hart vs stag what difference

what is difference between hart and stag

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /hɑːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /hɑɹt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t
  • Homophone: heart

Etymology 1

From Middle English hert, from Old English heorot (stag), from Proto-Germanic *herutaz (compare Dutch hert, German Hirsch, Danish/Norwegian/Swedish hjort), from Pre-Germanic *kerudos, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóru (horn).

Noun

hart (plural harts)

  1. A male deer, especially the male of the red deer after his fifth year.
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion song 13 p. 213[1]:
      She Huntresse-like the Hart pursues;
  2. A red deer or one of related species.
Derived terms
  • Hertford
  • White Hart Lane
Related terms
  • hind (the female)
Translations

Etymology 2

See heart.

Noun

hart (plural harts)

  1. Obsolete spelling of heart
    • , scene i:
      For this reliefe much thanks, tis bitter cold, and I am ſick at hart.

Anagrams

  • Arth, Rath, Thar, rath, tahr, thar

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch hart, from Middle Dutch herte, harte, from Old Dutch herta, from Proto-Germanic *hertô, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr.

Noun

hart (plural harte)

  1. heart

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɑrt/
  • Hyphenation: hart
  • Rhymes: -ɑrt
  • Homophone: hard

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch herte, harte, from Old Dutch herta, from Proto-West Germanic *hertā, from Proto-Germanic *hertô, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr.

Noun

hart n (plural harten, diminutive hartje n)

  1. heart, main muscle pumping blood through the body:
  2. The center point or zone of an object, image etc.
  3. The core or essence of some thing, reasoning etc.
  4. Compassionate or similar feelings
Alternative forms
  • hert
  • herte
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: hart
  • Negerhollands: hert, hart, hat

Etymology 2

Noun

hart n (plural harten, diminutive hartje n)

  1. (Northern) Archaic form of hert (deer).

Faroese

Etymology

See harður (hard, loud)

Adjective

hart (neuter of harður)

  1. hard
  2. loud

French

Etymology

From Middle French hart, from Old French hart, hard, a borrowing from Frankish *heʀdā.

Pronunciation

  • (aspirated h) IPA(key): /aʁ/, /aʁt/

Noun

hart f (plural harts)

  1. (archaic) cord, rope; halter (hangman’s rope)

Further reading

  • “hart” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Etymology

From Middle High German hart, Old High German hart, from Proto-West Germanic *hard(ī), from Proto-Germanic *harduz, from Proto-Indo-European kortús (strong; powerful). Cognate with Low German hard, hart, Dutch hard, English hard, Danish hård.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hart/, [haʁt], [haɐ̯t], [haːt]
  • Homophones: harrt (general), haart (some speakers)

Adjective

hart (comparative härter, superlative am härtesten)

  1. hard
  2. severe, harsh
  3. (figuratively) unmoved, cold, cruel

Declension

Adverb

hart

  1. hard (with force or effort)
  2. sharply, roughly, severely
  3. close (an (+ dative) to)

Further reading

  • “hart” in Duden online
  • “hart” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Icelandic

Adjective

hart

  1. neuter nominative/accusative of harður

Irish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English heart.

Noun

hart m (genitive singular hairt, nominative plural hairt)

  1. (card games) heart
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

hart

  1. h-prothesized form of art

References

  • “hart” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch hart

Adjective

hart

  1. hard (not soft)
  2. solid, sturdy
  3. hard, harsh, cruel

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: hard

Further reading

  • “hart”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “hart (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian herte, from Proto-West Germanic *hertā. Cognates include West Frisian hert.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hart/

Noun

hart n (plural harten)

  1. (Mooring and Föhr-Amrum dialects) heart

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hard(ī).

Adjective

hart (comparative hardiro, superlative hardist)

  1. hard

Inflection


Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: hart
    • Dutch: hard

Further reading

  • “hart (II)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hard(ī), from Proto-Germanic *harduz, whence also Old Saxon hard, Old Dutch hart, Old English heard, Old Norse harðr, Gothic ???????????????????????? (hardus). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kert-, *kret- (strong; powerful).

Adjective

hart

  1. hard

Derived terms

  • hartī

Descendants

  • Middle High German: hart, herte
    • Alemannic German: hert
      Swabian: hirrt
    • Central Franconian: haat
    • German: hart
    • Luxembourgish: haart
    • Yiddish: האַרט(hart)

Old Norse

Adjective

hart

  1. strong neuter nominative/accusative singular of harðr

Polish

Etymology

From German Härte, from Old High German hartī.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xart/
  • Homophone: chart

Noun

hart m inan

  1. strength, resilience, fortitude

Usage notes

On its own, used mainly in the idiom hart ducha. Most of the derived terms are technical and refer to steel hardening.

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verb) hartować
  • (adjective) hartowany

Further reading

  • hart in Polish dictionaries at PWN

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian hert, from Proto-West Germanic *herut.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hat/

Noun

hart n (plural harten, diminutive hartsje)

  1. deer

Derived terms

  • reahart

Further reading

  • “hart (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Alternative forms

  • steg (dialectal), staig (Scotland), stagg, stagge (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English stagge, steg, from Old English stagga, stacga (a stag) and Old Norse steggi, steggr (a male animal), both from Proto-Germanic *staggijô, *staggijaz (male, male deer, porcupine), probably from Proto-Indo-European *stegʰ-, *stengʰ- (to sting; rod, blade; sharp, stiff). Cognate with Icelandic steggi, steggur (tomcat, male fox). Related to staggard, staggon.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun

stag (countable and uncountable, plural stags)

  1. (countable) An adult male deer.
  2. (countable) A colt, or filly.
  3. (by extension, countable, obsolete) A romping girl; a tomboy.
  4. (countable) An improperly or late castrated bull or ram – also called a bull seg (see note under ox).
  5. (countable, finance) An outside irregular dealer in stocks, who is not a member of the exchange.
  6. (countable, finance) One who applies for the allotment of shares in new projects, with a view to sell immediately at a premium, and not to hold the stock.
  7. (countable, usually attributive) An unmarried man; a bachelor; a man not accompanying a women at a social event.
    a stag dance; a stag party; a stag bar
  8. (countable) A social event for men held in honor of a groom on the eve of his wedding, attended by male friends of the groom; sometimes a fundraiser.
    The stag will be held in the hotel’s ballroom.
  9. (uncountable, Britain, military, slang) Guard duty.
    • 2000, Richard Tomlinson, The big breach: from top secret to maximum security (page 31)
      Between shifts on stag or manning the radio, we grabbed a few hours sleep.
  10. (countable) A stag beetle (family Lucanidae).
    • 2007, Eric R. Eaton, Kenn Kaufman, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America (page 132)
      Members of the genus Pasimachus [] can be confused with stag beetles [] but stags have elbowed antennae.
  11. (countable) The Eurasian wren, Troglodytes troglodytes.

Synonyms

  • (male deer): buck, hart
  • (social event): bachelor party (US), stag do (UK informal), stag party, stag lunch

Hyponyms

  • (male red deer): royal stag, imperial stag, monarch

Derived terms

Related terms

  • bull

Translations

Verb

stag (third-person singular simple present stags, present participle stagging, simple past and past participle stagged)

  1. (intransitive, Britain) To act as a “stag”, an irregular dealer in stocks.
  2. (transitive) To watch; to dog, or keep track of.
    Synonym: shadow

Translations

Adverb

stag (not comparable)

  1. Of a man, attending a formal social function without a date.
    My brother went stag to prom because he couldn’t find a date.

Translations

See also

  • bachelorette party, hen party

Anagrams

  • ATGs, GATS, GTAs, Gast, TAGs, gast, gats, tags

Middle English

Noun

stag

  1. Alternative form of stagge

Swedish

Noun

stag ?

  1. (nautical) A stay.
  2. An appliance with a function similar to a nautical stay.

Anagrams

  • gast, sagt, tags

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