haste vs rushing what difference

what is difference between haste and rushing

English

Etymology

Blend of Middle English hasten (verb), (compare Dutch haasten, German hasten, Danish haste, Swedish hasta (to hasten, rush)) and Middle English hast (haste, noun), from Old French haste (whence French hâte), from Old Frankish *hai(f)st (violence), from Proto-Germanic *haifstiz (struggle, conflict), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱeyp- (to ridicule, mock, anger). Akin to Old Frisian hāst, hāste (haste), Old English hǣst (violence), Old English hǣste (violent, impetuous, vehement, adj), Old Norse heift/heipt (feud), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (haifsts, rivalry). Cognate with German and Danish heftig (vehement). (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /heɪst/
  • Rhymes: -eɪst

Noun

haste (usually uncountable, plural hastes)

  1. Speed; swiftness; dispatch.
    We were running late so we finished our meal in haste.
    • The king’s business required haste.
    • 2017, Russell M. Peterson, The Armies of Forever (page 368)
      There was a stampede as the congressmen jumped the banister in their hastes to be the first to sign away their souls.
  2. (obsolete) Urgency; sudden excitement of feeling or passion; precipitance; vehemence.
    • I said in my haste, All men are liars.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

haste (third-person singular simple present hastes, present participle hasting, simple past and past participle hasted)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To urge onward; to hasten.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To move with haste.

Synonyms

  • (move with haste): hurry, rush, scamper, scramble, scurry

References

Anagrams

  • ashet, haets, hates, heast, heats, hetas, sateh, sheat

Basque

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Southern) /as̺te/, [as̺.t̪e̞]
  • IPA(key): (Northern) /has̺te/, [ɦas̺.t̪e̞]

Noun

haste inan

  1. Verbal noun of hasi.

Declension


Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦastɛ]
  • Rhymes: -astɛ

Verb

haste (imperative)

  1. second-person plural imperative of hasit

Esperanto

Pronunciation

Adverb

haste

  1. hastily

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhastə/
  • Hyphenation: has‧te
  • Homophone: hasste

Verb

haste

  1. inflection of hasten:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Contraction

haste

  1. (colloquial) contraction of hast du

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

haste (present tense hastar, past tense hasta, past participle hasta, passive infinitive hastast, present participle hastande, imperative hast)

  1. Alternative form of hasta

Old French

Alternative forms

  • hast, ast

Etymology

Borrowed from Frankish *hai(f)st (violence, haste), from Proto-Germanic *haifstiz (conflict, struggle)

Noun

haste f (oblique plural hastes, nominative singular haste, nominative plural hastes)

  1. urgency, haste, speed

Derived terms

  • haster
  • hasteier
  • hastece, hastance
  • hastif

Descendants

  • Middle French: haste
    • French: hâte
  • Walloon: hausse (Forrières), håsse (Liégeois)
  • Middle Dutch: haest, haeste, haste, hast (reborrowing)
    • Dutch: haast
      • Afrikaans: haas
    • West Flemish: hoast
    • Middle Low German: hāst
      • Middle High German: hāst
        • German: Hast
  • Middle English: haste, hast
    • English: haste

References


Portuguese

Etymology

From hasta.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈaʃtɨ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈastʃi/

Noun

haste f (plural hastes)

  1. pole
  2. (botany) stem, stalk

Derived terms

  • hastear

Further reading

  • “haste” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹʌʃɪŋ/
  • Hyphenation: rush‧ing
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃɪŋ

Verb

rushing

  1. present participle of rush

Noun

rushing (plural rushings)

  1. A rapid surging motion.
    • 1841, Alexander Tweedie, William Wood Gerhard, A system of practical medicine
      [] the impediment to the entrance of air into the corresponding portions of the lung is sufficient to produce a succession of interrupted rushings of that fluid during the efforts of respiration []

Adjective

rushing (comparative more rushing, superlative most rushing)

  1. Rapidly flowing or surging.
  2. (Canada, US, dated) Full of activity, busy.
    • 1897, Opie Read, Odd Folks, New York: F. Tennyson Neely, “The Greek God Barber,” p. 45,[1]
      “I have been in Chicago.”
      “Yes, I’ll bet you have,” Bocage mused.
      “But it is too rushing for my nerves,” Stockbridge continued.
    • 1917, Marion G. Kirkpatrick, The Rural School from Within, Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, Chapter 13, p. 141,[2]
      There are a few months in the winter when business on the farm is less rushing than during other times []
    • 1921, George Wesley Davis, Sketches of Butte, Boston: Cornhill, Chapter 18, p. 166,[3]
      In the places where “hard licker” was still to be had patrons were lined in front of the bar in a double rank and the trade in bottled goods was as rushing as the bar patronage.
    • 1932, “Book Exchange Will Continue Payments,” The McGill Daily, Volume 22, No. 19, 26 October, 1932, p. 4,[4]
      Over two hundred and fifty customers invaded the Book Exchange Monday and Tuesday as its portals swung open to those who were to receive cash payment for books sold. So rushing was the business yesterday that $500 which the executive had on hand was paid out long before the proposed closing time.
    • 1937, Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, University of Illinois Press, 1978, Chapter 5, p. 66,[5]
      Janie was astonished to see the money Jody had spent for the land come back to him so fast. Ten new families bought lots and moved to town in six weeks. It all looked too big and rushing for her to keep track of.

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