harsh vs swingeing what difference

what is difference between harsh and swingeing

English

Etymology

From Middle English harsk, harisk(e), hask(e), herris. Century derived the term from Old Norse harskr (whence Danish harsk (rancid), dialectal Norwegian hersk, Swedish härsk); the Middle English Dictionary derives it from that and Middle Low German harsch (rough, literally hairy) (whence also German harsch), from haer (hair); the Oxford Dictionary of English derives it from Middle Low German alone.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /hɑɹʃ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /hɑːʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)ʃ

Adjective

harsh (comparative harsher, superlative harshest)

  1. Unpleasantly rough to the touch or other senses.
  2. Severe or cruel.

Antonyms

  • genteel

Translations

Verb

harsh (third-person singular simple present harshes, present participle harshing, simple past and past participle harshed)

  1. (intransitive, slang) To negatively criticize.
  2. (transitive, slang) to put a damper on (a mood).

Synonyms

  • rough

Derived terms

  • harshly
  • harshness

Translations



English

Etymology

swinge +‎ -ing. Swinge is derived from Middle English swenge (to strike), from Old English swengan (to dash, strike; to cause to swing).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈswɪn(d)ʒɪŋ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈswɪndʒɪŋ/
  • Hyphenation: swinge‧ing

Adjective

swingeing (comparative more swingeing, superlative most swingeing)

  1. (chiefly Britain) Huge, immense.
    Synonyms: whopping; see also Thesaurus:gigantic
  2. Heavy, powerful, scathing.

Derived terms

  • swingeingly

Related terms

  • swinge
  • swinger (one who swinges; anything very large, forcible, or astonishing) (obsolete, slang)

Verb

swingeing

  1. (archaic) present participle of swinge.

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