harry vs hassle what difference

what is difference between harry and hassle

English

Etymology

From Middle English herien, harien (compare Walloon hairyî, old French hairier, harier), from Old English herġian, from Proto-Germanic *harjōną (compare Saterland Frisian ferheerje, German verheeren (to harry, devastate), Swedish härja (ravage, harry)), from *harjaz (army) (compare Old English here, West Frisian hear, Dutch heer, German Heer), from Proto-Indo-European *koryos (compare Middle Irish cuire (army), Lithuanian kãrias (army; war), Old Church Slavonic кара (kara, strife), Ancient Greek κοίρανος (koíranos, chief, commander), Old Persian [script needed] (kāra, army)). More at here (army).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /hæɹi/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /hæɹi/, /hɛɹi/
  • Rhymes: -æɹi

Verb

harry (third-person singular simple present harries, present participle harrying, simple past and past participle harried) (transitive)

  1. To plunder, pillage, assault.
  2. To make repeated attacks on an enemy.
  3. To strip, lay waste, ravage.
    • to harry this beautiful region
    • 1896, John Burroughs, Birds and bees and other studies in nature
      A red squirrel had harried the nest of a wood thrush.
  4. To harass, bother or distress with demands, threats, or criticism.

Derived terms

  • harrier

Translations


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From the English name Harry.

Adjective

harry (indeclinable)

  1. (slang, derogatory) cheesy, shabby, kitschy

Derived terms

  • harrytur
  • harryhandel

References

  • “harry” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From the English name Harry.

Adjective

harry (indeclinable)

  1. (slang, derogatory) cheesy, shabby, kitschy

Derived terms

  • harrytur
  • harryhandel

References

  • “harry” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


English

Etymology

Unknown. Probably from US Southern dialectal hassle (to pant, breathe noisily), possibly from haste +‎ -le (frequentative suffix).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhæsl/
  • Rhymes: -æsəl

Noun

hassle (plural hassles)

  1. Trouble, bother, unwanted annoyances or problems.
    I went through a lot of hassle to be the first to get a ticket.
  2. A fight or argument.
  3. An action which is not worth the difficulty involved.

Translations

Verb

hassle (third-person singular simple present hassles, present participle hassling, simple past and past participle hassled)

  1. To trouble, to bother, to annoy.
  2. To pick a fight or start an argument.

Translations

References

  • hassle at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Hassel, Lashes, halses, lashes, selahs, shales, sheals

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