hasty vs precipitous what difference

what is difference between hasty and precipitous

English

Etymology

From Middle English hasty, of unclear origin. Likely a new formation in Middle English equivalent to haste +‎ -y, found as in other Germanic languages (Old Frisian hastig, Middle Dutch haestigh (> Dutch haastig (hasty)), Middle Low German hastich (hasty), German hastig, Danish hastig, Swedish hastig (hasty)); otherwise possibly representing an assimilation to the foregoing of Middle English hastive, hastif (> English hastive), from Old French hastif (Modern French hâtif), from Frankish *haifst (violence), of same ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈheɪsti/
  • Rhymes: -eɪsti

Adjective

hasty (comparative hastier, superlative hastiest)

  1. Acting in haste; being too hurried or quick
    • 1610, Alexander Cooke, Pope Joane, in William Oldys, editor, The Harleian Miscellany: or, A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, as well in Manuscript as in Print, Found in the Late Earl of Oxford’s Library: Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes: With a Table of the Contents, and an Alphabetical Index, volume IV, London: Printed for T[homas] Osborne, in Gray’s-Inn, 1744, OCLC 5325177; republished as John Maltham, editor, The Harleian Miscellany; or, A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, as well in Manuscript as in Print, Found in the Late Earl of Oxford’s Library, Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes, volume IV, London: Printed for R. Dutton, 1808–1811, OCLC 30776079, page 95:
      If there bee any lasie fellow, any that cannot away with worke, any that would wallow in pleasures, hee is hastie to be priested. And when hee is made one, and has gotten a benefice, he consorts with his neighbour priests, who are altogether given to pleasures; and then both hee, and they, live, not like Christians, but like epicures; drinking, eating, feasting, and revelling, till the cow come home, as the saying is.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • sayth, yasht


English

Etymology

From obsolete French précipiteux, from Vulgar Latin *praecipitosus. Equivalent to precipice (steep) +‎ -ous.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹɪˈsɪpɪtəs/

Adjective

precipitous

  1. Steep, like a precipice
  2. Headlong
  3. Hasty; rash; quick; sudden

Synonyms

  • (steep): brant, steep-to
  • (headlong): headlong, precipitant, precipitous
  • (hasty, rash): heedless, hotheaded, impetuous; see also Thesaurus:reckless
  • (sudden): abrupt, precipitous, subitaneous; see also Thesaurus:sudden

Translations


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