haste vs hurry what difference

what is difference between haste and hurry

English

Etymology

Blend of Middle English hasten (verb), (compare Dutch haasten, German hasten, Danish haste, Swedish hasta (to hasten, rush)) and Middle English hast (haste, noun), from Old French haste (whence French hâte), from Old Frankish *hai(f)st (violence), from Proto-Germanic *haifstiz (struggle, conflict), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱeyp- (to ridicule, mock, anger). Akin to Old Frisian hāst, hāste (haste), Old English hǣst (violence), Old English hǣste (violent, impetuous, vehement, adj), Old Norse heift/heipt (feud), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (haifsts, rivalry). Cognate with German and Danish heftig (vehement). (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /heɪst/
  • Rhymes: -eɪst

Noun

haste (usually uncountable, plural hastes)

  1. Speed; swiftness; dispatch.
    We were running late so we finished our meal in haste.
    • The king’s business required haste.
    • 2017, Russell M. Peterson, The Armies of Forever (page 368)
      There was a stampede as the congressmen jumped the banister in their hastes to be the first to sign away their souls.
  2. (obsolete) Urgency; sudden excitement of feeling or passion; precipitance; vehemence.
    • I said in my haste, All men are liars.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

haste (third-person singular simple present hastes, present participle hasting, simple past and past participle hasted)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To urge onward; to hasten.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To move with haste.

Synonyms

  • (move with haste): hurry, rush, scamper, scramble, scurry

References

Anagrams

  • ashet, haets, hates, heast, heats, hetas, sateh, sheat

Basque

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Southern) /as̺te/, [as̺.t̪e̞]
  • IPA(key): (Northern) /has̺te/, [ɦas̺.t̪e̞]

Noun

haste inan

  1. Verbal noun of hasi.

Declension


Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦastɛ]
  • Rhymes: -astɛ

Verb

haste (imperative)

  1. second-person plural imperative of hasit

Esperanto

Pronunciation

Adverb

haste

  1. hastily

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhastə/
  • Hyphenation: has‧te
  • Homophone: hasste

Verb

haste

  1. inflection of hasten:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Contraction

haste

  1. (colloquial) contraction of hast du

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

haste (present tense hastar, past tense hasta, past participle hasta, passive infinitive hastast, present participle hastande, imperative hast)

  1. Alternative form of hasta

Old French

Alternative forms

  • hast, ast

Etymology

Borrowed from Frankish *hai(f)st (violence, haste), from Proto-Germanic *haifstiz (conflict, struggle)

Noun

haste f (oblique plural hastes, nominative singular haste, nominative plural hastes)

  1. urgency, haste, speed

Derived terms

  • haster
  • hasteier
  • hastece, hastance
  • hastif

Descendants

  • Middle French: haste
    • French: hâte
  • Walloon: hausse (Forrières), håsse (Liégeois)
  • Middle Dutch: haest, haeste, haste, hast (reborrowing)
    • Dutch: haast
      • Afrikaans: haas
    • West Flemish: hoast
    • Middle Low German: hāst
      • Middle High German: hāst
        • German: Hast
  • Middle English: haste, hast
    • English: haste

References


Portuguese

Etymology

From hasta.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈaʃtɨ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈastʃi/

Noun

haste f (plural hastes)

  1. pole
  2. (botany) stem, stalk

Derived terms

  • hastear

Further reading

  • “haste” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.


English

Etymology

From Middle English horien (to rush, impel), probably a variation of hurren (to vibrate rapidly, buzz), from Proto-Germanic *hurzaną (to rush) (compare Middle High German hurren (to hasten), Norwegian hurre (to whirl around)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱers- (to run) (compare Latin currō (I run), Tocharian A kursär/Tocharian B kwärsar (league; course)). Related to hurr, horse, rush.

Alternative etymology derives hurry as a variant of harry, which see.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhʌɹ.i/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhʌɹ.i/ (accents without the hurryfurry merger)
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈhɝ.i] (accents with the hurryfurry merger)
  • Rhymes: -ʌri

Noun

hurry (countable and uncountable, plural hurries)

  1. Rushed action.
  2. Urgency.
  3. (American football) an incidence of a defensive player forcing the quarterback to act faster than the quarterback was prepared to, resulting in a failed offensive play.
  4. (music) A tremolando passage for violins, etc., accompanying an exciting situation.

Derived terms

  • in a hurry

Translations

Verb

hurry (third-person singular simple present hurries, present participle hurrying, simple past and past participle hurried)

  1. (intransitive) To do things quickly.
  2. (intransitive) Often with up, to speed up the rate of doing something.
  3. (transitive) To cause to be done quickly.
  4. (transitive) To hasten; to impel to greater speed; to urge on.
    • the rapid Stream presently draws him in , carries him away , and hurries him down violently.
  5. (transitive) To impel to precipitate or thoughtless action; to urge to confused or irregular activity.
  6. (mining) To put: to convey coal in the mine, e.g. from the working to the tramway.
    • 1842, The Condition and Treatment of the Children Employed in the Mines, page 45:
      Elizabeth Day, aged seventeen [] “I have been nearly nine years in the pit. I trapped for two years when I first went, and have hurried ever since. I have hurried for my father until a year ago. I have to help to riddle and fill, []

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:rush

Translations

See also

  • haste
  • hurry up
  • di di mau

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