hawse vs hawsehole what difference

what is difference between hawse and hawsehole

English

Etymology

Alteration of Middle English halse, from Old Norse hals (neck) (compare Icelandic háls (neck)).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /hɔːz/
  • (US) IPA(key): /hɔz/, /hɔs/

Noun

hawse (plural hawses)

  1. (nautical) The part of the bow containing the hawseholes.
  2. (nautical) A hawsehole or hawsepipe.
  3. (nautical) The horizontal distance or area between an anchored vessel’s bows and the actual position of her anchor(s).

Translations

Adjective

hawse (not comparable)

  1. (nautical) In a position relative to the course and position of a vessel, somewhat forward of the stem.

Adverb

hawse (not comparable)

  1. (nautical, of a vessel) Lying to two anchors, streamed from either bow.

Derived terms

Verb

hawse (third-person singular simple present hawses, present participle hawsing, simple past and past participle hawsed)

  1. (intransitive, nautical, of a vessel) To lie uneasily to an anchor, typically due to a weather tide.

References

Anagrams

  • Hawes, shewa, washe

Scots

Noun

hawse (plural hawses)

  1. halse; neck; throat

Anagrams

  • Hawes


English

Alternative forms

  • hawse hole

Etymology

hawse +‎ hole

Noun

hawsehole (plural hawseholes)

  1. (nautical) The hole through which a ship’s anchor rope is passed.
    • 2004, Nelson H. Lawry, Glen M. Williford, Leo K. Polaski, Portsmouth Harbor’s Military and Naval Heritage, page 86,
      Its overlapping steel plates and the empty hawseholes, from which the anchors will soon be suspended, are visible.
  2. (nautical) A hole in a ship through which a hawser is passed.

Synonyms

  • (hole through which a hawser is passed): cathole

Derived terms

  • through the hawsehole

Translations


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