hat vs lid what difference

what is difference between hat and lid

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /hæt/
  • (Canada, California, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): [hat]
  • (Northern US) IPA(key): [hɛt]
  • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1

From Middle English hat, from Old English hæt (head-covering, hat), from Proto-Germanic *hattuz (hat), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to guard, cover, care for, protect). Cognate with North Frisian hat (hat), Danish hat (hat), Swedish hatt (hat), Icelandic hattur (hat), Latin cassis (helmet), Lithuanian kudas (bird’s crest or tuft), Avestan ????????????????????(xaoda, hat), Persian خود(xud, helmet), Welsh cadw (to provide for, ensure). Compare also hood.

Noun

hat (plural hats)

  1. A covering for the head, often in the approximate form of a cone or a cylinder closed at its top end, and sometimes having a brim and other decoration.
    • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
  2. (figuratively) A particular role or capacity that a person might fill.
    • 1993, Susan Loesser, A Most Remarkable Fella: Frank Loesser and the Guys and Dolls in His Life: A Portrait by His Daughter, Hal Leonard Corporation (2000), →ISBN, p.121:
      My mother was wearing several hats in the early fifties: hostess, scout, wife, and mother.
  3. (figuratively) Any receptacle from which numbers/names are pulled out in a lottery.
    1. (figuratively, by extension) The lottery or draw itself.
  4. (video games) A hat switch.
    • 2002, Ernest Pazera, Focus on SDL, p.139:
      The third type of function allows you to check on the state of the joystick’s buttons, axes, hats, and balls.
  5. (typography, nonstandard, rare) The háček symbol.
    • 1997 October 6th, “Patricia V. Lehman” (user name), rec.antiques (Usenet newsgroup), “Re: Unusual Mark – made in Cechoslovakia”, Message ID: <34390399.BD7@umich.edu>#1/1
      I’lll have to leave it up to antiques experts to tell you when objects were marked that way, but I can tell you it’s called a “hacek” (with the hat over the “c” and pronounced “hacheck”.) It is used to show that a “c” is pronounced as “ch” and an “s” as “sh.” Sometimes linguists just call it the “hat.”
  6. (programming, informal) The caret symbol ^.
  7. (Internet slang) User rights on a website, such as the right to edit pages others cannot.
  8. (Cambridge University slang, obsolete) A student who is also the son of a nobleman (and so allowed to wear a hat instead of a mortarboard).
Synonyms
  • (student and nobleman): gold hatband, tuft
Hyponyms
  • See also Thesaurus:headwear
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: ati
Translations
See also
  • take one’s hat off to

Verb

hat (third-person singular simple present hats, present participle hatting, simple past and past participle hatted)

  1. (transitive) To place a hat on.
  2. (transitive) To appoint as cardinal.
    • 1929, “Five New Hats,” Time, 2 December, 1929, [2]
      It was truly a breathtaking rise. From the quiet school, Pope Pius XI had jumped Father Verdier over the heads of innumerable Bishops, made him Archbishop of Paris. Soon he was to be hatted a Prince of the Church and put in charge of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame.
  3. (intransitive) To shop for hats.
    • 1920, Katharine Metcalf Roof, The Great Demonstration (page 122)
      We might just go hatting this afternoon []
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      Watt’s need of semantic succour was at times so great that he would set to trying names on things, and on himself, almost as a woman hats.

Etymology 2

Verb

hat

  1. (Scotland, Northern England or obsolete) simple past tense of hit
References
  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Further reading

  • hat on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • ATH, aht, tha

Cimbrian

Verb

hat

  1. third-person singular present indicative of haban

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse hattr, hǫttr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /had/, [hæd̥], [hæt]

Noun

hat c (singular definite hatten, plural indefinite hatte)

  1. hat

Inflection


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Verb

hat

  1. third-person singular present of haben

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɒt]
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Etymology 1

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *kutte (six). Cognates include Finnish kuusi, Mansi хо̄т (hōt), Khanty хәт (xət).

Numeral

hat

  1. six
Declension
Derived terms

(Non-institutionalized adjectival compounds with single-element numerals [excerpt]):
hatezres, hatmilliós, hatmilliárdos, hatbilliós; hatméteres, hatcentis, hatkilós, hatdekás, hatgrammos, hattonnás, hatliteres; hatwattos, hatamperes; hatperces, hatórás, hatórai, hatórányi, hatnapi, hatnapos, hathetes, hatheti, hatéves, hatévi, hathavi; hatpercenként, hatóránként, hatnaponta, hatnaponként, hathetente, hathetenként, hathavonta, hathavonként, hatévente, hatévenként; hatfokos, hatfokú, hatirányú, hatoldalas, hatoldalú, hatkötetes, hatdimenziós, hatszázalékos, hatkerekű, hatfős, hatfőnyi, hatnyelvű, hatgyerekes / hatgyermekes, hattagú, hatelemű, hatrészes, hatemeletes, hatszintes, hatablakos, hatajtós, hatüléses, hatjegyű, hatpontos, hatszavas, hatbetűs, hatsoros; hatforintos, hatdolláros, hateurós; hatlábú, hatágú, hatfejű, hatkezű, hatkarú, hatszemű, hatfülű, hatlevelű.

Etymology 2

[after 1372] From Proto-Uralic *kattɜ- (to penetrate, go ahead, move somewhere). The suffix -hat/-het originated from this verb.

Verb

hat

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) to get, arrive at, pass, progress towards (a certain location)
    Synonyms: hatol, ér, jut
    • 1863, János Arany, Rege a csodaszarvasról (The Legend of the Wondrous Hunt, translated by E.D. Butler)
      Süppedékes mély tavaknak / Szigetére ők behatnak.

      An island fair to reach, they pass / Through treacherous pool and deep morass.
  2. (intransitive, archaic or literary) to enter, penetrate
    Synonym: hatol
  3. (intransitive) to take effect, to be effective, to work
    Synonyms: hatásos, működik, beválik
  4. (intransitive) to affect, to have influence, to act (on something -ra/-re)
    Synonyms: kihat, érint, befolyásol
  5. (intransitive) to seem, appear (as something -nak/-nek)
    Synonyms: tűnik, látszik
Conjugation
Derived terms

(With verbal prefixes):

References

Further reading

  • (six): hat in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (to take effect): hat in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hat̪ˠ/

Noun

hat

  1. h-prothesized form of at

Verb

hat

  1. h-prothesized form of at

Kholosi

Etymology

From Sanskrit हस्त (hasta).

Noun

hat ?

  1. (anatomy) hand

References

  • Eric Anonby; Hassan Mohebi Bahmani (2014), “Shipwrecked and Landlocked: Kholosi, an Indo-Aryan Language in South-west Iran”, in Cahier de Studia Iranica xx[3], pages 13-36

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haːt/

Verb

hat

  1. inflection of hunn:
    1. first/third-person singular preterite indicative
    2. second-person plural preterite indicative

Verb

hat

  1. inflection of haen:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Maricopa

Noun

hat (plural haat)

  1. dog

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hæt, hætt, from Proto-Germanic *hattuz.

Alternative forms

  • hatt, hatte, hæt

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hat/

Noun

hat (plural hattes or hatten)

  1. A hat or cap; a piece of headgear or headwear.
  2. A helmet; a hat used as armour.
  3. (rare) A circlet or tiara; a ring-shaped piece of headgear.
  4. (rare) A circle of foam or mist.
  5. (rare) A area of hilly woodland.
Related terms
  • hater
  • haterynge
  • hatten
  • hattere
  • ketil-hat
Descendants
  • Scots: hat, hatt, hate, hait
  • English: hat
  • Irish: hata
References
  • “hat, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-18.

Etymology 2

Noun

hat

  1. Alternative form of hate

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian hit.

Pronoun

hat

  1. it

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

Noun

hat n (definite singular hatet, indefinite plural hat, definite plural hata or hatene)

  1. hatred, hate
Derived terms
  • hatefull
  • hater
Related terms
  • hate (verb)

Etymology 2

Verb

hat

  1. imperative of hate

References

  • “hat” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɑːt/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz. Akin to English hate.

Noun

hat n (definite singular hatet, indefinite plural hat, definite plural hata)

  1. hatred, hate

Derived terms

  • hatar
  • hatefull

Etymology 2

Verb

hat

  1. imperative of hate

References

  • “hat” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xɑːt/, [hɑːt]

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *haitaz. Cognate with Old Frisian hēt (West Frisian hjit), Old Saxon hēt, Dutch heet, Old High German heiz (German heiß), Old Norse heitr (Swedish het). Cognate to Albanian ethe (shiver, fiever), dialectal hethe and ith (warmth, body heat), dialectal hith.

Adjective

hāt

  1. hot, fierce
Declension
Descendants
  • Middle English: hot, hoth, whote
    • English: hot
    • Scots: hat, hait, hate
    • Yola: hoat, hote

Etymology 2

From hātan.

Noun

hāt n

  1. a promise

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɑːt/

Noun

hat n (uncountable)

  1. hatred, haught

Declension

Related terms

  • hata
  • hatbrott
  • judehat
  • rashat

Tok Pisin

Etymology 1

From English hat.

Noun

hat

  1. hat

Etymology 2

From English hard.

Adverb

hat

  1. hard
Related terms
  • hatpela
  • hatwok

Turkish

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish خط‎, from Arabic خَطّ(ḵaṭṭ).

Noun

hat (definite accusative hattı, plural hatlar)

  1. line
  2. writing

Declension


Turkmen

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic خَطّ(ḵaṭṭ).

Noun

hat (definite accusative haty, plural hatlar)

  1. letter (written message)

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English lid, lyd, from Old English hlid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą (compare Dutch lid, German Lid (eyelid), Swedish lid (gate)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlitós (covered), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱley- (to cover).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɪd/
  • Rhymes: -ɪd

Noun

lid (plural lids)

  1. The top or cover of a container.
  2. (slang) A cap or hat.
  3. (slang) One ounce of cannabis.
  4. (surfing, slang, chiefly Australia) A bodyboard or bodyboarder.
    • 2001, realsurf.com message board
      Mal rider, shortboard or lid everyone surfs like a kook sometimes.
    • 2003 August, Kneelo Knews
      the rest of us managed to dodge out of control lid riders
  5. (slang) A motorcyclist’s crash helmet.
  6. (slang) In amateur radio, an incompetent operator.
  7. Clipping of eyelid.
    • Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped ; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth [].
  8. (microelectronics) A hermetically sealed top piece on a microchip such as the integrated heat spreader on a CPU.
  9. (figuratively) A restraint or control, as when “putting a lid” on something.
    • 2011, Dave Ramsey, EntreLeadership (page 11)
      Basically he says that there is a lid on my organization and on my future, and that lid is me. I am the problem with my company and you are the problem with your company.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

lid (third-person singular simple present lids, present participle lidding, simple past and past participle lidded)

  1. (transitive) To put a lid on (something).
    Antonym: unlid

Derived terms

  • unlid

Translations

Anagrams

  • -dil, -dil-, DIL, DLI, IDL, dil-

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch lid.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [lət]

Noun

lid (plural lede, diminutive lidjie)

  1. member (of a group or club)
  2. member, limb

Derived terms

  • lidmaat

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ľudъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɪt]

Noun

lid m

  1. people

Declension

Derived terms

  • lidový
  • lidnatý
  • lidumil
  • zalidnění
  • přelidnění

Further reading

  • lid in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • lid in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse hlít.

Noun

lid c (singular definite liden, not used in plural form)

  1. trust

Verb

lid

  1. imperative of lide

Further reading

  • “lid” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɪt/
  • Hyphenation: lid
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch lit, let, leet, from Old Dutch *lid, from Proto-Germanic *liþuz.

Noun

lid n (plural leden, diminutive lidje n or ledeken n)

  1. member (of a group)
    Synonym: lidmaat
  2. member, limb (extremity of a body)
    Synonym: ledemaat
  3. member, penis
  4. (obsolete, grammar) article, particularly in the Southern diminutive form ledeken [from late 16th c.]
    Synonyms: lidwoord, voorlid
Derived terms
  • baarlid
  • erelid
  • gemeenteraadslid
  • kamerlid
  • ledemaat
  • ledenbestand
  • ledental
  • lidmaat
  • lidwoord
  • raadslid
  • regeringslid
  • voorlid
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: lid
  • Indonesian: lid
  • Negerhollands: lid, leden, leeden

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch lit, let, from Old Dutch *lid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą.

Noun

lid n (plural leden, diminutive lidje n)

  1. (rare) lid, cover
Derived terms
  • ooglid

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch lid (member), from Middle Dutch lit, let, leet, from Old Dutch *lid, from Proto-Germanic *liþuz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɪt]
  • Hyphenation: lid

Noun

lid (first-person possessive lidku, second-person possessive lidmu, third-person possessive lidnya)

  1. (colloquial) member (of a group).
    Synonym: anggota

Further reading

  • “lid” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • lyd, lidde, lidd, lydde

Etymology

From Old English hlid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lid/

Noun

lid (plural liddis)

  1. A lid; a piece of material used to cover a container.
  2. The exterior of a gravesite, ditch, or pit.
  3. The covering over one’s eyes; an eyelid.
  4. (rare) The top layer of a pastry dish.

Descendants

  • English: lid
  • Scots: lid

References

  • “lid, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-11-29.

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

lid

  1. imperative of lide

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • lir (short form)
  • lider (non-standard since 2012)

Verb

lid

  1. present tense of lida and lide
  2. imperative of lida and lide

Etymology 2

Noun

lid f (definite singular lidi, indefinite plural lider, definite plural liderne)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 1917; superseded by li

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *liþuz, whence also Old English liþ and Old Norse liðr.

Noun

lid ?

  1. member

Descendants

  • Middle High German: lit
    • Alemannic German: Lid
    • German: Lied

Spanish

Etymology

From Old Spanish, from Latin lītem, singular accusative of līs (strife, dispute, quarrel).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlid/, [ˈlið̞]
  • Rhymes: -id

Noun

lid f (plural lides)

  1. lawsuit
    Synonym: litigio
  2. fight
    Synonym: lucha

Derived terms

  • en buena lid

Related terms

  • lidiar
  • litigar
  • litigio

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -iːd

Noun

lid c

  1. A slope of a hill.

Declension

Verb

lid

  1. imperative of lida.

Volapük

Etymology

From German Lied.

Noun

lid (nominative plural lids)

  1. song

Declension


Welsh

Noun

lid

  1. Soft mutation of llid.

Mutation


Westrobothnian

Alternative forms

  • li
  • löyd

Etymology

From Old Norse hlíð, from Proto-Germanic *hlīþō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /liː/, /lʏɪ̯ːd/
    Rhymes: -íːð
    (ð-dropping) Rhymes: -íː, -íːð
    (í-ý merger) Rhymes: -íːð, -ýːð

Noun

lid f (definite singular lia or lida, dative lin)

  1. mountain side, wooded slope of a mountain or summit

Usage notes

It lies in the concept of this denomination in Westrobothnia, that the slope should be available either for cultivation or at least bear grass and healthy forest. Many villages and homes have hereof names.

Derived terms

  • baklid

References


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