harness vs rein what difference

what is difference between harness and rein

English

Etymology

From Middle English harneys, harnes, harneis, harnais, herneis, from Anglo-Norman harneis and Old French hernois (equipment used in battle), believed to be from Old Norse *hernest, from Old Norse heer (army) + nest (provisions). More at harry.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhɑː(ɹ).nəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)nəs

Noun

harness (countable and uncountable, plural harnesses)

  1. (countable) A restraint or support, especially one consisting of a loop or network of rope or straps.
  2. (countable) A collection of wires or cables bundled and routed according to their function.
  3. (dated, uncountable) The complete dress, especially in a military sense, of a man or a horse; armour in general.
    • 1606 William Shakespeare, Macbeth, act V, scene V
      Ring the alarum-bell! Blow, wind! come, wrack!
      At least we’ll die with harness on our back.
  4. The part of a loom comprising the heddles, with their means of support and motion, by which the threads of the warp are alternately raised and depressed for the passage of the shuttle.
  5. Equipment for any kind of labour.

Alternative forms

  • harnass (rare, archaic)

Derived terms

  • harnessed antelope
  • harnessed moth
  • test harness

Translations

Verb

harness (third-person singular simple present harnesses, present participle harnessing, simple past and past participle harnessed)

  1. (transitive) To place a harness on something; to tie up or restrain.
  2. (transitive) To capture, control or put to use.
  3. (transitive) To equip with armour.

Translations

See also

  • harness on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Harness in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Shaners, Shearns


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹeɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn
  • Homophones: rain, reign

Etymology 1

From Middle English rein, reyne, borrowed from Anglo-Norman reyne and Old French resne (Modern French rêne), from Vulgar Latin *retina, from Classical Latin retineō (to retain), from re- + teneō.

Displaced native Old English ġewealdleþer (literally control leather).

Noun

rein (plural reins)

  1. A strap or rope attached to a bridle or bit, used to control a horse, animal or young child.
  2. (figuratively) An instrument or means of curbing, restraining, or governing.
Derived terms
  • free rein
  • keep a tight rein on
  • take the reins
Translations

Verb

rein (third-person singular simple present reins, present participle reining, simple past and past participle reined)

  1. (transitive) To direct or stop a horse by using reins.
  2. (transitive) To restrain; to control; to check.
  3. (intransitive) To obey directions given with the reins.
    • 2011, Marie Claire Peck, Rocking Horse Ranch (page 40)
      She worked each horse at a walk, trot, and then a canter. The horses reined well and executed stops quickly.
Derived terms
  • rein in
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Anglo-Norman reines, Middle French reins, and their source, Latin rēnēs.

Noun

rein (plural reins)

  1. (now rare, archaic, chiefly in plural) A kidney.
    • 1611, King James Bible, Lamentations 3:13:
      He hath caused the arrows of his quiver to enter into my reins.
  2. The inward impulses; the affections and passions, formerly supposed to be located in the area of the kidneys.
    • My reins rejoice, when thy lips speak right things.
    • I am he which searcheth the reins and hearts.

Anagrams

  • Erin, N.Ire., Rine, in re, rine

Bavarian

Noun

rein

  1. (Timau) rain

References

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch reine, from Old Dutch reini, from Proto-West Germanic *hrainī, from Proto-Germanic *hrainiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɛi̯n/

Adjective

rein (comparative reiner, superlative reinst)

  1. (formal) clean, spotless
  2. pure, sheer

Inflection

Derived terms

  • onrein

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: rein

Anagrams

  • erin, nier

Finnish

Noun

rein

  1. instructive plural of reki

Anagrams

  • Erin, erin

French

Etymology

From Middle French rein, from Old French rein, from the plural reins, from Latin rēnes < rēn, from Proto-Italic *hrēn, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰren- (an internal part of the body).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁɛ̃/

Noun

rein m (plural reins)

  1. (anatomy) kidney
  2. (in the plural) small of the back, waist

Derived terms

Related terms

  • rénal
  • rognon

Further reading

  • “rein” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • nier, rien

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁaɪn/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ̯n
  • Homophone: Rhein

Etymology 1

From Middle High German reine, from Old High German reini, from Proto-West Germanic *hrainī, from Proto-Germanic *hrainiz, from Proto-Indo-European *króy-n-is, from *krey- (divide, sift). Cognate with Old Saxon hreni, (Low German ren), Dutch rein, Old Norse hreinn (Swedish ren), Ancient Greek κρῑ́νω (krī́nō, separate, decide, judge), Old Irish criathar, English riddle (sieve).

Adjective

rein (comparative reiner, superlative am reinsten)

  1. pure, clear, plain
    • 2010, Der Spiegel, issue 24/2010, page 131:
Declension

Adverb

rein

  1. purely
Related terms
  • reinigen

Etymology 2

Contraction of herein (in here), or hinein (in there).

Adverb

rein

  1. (colloquial) inside, in here
  2. (colloquial) inside, in there
Usage notes

The standard language distinguishes the meanings of hinein (in there: away from the speaker) and herein (in here: towards the speaker). Rein is used for both meanings.

Synonyms
  • herein
  • hinein
Related terms
  • hinaus
  • heraus
  • raus

Further reading

  • “rein” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Friedrich Kluge (1883), “rein”, in John Francis Davis, transl., Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, published 1891

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse rein, reina, from Proto-Germanic *rainō. Cognate with English rean, German Rain.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈreiːn/
  • Rhymes: -eiːn

Noun

rein f (genitive singular reinar, nominative plural reinar)

  1. strip (of land)

Declension

Derived terms

  • aðrein
  • akrein
  • frárein

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish rígan (queen), from Proto-Celtic *rīganī. Cognate to Irish ríon, Scottish Gaelic rìghinn, rìbhinn, Welsh rhiain.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /reːn/

Noun

rein f (genitive singular [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. queen, regina

Synonyms

  • benrein

Derived terms

  • benrein

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French rein.

Noun

rein m (plural reins)

  1. (anatomy) kidney

Descendants

  • French: rein

Norman

Etymology

From Old French rein, reins, from Latin rēn, rēnes.

Noun

rein m (plural reins)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) kidney

Related terms

  • rîngnon

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rejn/, [ɾæɪ̯n]
  • Homophone: regn

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hreinn

Alternative forms

  • ren

Adjective

rein (neuter singular reint, definite singular and plural reine, comparative reinere, indefinite superlative reinest, definite superlative reineste)

  1. clean
  2. pure

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hreinn

Noun

rein m (definite singular reinen, indefinite plural reiner, definite plural reinene)

  1. a reindeer
Synonyms
  • reinsdyr
Derived terms
  • reinkalv

References

  • “rein” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ræɪn/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hreinn

Adjective

rein (neuter singular reint, definite singular and plural reine, comparative reinare, indefinite superlative reinast, definite superlative reinaste)

  1. clean
  2. pure

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hreinn

Noun

rein m (definite singular reinen, indefinite plural reinar, definite plural reinane)

  1. a reindeer, Rangifer tarandus
    • 1855, Ivar Aasen, Ervingen:
      [] renna i Kapp med Reinen, um Raasi er tung og vaat: Dat maa ein Galning vera, som so vil fara aat.

      To race against the reindeer, if the road is soggy and wet: It must be a madman who wants to act like that.
Synonyms
  • reinsdyr
Derived terms
  • reinkalv
  • reinsbukk

References

  • “rein” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Etymology 1

First attested in the plural as reins, from Latin rēnes, plural of the almost unused rēn.

Alternative forms

  • rain

Noun

rein m (oblique plural reinz, nominative singular reinz, nominative plural rein)

  1. (anatomy) kidney
  2. (in the plural, reins) small of the back, lower back
Descendants
  • Middle French: rein
    • French: rein
  • Norman: rein
  • Walloon: rino, rno, rin
  • English: rein

Etymology 2

See rien

Noun

rein f (oblique plural reinz, nominative singular rein, nominative plural reinz)

  1. Alternative form of rien

Plautdietsch

Adjective

rein

  1. clean
  2. pure, immaculate
  3. chaste

Volapük

Noun

rein (nominative plural reins)

  1. rain

Declension

Synonyms

  • lömib

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian [Term?], from Proto-West Germanic *regn, from Proto-Germanic *regną.

Pronunciation

  • (Clay) IPA(key): /rai̯n/
  • (Wood) IPA(key): /rɛi̯n/

Noun

rein c (no plural, diminutive reintsje)

  1. rain

Derived terms

  • reinbôge

Further reading

  • “rein (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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