harness vs tackle what difference

what is difference between harness and tackle

English

Etymology

From Middle English harneys, harnes, harneis, harnais, herneis, from Anglo-Norman harneis and Old French hernois (equipment used in battle), believed to be from Old Norse *hernest, from Old Norse heer (army) + nest (provisions). More at harry.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhɑː(ɹ).nəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)nəs

Noun

harness (countable and uncountable, plural harnesses)

  1. (countable) A restraint or support, especially one consisting of a loop or network of rope or straps.
  2. (countable) A collection of wires or cables bundled and routed according to their function.
  3. (dated, uncountable) The complete dress, especially in a military sense, of a man or a horse; armour in general.
    • 1606 William Shakespeare, Macbeth, act V, scene V
      Ring the alarum-bell! Blow, wind! come, wrack!
      At least we’ll die with harness on our back.
  4. The part of a loom comprising the heddles, with their means of support and motion, by which the threads of the warp are alternately raised and depressed for the passage of the shuttle.
  5. Equipment for any kind of labour.

Alternative forms

  • harnass (rare, archaic)

Derived terms

  • harnessed antelope
  • harnessed moth
  • test harness

Translations

Verb

harness (third-person singular simple present harnesses, present participle harnessing, simple past and past participle harnessed)

  1. (transitive) To place a harness on something; to tie up or restrain.
  2. (transitive) To capture, control or put to use.
  3. (transitive) To equip with armour.

Translations

See also

  • harness on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Harness in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Shaners, Shearns


English

Etymology

From Middle English takel (gear, apparatus), from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German takel (ship’s rigging), perhaps related to Middle Dutch taken (to grasp, seize). Akin to Danish takkel (tackle), Swedish tackel (tackle). More at take.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtækəl/, [ˈtʰækɫ̩]
  • Rhymes: -ækəl

Noun

tackle (countable and uncountable, plural tackles)

  1. A device for grasping an object and an attached means of moving it, as a rope and hook.
  2. A block and tackle.
  3. (nautical, slang, uncountable) Clothing.
  4. (fishing, uncountable) Equipment (rod, reel, line, lure, etc.) used when angling.
  5. (uncountable, informal, by extension) Equipment, gear, gadgetry.
    • 2004 June 24–30, “Jeff Gordon Never Gets Tired Of Seeing Face On Cheap Plastic Crap”, The Onion, available in Embedded in America, →ISBN, page 193,
      … an illuminated license-plate frame bearing his likeness, signature, and yellow number 24. “That there’s a real nice piece of tackle. …”
  6. (sports, countable) A play where a player attempts to take control over the ball from an opponent, as in rugby or football.
  7. (rugby, American football, countable) A play where a defender brings the ball carrier to the ground.
  8. (countable) Any instance in which one person intercepts another and forces them to the ground.
  9. (American football) An offensive line position between a guard and an end: offensive tackle; a person playing that position.
  10. (American football) A defensive position between two defensive ends: defensive tackle; a person playing that position.
  11. (slang) A man’s genitalia.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

tackle (third-person singular simple present tackles, present participle tackling, simple past and past participle tackled)

  1. To force a person to the ground with the weight of one’s own body, usually by jumping on top or slamming one’s weight into him or her.
  2. To face or deal with, attempting to overcome or fight down.
  3. (sports) To attempt to take away a ball.
  4. (rugby, American football) To bring a ball carrier to the ground.
  5. (Singapore, colloquial) To “hit on” or pursue a person that one is interested in.

Translations

References

  • tackle in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • tackle at OneLook Dictionary Search

French

Pronunciation

  • Homophones: tacklent, tackles, tacle, tacles

Verb

tackle

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tackler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of tackler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of tackler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of tackler
  5. second-person singular imperative of tackler

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English tackle.

Noun

tackle m (plural tackles)

  1. (sports) tackle

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