hatchet vs tomahawk what difference

what is difference between hatchet and tomahawk

English

Etymology

From Middle English hachet, a borrowing from Old French hachete, diminutive of hache (axe), from Frankish *hapja, *happija, from Proto-Germanic *hapjō, *habjō (knife), from Proto-Indo-European *kop- (to strike, to beat). Cognate with Old High German happa, heppa, habba (reaper, sickle), German Hippe (billhook).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhætʃɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ætʃɪt

Noun

hatchet (plural hatchets)

  1. A small light axe with a short handle; a tomahawk.
    • 1855, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Song of Hiawatha
      Buried was the bloody hatchet.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

hatchet (third-person singular simple present hatchets, present participle hatcheting or hatchetting, simple past and past participle hatcheted or hatchetted)

  1. (transitive) To cut with a hatchet.


English

Etymology

From an Eastern Algonquian word, most likely Powhatan tumahák; compare also Malecite-Passamaquoddy tomhikon (ax), Abenaki temahigan, demahigan (ax).

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈtɑ.mə.hɔk/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɒ.mə.hɔːk/

Noun

tomahawk (plural tomahawks)

  1. An ax used by Native American warriors.
    • 1615, Ralph Hamor, A True Discourse of the Present State of Virginia (published in Richmond in 1957), page 13:
      yeerely bring into our store house, at the beginning of their haruest two bushels of corne a man [] for which they should receiue so many Iron Tomahawkes or small hatchets.
  2. (basketball) A dunk in which the person dunking the ball does so with his arm behind his head.
  3. (geometry) A geometric construction consisting of a semicircle and two line segments that serves as a tool for trisecting an angle; so called from its resemblance to the American Indian axe.
  4. (field hockey) A field hockey shot style that involves a player turning their hockey stick upside-down and swinging it so that its inside edge will come into contact with the ball.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

tomahawk (third-person singular simple present tomahawks, present participle tomahawking, simple past and past participle tomahawked)

  1. To strike with a tomahawk.
    • 1906, FE Smith, maiden speech to House of Commons, 12 Mar 1906:
      Not satisfied with tomahawking our colleagues in the country, they ask the scanty remnant in the House to join in the scalp dance.

Derived terms

  • tomahawker
  • tomahawking

Translations

References


French

Etymology

From an Eastern Algonquian language; see English entry for more.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɔ.ma.ok/

Noun

tomahawk m (plural tomahawks)

  1. tomahawk

Further reading

  • “tomahawk” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Polish

Etymology

From English tomahawk, from Powhatan tumahák.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //tɔˈma.xɔk//

Noun

tomahawk m inan

  1. tomahawk (American Indian axe)

Declension

Further reading

  • tomahawk in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • tomahawk in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Noun

tomahawk m (plural tomahawks)

  1. tomahawk (type of American Indian axe)

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