hard vs strong what difference

what is difference between hard and strong

English

Etymology

From Middle English hard, from Old English heard, from Proto-West Germanic *hard(ī), from Proto-Germanic *harduz, from Proto-Indo-European *kort-ús, from *kret- (strong, powerful). Cognate with German hart, Swedish hård, Ancient Greek κρατύς (kratús), Sanskrit क्रतु (krátu), Avestan ????????????????????(xratu).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: häd, IPA(key): /hɑːd/
  • (General American) enPR: härd, IPA(key): /hɑɹd/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)d

Adjective

hard (comparative harder, superlative hardest)

  1. (of material or fluid) Having a severe property; presenting difficulty.
    1. Resistant to pressure.
    2. (of drink or drugs) Strong.
    3. (of a normally nonalcoholic drink) Containing alcohol.
      hard cider, hard lemonade, hard seltzer, hard soda
    4. (of water) High in dissolved chemical salts, especially those of calcium.
    5. (physics, of a ferromagnetic material) Having the capability of being a permanent magnet by being a material with high magnetic coercivity (compare soft).
    6. (photography, of light) Made up of parallel rays, producing clearly defined shadows.
  2. (personal or social) Having a severe property; presenting difficulty.
    1. Difficult or requiring a lot of effort to do, understand, experience, or deal with.
      • 1988, An Oracle, Edmund White
        Ray found it hard to imagine having accumulated so many mannerisms before the dawn of sex, of the sexual need to please, of the staginess sex encourages or the tightly capped wells of poisoned sexual desire the disappointed must stand guard over.
    2. Demanding a lot of effort to endure.
    3. Severe, harsh, unfriendly, brutal.
      The senator asked the party chief to put the hard word on his potential rivals.
      • 1730, Henry Fielding, Rape upon Rape, Act 4, Scene 7:
        Leave off fornicating; leave the girls to the boys, and stand to thy bottle; it is a virtue becoming our years; and don’t be too hard on a wild honest young rake.
    4. (dated) Difficult to resist or control; powerful.
    5. (military) Hardened; having unusually strong defences.
      a hard site
  3. Unquestionable, unequivocal.
  4. (of a road intersection) Having a comparatively larger or a ninety-degree angle.
  5. (slang, vulgar, of a male) Sexually aroused; having an erect penis.
  6. (bodybuilding) Having muscles that are tightened as a result of intense, regular exercise.
  7. (phonetics, not comparable)
    1. Plosive.
    2. Unvoiced
    3. Velarized or plain, rather than palatalized
  8. (art) Having a severe property; presenting a barrier to enjoyment.
    1. Rigid in the drawing or distribution of the figures; formal; lacking grace of composition.
    2. Having disagreeable and abrupt contrasts in colour or shading.
  9. (not comparable)
    1. In a physical form, not digital.
    2. Using a manual or physical process, not by means of a software command.
  10. (politics) Far, extreme.
    hard right, hard left
  11. Of silk: not having had the natural gum boiled off.

Synonyms

  • (resistant to pressure): resistant, solid, stony, see also Thesaurus:hard
  • (requiring a lot of effort to do or understand): confusing, difficult, puzzling, tough, tricky
  • (requiring a lot of effort to endure): difficult, intolerable, tough, unbearable
  • (severe): harsh, hostile, severe, strict, tough, unfriendly
  • (unquestionable): incontrovertible, indubitable, unambiguous, unequivocal, unquestionable
  • (of drink): strong
  • See also Thesaurus:difficult

Antonyms

  • (resistant to pressure): soft
  • (requiring a lot of effort to do or understand): easy, simple, straightforward, trite
  • (requiring a lot of effort to endure): bearable, easy
  • (severe): agreeable, amiable, approachable, friendly, nice, pleasant
  • (unquestionable): controvertible, doubtful, ambiguous, equivocal, questionable
  • (of drink):
    • (low in alcohol): low-alcohol
    • (non-alcoholic): alcohol-free, soft, non-alcoholic
  • (of roads): soft
  • (sexually aroused): soft, flaccid
  • (phonetics, all senses): soft

Derived terms

  • Pages starting with “hard”.
  • Related terms

    • hardpeer
    • hardy

    Descendants

    • Finnish: haarti

    Translations

    Adverb

    hard (comparative harder, superlative hardest)

    1. (manner) With much force or effort.
      He hit the puck hard up the ice.
      They worked hard all week.
      At the intersection, bear hard left.
      The recession hit them especially hard.
      Think hard about your choices.
      • prayed so hard for mercy from the prince
      • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act III, Scene i[3]:
        [] My father / Is hard at study. Pray now, rest yourself;
    2. (manner) With difficulty.
      His degree was hard earned.
    3. (obsolete) So as to raise difficulties.
    4. (manner) Compactly.
      The lake had finally frozen hard.
    5. (now archaic) Near, close.
      • [] whose house joined hard to the synagogue.
      • 1999, George RR Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam 2011, page 418:
        It was another long day’s march before they glimpsed the towers of Harrenhal in the distance, hard beside the blue waters of the lake.

    Derived terms

    Translations

    Noun

    hard (countable and uncountable, plural hards)

    1. (countable, nautical) A firm or paved beach or slope convenient for hauling vessels out of the water.
      • 1952, Edward John Barrington Douglas-Scott-Montagu Baron Montagu, Beaulieu, the Abbey, Palace House, and Buckler’s Hard (page 36)
        The Monastery’s ironworks at Sowley were renowned for centuries but declined with the passing of the ‘wooden walls’ at Buckler’s Hard — a great number of these ships having been built with timber from the Beaulieu Woods []
    2. (countable, motorsports) A tyre whose compound is softer than superhards, and harder than mediums.
    3. (uncountable, drugs, slang) Crack cocaine.
    4. (uncountable, slang) Hard labor.
      The prisoners were sentenced to three years’ hard.

    Anagrams

    • Dhar

    Dutch

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɦɑrt/
    • Hyphenation: hard
    • Rhymes: -ɑrt
    • Homophone: hart

    Etymology 1

    From Middle Dutch hart, from Old Dutch hart, from Proto-West Germanic *hard(ī), from Proto-Germanic *harduz.

    Adjective

    hard (comparative harder, superlative hardst)

    1. hard, strong
      Antonym: zacht
    2. (economics, of a currency) strong, not easily devalued
    3. unquestionable, uncontestable
    4. heartless, unsympathetic (of a person)
      Antonym: zacht
    5. hard, difficult
    6. harsh, heavy
    7. hard, rich in calcium (of water)
      Antonym: zacht
    8. loud (of sound)
      Synonym: luid
      Antonym: zacht
    9. fast
      Antonyms: langzaam, traag
      Synonym: snel
    Inflection
    Derived terms
    • keihard
    • harden
    • hardheid
    • hardlopen
    • hardroeien
    • hardrijden
    Descendants
    • Jersey Dutch: hārd
    • Negerhollands: hart
    • Skepi Creole Dutch: hardt

    Etymology 2

    (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

    Adverb

    hard

    1. (speed) fast, swiftly
    2. very
    3. loudly

    Etymology 3

    See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

    Verb

    hard

    1. first-person singular present indicative of harden
    2. imperative of harden

    French

    Etymology

    Borrowed from English hard.

    Pronunciation

    • (aspirated h) IPA(key): /aʁd/

    Adjective

    hard (plural hards)

    1. (of pornography) hardcore

    Noun

    hard m (plural hards)

    1. hardcore pornography
    2. hard rock
      • 2004, Thomas Mansier, Identité du rock et presse spécialisée. Évolution d’une culture et de son discours critique dans les magazines français des années 90, page 98.
      • 2014, Christian Eudeline, “Uriah Heep. Look At Yourself”, in Du hard rock au métal. Les 100 albums cultes, Gründ (publ.).

    Irish

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [haːɾˠd̪ˠ]

    Adjective

    hard

    1. h-prothesized form of ard

    Norwegian Bokmål

    Etymology

    From Old Norse harðr, from Proto-Germanic *harduz.

    Adjective

    hard (neuter singular hardt, definite singular and plural harde, comparative hardere, indefinite superlative hardest, definite superlative hardeste)

    1. hard (not soft)
    2. hard, stern, severe
    3. hardy

    Derived terms

    • beinhard
    • hardhet
    • hardkokt
    • hardtslående

    Related terms

    • forherde
    • herde

    References

    • “hard” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Etymology

    From Old Norse harðr, from Proto-Germanic *harduz.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /hɑːr/, /hɑːɽ/ (example of pronunciation)
    • Homophone: har

    Adjective

    hard (masculine and feminine hard, neuter hardt, definite singular and plural harde, comparative hardare, indefinite superlative hardast, definite superlative hardaste)

    1. hard
    2. hard, stern, severe
    3. hardy

    Derived terms

    • beinhard
    • hardkokt

    References

    • “hard” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

    Old Saxon

    Etymology

    From Proto-West Germanic *hard(ī).

    Adjective

    hard (comparative hardiro, superlative hardist)

    1. hard

    Declension




    Derived terms

    • hardī

    Descendants

    • Low German: hard, hart (inflected hart-)

    Spanish

    Etymology

    From English hard.

    Adjective

    hard (invariable)

    1. hard, heavy, hardcore


    English

    Alternative forms

    • strang (dialectal)

    Etymology

    From Middle English strong, strang, from Old English strong, strang (strong, powerful, mighty, able; firm, constant, resolute, strenuous, hardy; hard, severe, fierce, stern, strict; bold, brave; valid, assured; effective, producing a great effect, potent; earnest; arduous, violent), from Proto-Germanic *strangaz (tight, strict, straight, strong), from Proto-Indo-European *strengʰ- (taut, stiff, tight). Cognate with Scots strang (strong), Saterland Frisian strang, West Frisian string (austere, strict, harsh, severe, stern, stark, tough), Dutch streng (strict, severe, tight), German streng (strict, severe, austere), Swedish sträng, strang (severe, strict, harsh), Norwegian strang (strong, harsh, bitter), Norwegian streng (strong, hard), Icelandic strangur (strict), Latin stringō (tighten).

    Pronunciation

    • (UK) enPR: strŏng, IPA(key): /stɹɒŋ/, [st̠͡ɹ̠ɒŋ], [ʃt̠͡ɹ̠ɒŋ]
    • (US) enPR: strông, IPA(key): /stɹɔŋ/, [st̠͡ɹ̠ɔŋ], [ʃt̠͡ɹ̠ɔŋ]
    • (Canada, cotcaught merger) enPR: strŏng, IPA(key): /stɹɑŋ/, [st̠͡ɹ̠ɑŋ], [ʃt̠͡ɹ̠ɑŋ]
    • Rhymes: -ɒŋ

    Adjective

    strong (comparative stronger, superlative strongest)

    1. Capable of producing great physical force.
    2. Capable of withstanding great physical force.
    3. (of water, wind, etc.) Having a lot of power.
    4. Determined; unyielding.
      • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, The Mirror and the Lamp, chapter 10:
        It was a joy to snatch some brief respite, and find himself in the rectory drawing–room. Listening here was as pleasant as talking; just to watch was pleasant. The young priests who lived here wore cassocks and birettas; their faces were fine and mild, yet really strong, like the rector’s face; and in their intercourse with him and his wife they seemed to be brothers.
    5. Highly stimulating to the senses.
    6. Having an offensive or intense odor or flavor.
    7. Having a high concentration of an essential or active ingredient.
    8. (specifically) Having a high alcoholic content.
      She gets up, and pours herself a strong one. – Eagles, Lying Eyes
    9. (grammar) Inflecting in a different manner than the one called weak, such as Germanic verbs which change vowels.
    10. (chemistry) That completely ionizes into anions and cations in a solution.
    11. (military) Not easily subdued or taken.
    12. Having wealth or resources.
    13. (slang, US) Impressive, good.
    14. Having a specified number of people or units.
    15. (of a disease or symptom) Severe; very bad or intense.
      • 2005, Andrew Gaeddert, Healing Immune Disorders: Natural Defense-Building Solutions, North Atlantic Books, page 221:
        Physicians may diagnosis influenza by a throat culture or blood test, which may be important if you have a particularly strong flu, if your doctor suspects pneumonia or a bacterial infection.
    16. (mathematics, logic) Having a wide range of logical consequences; widely applicable. (Often contrasted with a weak statement which it implies.)
    17. (of an argument) Convincing.

    Synonyms

    • (capable of producing great physical force): forceful, powerful, derf
    • (capable of withstanding great physical force): durable, tough, sturdy
    • (determined, unyielding): ardent, determined, swith, unyielding, zealous
    • (highly stimulating to the senses): extreme, intense
    • (having an offensive or intense odor or flavor): rank
    • (having a high concentration of an essential or active ingredient): concentrated, potent
    • (having a high alcoholic content): hard
    • (grammar: irregular): irregular
    • (military: not easily subdued or taken): impregnable, inviolable, secure, unassailable, unattackable

    Antonyms

    • (capable of producing great physical force): forceless, weak
    • (capable of withstanding great physical force): fragile
    • (having a high concentration of an essential or active ingredient): diluted, impotent, weak
    • (grammar: irregular): regular, weak
    • (chemistry: that completely ionizes): weak
    • (military: not easily subdued or taken): weak

    Hyponyms

    • ultra-strong

    Translations

    See also

    • strength

    Adverb

    strong (not comparable)

    1. In a strong manner.

    Synonyms

    • (in a strong manner): forcefully, powerfully, vigorously, strongly

    Antonyms

    • (in a strong manner): forcelessly, powerlessly, weakly

    Translations

    See also

    • strong as an ox
    • strong personality
    • strong verb

    Anagrams

    • trongs

    Middle English

    Etymology 1

    From Old English strang, form Proto-Germanic *strangaz.

    Alternative forms

    • stronge, stronke, stron, strange, straunge

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /strɔnɡ/

    Adjective

    strong (plural and weak singular stronge, comparative strongere, superlative strongest)

    1. strong
    Antonyms
    • feble
    • weyk
    Descendants
    • English: strong
    • Scots: strang
    • Yola: straung
    References
    • “strong, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

    Etymology 2

    From Old French estrange

    Adjective

    strong

    1. Alternative form of straunge

    Swedish

    Etymology

    Through Swedish slang, based on English strong, since 1922. There is also a form strång with a different sense since 1640.

    Adjective

    strong (comparative strongare, superlative strongast)

    1. mentally and morally strong, courageous

    Declension

    Related terms

    • strongt

    References

    • strong in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
    • strong in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

    Tok Pisin

    Etymology

    English strong

    Adjective

    strong

    1. Capable of producing great physical force; strong.
    2. Capable of withstanding great physical force; strong.
    3. Determined, unyielding.

    See also

    • strongim
    • strongpela

    Noun

    strong

    1. Strength


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