hawk vs pitch what difference

what is difference between hawk and pitch

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: hôk, IPA(key): /hɔːk/
  • (US) enPR: hôk, IPA(key): /hɔk/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: häk, IPA(key): /hɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːk
  • Homophone: hock (accents with cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English hauk, hauke, hawke, havek, from Old English hafoc (hawk), from Proto-West Germanic *habuk, from Proto-Germanic *habukaz (compare West Frisian hauk, German Low German Haavke, Dutch havik, German Habicht, Swedish hök, Danish høg, Norwegian Bokmål hauk, Norwegian Nynorsk hauk, Faroese heykur, Icelandic haukur), from Proto-Indo-European *kopuǵos (compare Latin capys, capus (bird of prey), Albanian gabonjë, shkabë (eagle), Russian ко́бец (kóbec, falcon), Polish kobuz (Eurasian Hobby)), perhaps ultimately derived from *keh₂p- (seize).

Noun

hawk (plural hawks)

  1. A diurnal predatory bird of the family Accipitridae, smaller than an eagle.
  2. Any diurnal predatory terrestrial bird of similar size and appearance to the accipitrid hawks, such as a falcon.
  3. (entomology) Any of various species of dragonfly of the genera Apocordulia and Austrocordulia, endemic to Australia.
  4. (politics) An advocate of aggressive political positions and actions. [from 1962]
    Synonyms: warmonger, war hawk
    Antonym: dove
  5. (game theory) An uncooperative or purely-selfish participant in an exchange or game, especially when untrusting, acquisitive or treacherous. Refers specifically to the Prisoner’s Dilemma, alias the Hawk-Dove game.
    Antonym: dove
Hyponyms
Related terms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • creshawk
  • goshawk
  • sparhawk
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: aka
Translations

Verb

hawk (third-person singular simple present hawks, present participle hawking, simple past and past participle hawked)

  1. (transitive) To hunt with a hawk.
  2. (intransitive) To make an attack while on the wing; to soar and strike like a hawk.
    • But whether upward to the moon they go, Or dream the winter out in caves below, Or hawk at flies elsewhere
Translations
Derived terms
  • hawk after
  • hawk at
  • hawk for
  • hawker
  • hawking

Etymology 2

Uncertain origin; perhaps from Middle English hache (battle-axe), or from a variant use of the above.

Noun

hawk (plural hawks)

  1. A plasterer’s tool, made of a flat surface with a handle below, used to hold an amount of plaster prior to application to the wall or ceiling being worked on: a mortarboard.
    Synonym: mortarboard
Derived terms
  • hawk boy, hawk-boy
Translations

Etymology 3

Back-formation from hawker.

Verb

hawk (third-person singular simple present hawks, present participle hawking, simple past and past participle hawked)

  1. (transitive) To sell; to offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle.
    The vendors were hawking their wares from little tables lining either side of the market square.
    • 1713, Jonathan Swift, Imitation of Horace, Book I. Ep. VII.
      His works were hawked in every street.
Derived terms
  • hawked
  • hawkery
  • hawking
  • hawky
Related terms
  • hawker
Translations

Etymology 4

Onomatopoeic.

Noun

hawk (plural hawks)

  1. A noisy effort to force up phlegm from the throat.
Synonyms
  • hawking (noun)
Translations

Verb

hawk (third-person singular simple present hawks, present participle hawking, simple past and past participle hawked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To expectorate, to cough up something from one’s throat.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, I. xvi. 117
      He hawked up, with incredible straining, the interjection ah!
    • 1953, Saul Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March, Viking Press, chapter 3:
      He had a new tough manner of pulling down breath and hawking into the street.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To try to cough up something from one’s throat; to clear the throat loudly.
Derived terms
  • hawking (noun)
Translations

See also

  • Hawkshaw, hawkshaw
  • Hawkubite
  • winkle-hawk

Further reading

  • hawk on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Manx

Noun

hawk

  1. Lenited form of shawk.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English picche, piche, pich, from Old English piċ, from Proto-West Germanic *pik, from Latin pix. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Pik (pitch, tar), Dutch pek (pitch, tar), German Low German Pick (pitch, tar), German Pech (pitch, tar), and Spanish pegar (to stick, glue).

Noun

pitch (countable and uncountable, plural pitches)

  1. A sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap.
  2. A dark, extremely viscous material remaining in still after distilling crude oil and tar.
  3. (geology) Pitchstone.
Derived terms
  • pitch-black
  • pitchblende
  • pitch-dark
  • pitch darkness
  • pitch-tar
Translations
Descendants
  • Galician: piche
  • Portuguese: piche

See also

  • piceous

Verb

pitch (third-person singular simple present pitches, present participle pitching, simple past and past participle pitched)

  1. To cover or smear with pitch.
    • “Make thee an ark of gopher wood; rooms shalt thou make in the ark, and shalt pitch it within and without with pitch.”
  2. To darken; to blacken; to obscure.
    • 1704 (published), year written unknown, John Dryden, On the Death of Amyntas
      Soon he found / The welkin pitch’d with sullen clouds.

Etymology 2

From Middle English picchen, pycchen (to thrust in, fasten, settle), an assibilated variant of Middle English picken, pikken (to pick, pierce). More at pick.

Noun

pitch (plural pitches)

  1. A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand.
  2. (baseball) The act of pitching a baseball.
  3. (sports, Britain, Australia, New Zealand) The field on which cricket, soccer, rugby or field hockey is played. (In cricket, the pitch is in the centre of the field; see cricket pitch.) Not used in America, where “field” is the preferred word.
  4. An effort to sell or promote something.
  5. The distance between evenly spaced objects, e.g. the teeth of a saw or gear, the turns of a screw thread, the centres of holes, or letters in a monospace font.
    A helical scan with a pitch of zero is equivalent to constant z-axis scanning.
  6. The angle at which an object sits.
  7. A level or degree, or (by extension), a peak or highest degree.
    • September 28, 1710, Joseph Addison, Whig-Examiner No. 2
      He lived at a time when learning was at its highest pitch.
    • 1748, David Hume, Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral, Oxford University Press (1973), section 11:
      But, except the mind be disordered by disease or madness, they never can arrive at such a pitch of vivacity
    • 2014, James Booth, Philip Larkin: Life, Art and Love (page 190)
      In this poem his ‘vernacular’ bluster and garish misrhymes build to a pitch of rowdy anarchy []
  8. The rotation angle about the transverse axis.
    1. (nautical, aviation) The degree to which a vehicle, especially a ship or aircraft, rotates on such an axis, tilting its bow or nose up or down. Compare with roll, yaw, and heave.
    2. (aviation) A measure of the angle of attack of a propeller.
  9. An area in a market (or similar) allocated to a particular trader.
  10. (by extension) The place where a busker performs, a prostitute solicits clients, or an illegal gambling game etc. is set up before the public.
    • 1975, Tom A. Cullen, The Prostitutes’ Padre (page 94)
      Another reason is that the prostitute who makes her pitch at Marble Arch stands a chance of being picked up by an out-of-town business man stopping at one of the hotels in the vicinity, and of being treated to a steak dinner []
  11. An area on a campsite intended for occupation by a single tent, caravan or similar.
  12. A point or peak; the extreme point of elevation or depression.
  13. Prominence; importance.
  14. (climbing) A section of a climb or rock face; specifically, the climbing distance between belays or stances.
    • 1967, Anthony Greenbank, Instructions in Mountaineering (page 84)
      You lead “through” instead — your companion leads a pitch, then you join him. But instead of swapping over at the ice axe belay, you carry on in the lead, cutting or kicking steps until you are about twenty feet above.
  15. (caving) A vertical cave passage, only negotiable by using rope or ladders.
  16. (now Britain, regional) A person’s or animal’s height.
  17. (cricket) That point of the ground on which the ball pitches or lights when bowled.
  18. A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.
  19. The point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; a descending slope; the degree or rate of descent or slope; slant.
  20. (mining) The limit of ground set to a miner who receives a share of the ore taken out.
Hyponyms
  • football pitch
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

pitch (third-person singular simple present pitches, present participle pitching, simple past and past participle pitched or (obsolete) pight)

  1. (transitive) To throw.
  2. (transitive or intransitive, baseball) To throw (the ball) toward a batter at home plate.
  3. (intransitive, baseball) To play baseball in the position of pitcher.
  4. (transitive) To throw away; discard.
  5. (transitive) To promote, advertise, or attempt to sell.
  6. (transitive) To deliver in a certain tone or style, or with a certain audience in mind.
  7. (transitive) To assemble or erect (a tent).
  8. (intransitive) To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.
    • Laban with his brethren pitched in the Mount of Gilead.
  9. (transitive, intransitive, aviation or nautical) To move so that the front of an aircraft or boat goes alternatively up and down.
  10. (transitive, golf) To play a short, high, lofty shot that lands with backspin.
  11. (intransitive, cricket) To bounce on the playing surface.
  12. (intransitive, Bristol, of snow) To settle and build up, without melting.
  13. (intransitive, archaic) To alight; to settle; to come to rest from flight.
    • the tree whereon they [the bees] pitch
  14. (with on or upon) To fix one’s choice.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Precepts of Christianity not grievous
      Pitch upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the more easy.
  15. (intransitive) To plunge or fall; especially, to fall forward; to decline or slope.
  16. (transitive, of an embankment, roadway) To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  17. (transitive, of a price, value) To set or fix.
  18. (transitive, card games, slang, of a card) To discard for some gain.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Unknown. Perhaps related to the above sense of level or degree, or influenced by it.

Noun

pitch (plural pitches)

  1. (music, phonetics) The perceived frequency of a sound or note.
    The pitch of middle “C” is familiar to many musicians.
  2. (music) In an a cappella group, the singer responsible for singing a note for the other members to tune themselves by.
    Bob, our pitch, let out a clear middle “C” and our conductor gave the signal to start.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

pitch (third-person singular simple present pitches, present participle pitching, simple past and past participle pitched)

  1. (intransitive) To produce a note of a given pitch.
    • [] now the orchestra is playing yellow cocktail music and the opera of voices pitches a key higher.
  2. (transitive) To fix or set the tone of.
    • 1955, Rex Stout, “Die Like a Dog”, in Three Witnesses, October 1994 Bantam edition, →ISBN, pages 196–197:
      His “hello” was enough to recognize his voice by. I pitched mine low so he wouldn’t know it.
Translations

References

  • pitch in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • pitch on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pitʃ/

Noun

pitch m (plural pitchs)

  1. pitch (sales patter, inclination)

Italian

Noun

pitch m

  1. (cricket) cricket pitch

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