harbor vs shield what difference

what is difference between harbor and shield

English

Alternative forms

  • harbour (Commonwealth)
  • harborough, herborough (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhɑɹbɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhɑːbə/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)bə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English herberwe, herber, from Old English herebeorg (shelter, lodgings, quarters), from Proto-West Germanic *harjabergu (army shelter, refuge) (compare West Frisian herberch (inn), Dutch herberg (inn), German Herberge), from *harjaz (army) + *bergō (protection), equivalent to Old English here (army, host) + beorg (defense, protection, refuge). Cognate with Old Norse herbergi (a harbour; a room) (whence Icelandic herbergi), Dutch herberg, German Herberge (inn, hostel, shelter), Swedish härbärge. Compare also French auberge (hostel). More at here, harry, borrow and bury. Doublet of harbinger

Noun

harbor (countable and uncountable, plural harbors) (American spelling)

  1. (countable) Any place of shelter.
  2. (countable, nautical) A sheltered expanse of water, adjacent to land, in which ships may anchor or dock, especially for loading and unloading.
    A harbor, even if it is a little harbor, is a good thing, since adventurers come into it as well as go out, and the life in it grows strong, because it takes something from the world, and has something to give in return – Sarah Orne Jewett
  3. (countable, glassworking) A mixing box for materials.
  4. (obsolete, countable) A house of the zodiac, or the mansion of a heavenly body.
    • To ech of hem his tyme and his seson, / As thyn herberwe chaungeth lowe or heighe
  5. (obsolete, uncountable) Shelter, refuge.
Alternative forms
  • harborough (obsolete)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Cebuano: harbor
  • Marshallese: aba
  • Welsh: harbwr
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English herberwen, herbere, from Old English herebeorgian (to take up one’s quarters, lodge), from the noun (see above).

Verb

harbor (third-person singular simple present harbors, present participle harboring, simple past and past participle harbored) (American spelling)

  1. (transitive) To provide a harbor or safe place for.
  2. (intransitive) To take refuge or shelter in a protected expanse of water.
  3. (transitive) To drive (a hunted stag) to covert.
    • 1819, John Mayer, The Sportsman’s Directory, or Park and Gamekeeper’s Companion
      This is the time that the horseman are flung out, not having the cry to lead them to the death. When quadruped animals of the venery or hunting kind are at rest, the stag is said to be harboured, the buck lodged, the fox kennelled, the badger earthed, the otter vented or watched, the hare formed, and the rabbit set.
  4. (transitive) To hold or persistently entertain in one’s thoughts or mind.
Derived terms
  • harborer
Translations

See also

  • haven
  • dock

References

  • harbor in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • “harbor” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “harbor”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • Random House Webster’s Unabridged Electronic Dictionary, 1987-1996.

Cebuano

Etymology

From English harbor, from Middle English herberwen, herberȝen, from Middle English herebeorgian (to take up one’s quarters, lodge),

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: har‧bor

Verb

harbor

  1. (slang) to appropriate another person’s property

Noun

harbor

  1. (slang) appropriation; an act or instance of appropriating

Derived terms

  • harbor

Descendants

  • Cebuano: harbat


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃiːld/
  • Rhymes: -iːld

Etymology 1

From Middle English scheld, shelde, from Old English scield (shield), from Proto-West Germanic *skeldu, from Proto-Germanic *skelduz (shield), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kelH- (cut, split). Cognate with West Frisian skyld, Dutch schild (shield), German Schild (shield), Danish skjold (shield), Icelandic skjöldur (shield) and Faroese skjøldur (shield)

Compare Latin scūtum (shield), Irish sciath (shield), Latgalian škīda (shield), Lithuanian skydas (shield), Russian щит (ščit, shield), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewH- (to cover, protect), *skey- (to cut, split).

Noun

shield (plural shields)

  1. Anything that protects or defends; defense; shelter; protection.
    1. A broad piece of defensive armor, held in hand, formerly in general use in war, for the protection of the body.
    2. (figuratively) One who protects or defends.
    3. (lichenology) In lichens, a hardened cup or disk surrounded by a rim and containing the fructification, or asci.
    4. (mining, tunnelling) A framework used to protect workmen in making an adit under ground, and capable of being pushed along as excavation progresses.
    5. (science fiction) A field of energy that protects or defends.
  2. A shape like that of a shield; usually, an inverted triangle with sides that curve inward to form a pointed bottom, commonly used for police identifications and company logos.
    1. (heraldry) The escutcheon or field on which are placed the bearings in coats of arms.
    2. (Scotland, euphemistic, obsolete) A toilet seat.
    3. A spot resembling, or having the form of a shield.
    4. (obsolete) A coin, the old French crown, or écu, having on one side the figure of a shield.
    5. (transport) A sign or symbol, usually containing numbers and sometimes letters, identifying a highway route.
    6. (colloquial, law enforcement) A police badge.
  3. (geology) A large expanse of exposed stable Precambrian rock.
    1. (geology) A wide and relatively low-profiled volcano, usually composed entirely of lava flows.
  4. (figuratively, Scotland, euphemistic, obsolete) A place with a toilet seat: an outhouse; a lavatory.
  5. (automotive, British) Parts at the front and back of a vehicle which are meant to absorb the impact of a collision
Synonyms
  • (place with a toilet seat): See Thesaurus:bathroom
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • bitch shield
  • rape shield
  • shield medick (Medicago scutellata)
  • shield wall
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English shelden, from Old English scildan.

Verb

shield (third-person singular simple present shields, present participle shielding, simple past and past participle shielded)

  1. To protect, to defend.
  2. (Britain, intransitive) This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  3. (electricity) to protect from the influence of
Derived terms
  • beshield
Translations

Anagrams

  • Diehls, delish, hidels, hidles, hields, ledish, sheild

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial