a harbour; a room) (whence Icelandic herbergi), Dutch herberg, German Herberge (inn, hostel, shelter), Swedish härbärge. Compare also French auberge (hostel). More at here, harry, borrow and bury. Doublet of harbinger

Noun

harbor (countable and uncountable, plural harbors) (American spelling)

  1. (countable) Any place of shelter.
  2. (countable, nautical) A sheltered expanse of water, adjacent to land, in which ships may anchor or dock, especially for loading and unloading.
    A harbor, even if it is a little harbor, is a good thing, since adventurers come into it as well as go out, and the life in it grows strong, because it takes something from the world, and has something to give in return – Sarah Orne Jewett
  3. (countable, glassworking) A mixing box for materials.
  4. (obsolete, countable) A house of the zodiac, or the mansion of a heavenly body.
    • To ech of hem his tyme and his seson, / As thyn herberwe chaungeth lowe or heighe
  5. (obsolete, uncountable) Shelter, refuge.
Alternative forms
  • harborough (obsolete)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Cebuano: harbor
  • Marshallese: aba
  • Welsh: harbwr
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English herberwen, herbere, from Old English herebeorgian (to take up one’s quarters, lodge), from the noun (see above).

Verb

harbor (third-person singular simple present harbors, present participle harboring, simple past and past participle harbored) (American spelling)

  1. (transitive) To provide a harbor or safe place for.
  2. (intransitive) To take refuge or shelter in a protected expanse of water.
  3. (transitive) To drive (a hunted stag) to covert.
    • 1819, John Mayer, The Sportsman’s Directory, or Park and Gamekeeper’s Companion
      This is the time that the horseman are flung out, not having the cry to lead them to the death. When quadruped animals of the venery or hunting kind are at rest, the stag is said to be harboured, the buck lodged, the fox kennelled, the badger earthed, the otter vented or watched, the hare formed, and the rabbit set.
  4. (transitive) To hold or persistently entertain in one’s thoughts or mind.
Derived terms
  • harborer
Translations

See also

  • haven
  • dock

References

  • harbor in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • “harbor” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “harbor”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • Random House Webster’s Unabridged Electronic Dictionary, 1987-1996.

Cebuano

Etymology

From English harbor, from Middle English herberwen, herberȝen, from Middle English herebeorgian (to take up one’s quarters, lodge),

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: har‧bor

Verb

harbor

  1. (slang) to appropriate another person’s property

Noun

harbor

  1. (slang) appropriation; an act or instance of appropriating

Derived terms

  • harbor

Descendants

  • Cebuano: harbat


English

Etymology

From Middle English haven, havene, from Old English hæfen (haven; harbour; port), from Proto-West Germanic *habanu, from Proto-Germanic *habnō, *habanō (compare Dutch haven, German Hafen, Norwegian/Danish havn, Swedish hamn), from Proto-Germanic *habą (sea) (compare Old English hæf, Middle Low German haf, Old Norse haf (sea), German Haff (bay or lagoon behind a spit), perhaps, in the sense of “heaving sea”, etymologically identical with Old Norse haf (heaving, lifting, uplift, elevation), derived from Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to lift, heave)), or from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂pnós (compare Old Irish cúan (harbor, recess, haven)). Doublet of abra.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈheɪvən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪvən

Noun

haven (plural havens)

  1. A harbour or anchorage protected from the sea.
  2. (by extension) A place of safety; a refuge or sanctuary.
  3. (by extension) A peaceful place.

Synonyms

  • refuge
  • sanctuary
  • zoar

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

haven (third-person singular simple present havens, present participle havening, simple past and past participle havened)

  1. To put into, or provide with a haven.

Translations

Anagrams

  • heav’n, nevah

Danish

Noun

haven c

  1. definite singular of have

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦaːvə(n)/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ven
  • Rhymes: -aːvən

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch havene, from Old Dutch *havana, from Proto-West Germanic *habanu, from Proto-Germanic *habnō, *habanō.

Noun

haven f (plural havens, diminutive haventje n)

  1. harbour
  2. port
Derived terms

– port types

Descendants
  • Afrikaans: hawe
  • Papiamentu: haf, haaf

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

haven

  1. Plural form of have.

Finnish

Alternative forms

  • hapene (dialectal)

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *haben.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑʋen/, [ˈhɑʋe̞n]
  • Rhymes: -ɑʋen
  • Syllabification: ha‧ven

Noun

haven

  1. (dialectal) (single) hair
    Synonyms: hapsi, hius

Declension

Anagrams

  • ahven

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • have, haav, haf, hafe, haben, habben, heven, hawe
  • (contracted) han, haan, ha

Etymology

From Old English habban, hafian, from Proto-West Germanic *habbjan, from Proto-Germanic *habjaną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhaːvən/, /ˈhavən/, /ˈhabən/
  • (contracted) IPA(key): /haːn/

Verb

haven

  1. to own (to have ownership of):
    1. to possess (an abstraction; a quality)
    2. to include (as a part, ingredient, or feature).
    3. to hold; to have at disposal
  2. to get, acquire, or obtain:
    1. to take (in); to be given
    2. to have (a child); to give birth
  3. to do; to perform (an action):
    1. (with preposition) to take (away)
    2. to have (done); to cause to (do, be)
    3. to be obliged to do; to be scheduled to do.
  4. (auxillary) Denotes completion; forms the perfect tense.
  5. to keep; to maintain (in a condition)
  6. to have (in a certain relationship)
  7. to consider; to look upon
  8. to experience; to undergo

Usage notes

  • As in Modern English, haven may be used elliptically in auxiliary constructions if the main verb is implicit.
  • The perfect progressive construction (modern have been + present) is known in Middle English, though rare and late.
  • Some intransitive verbs may form the perfect with ben rather than haven.

Conjugation

Descendants

  • English: have (-‘ve, -a)
  • Scots: hae, ha, hiv, have, hawe (-a)

References

  • “hā̆ven, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Swedish

Noun

haven

  1. definite plural of hav

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian *hafen, *haven, from Proto-West Germanic *habanu, from Proto-Germanic *habnō.

Noun

haven c (plural havens, diminutive haventsje)

  1. harbour
  2. haven, refuge

Derived terms

  • havenhaad

Further reading

  • “haven (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial