harmonic vs sympathetic what difference

what is difference between harmonic and sympathetic

English

Alternative forms

  • harmonick (obsolete)

Etymology

From Latin harmonicus, from Ancient Greek ἁρμονικός (harmonikós), from ἁρμονία (harmonía, harmony).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɑː(ɹ)ˈmɒnɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnɪk

Adjective

harmonic (comparative more harmonic, superlative most harmonic)

  1. pertaining to harmony
  2. pleasant to hear; harmonious; melodious
  3. (mathematics) used to characterize various mathematical entities or relationships supposed to bear some resemblance to musical consonance
  4. recurring periodically
  5. (phonology) Exhibiting or applying constraints on what vowels (e.g. front/back vowels only) may be found near each other and sometimes in the entire word.
  6. (Australianist linguistics) Of or relating to a generation an even number of generations distant from a particular person.
    • 1966, Kenneth Hale, Kinship Reflections in Syntax: Some Australian languages
      A person is harmonic with respect to members of his own generation and with respect to members of all even-numbered generations counting away from his own (e.g., his grandparents’ generation, his grandchildren’s generation, etc.).

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

harmonic (plural harmonics)

  1. (physics) A component frequency of the signal of a wave that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency.
  2. (music) The place where, on a bowed string instrument, a note in the harmonic series of a particular string can be played without the fundamental present.
  3. (mathematics) One of a class of functions that enter into the development of the potential of a nearly spherical mass due to its attraction.
  4. (CB radio slang) One’s child.
    • 1967, CQ: the Radio Amateur’s Journal (volume 23, issues 7-12, page 140)
      Games for the harmonics, (children), YL’s and XYL’s and the OM’s, plus free soda for all.
    • 1988, Amateur Radio (volume 44, issues 1-6, page 38)
      The harmonics (kids, I mean) sometimes failed to recognize me on the rare occasions when I emerged from the shack []

Translations

Anagrams

  • choirman, chromian, omniarch, rahmonic


English

Alternative forms

  • sympathetick (obsolete)
  • sympathetical

Etymology

Mid 17th century in the sense relating to an affinity or paranormal influence, from sympathy +‎ -etic (pertaining to), on the pattern of pathetic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌsɪm.pəˈθɛt.ɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtɪk

Adjective

sympathetic (comparative more sympathetic, superlative most sympathetic)

  1. Of, related to, feeling, showing, or characterized by sympathy.
    Antonym: unsympathetic
    1. Showing approval of or favor towards an idea or action.
      Synonym: approving
  2. (of a person) Attracting the liking of others.
    1. (construction) Designed in a sensitive or appropriate way.
  3. (relational) Relating to, producing, or denoting an effect which arises through an affinity, interdependence, or mutual association.
    1. (of magic) A supernatural connection or power resulting from two items having the same form or some other correspondence.
    2. (sound) Relating to musical tones produced by sympathetic vibration or to strings so tuned as to sound by sympathetic vibration.
  4. (neuroanatomy, neurology, relational) Relating to or denoting the part of the autonomic nervous system consisting of nerves arising from ganglia near the middle part of the spinal cord, supplying the internal organs, blood vessels, and glands, and balancing the action of the parasympathetic nerves.
    Antonym: parasympathetic

Derived terms

Related terms

  • sympathico-

Translations

References

  • “sympathetic”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “sympathetic”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

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