hazard vs venture what difference

what is difference between hazard and venture

English

Etymology

From Middle English hasard, from Old French hasart (a game of dice) (noun), hasarder (verb), probably from Arabic اَلزَّهْر(az-zahr, the dice). Compare Spanish azar, Portuguese azar.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈhæzɚd/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhazəd/

Noun

hazard (countable and uncountable, plural hazards)

  1. The chance of suffering harm; danger, peril, risk of loss. [from 16th c.]
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, The Difficulties of Obtaining Salvation
      Men are led on from one stage of life to another in a condition of the utmost hazard.
  2. An obstacle or other feature which causes risk or danger; originally in sports, and now applied more generally. [from 19th c.]
  3. (in driving a vehicle) An obstacle or other feature that presents a risk or danger that justifies the driver in taking action to avoid it.
  4. (golf) A sand or water obstacle on a golf course.
  5. (billiards) The act of potting a ball, whether the object ball (winning hazard) or the player’s ball (losing hazard).
  6. (historical) A game of chance played with dice, usually for monetary stakes; popular mainly from 14th c. to 19th c.
  7. Chance. [from 16th c.]
  8. (obsolete) Anything that is hazarded or risked, such as a stake in gambling.
  9. (tennis) The side of the court into which the ball is served.
  10. (programming) A problem with the instruction pipeline in CPU microarchitectures when the next instruction cannot execute in the following clock cycle, potentially leading to incorrect results.

Synonyms

  • (chance): fortune, luck; see also Thesaurus:luck
  • (chance of suffering harm): adventure
  • (anything hazarded or risked): bet, pledge, skin in the game, wager

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

hazard (third-person singular simple present hazards, present participle hazarding, simple past and past participle hazarded)

  1. To expose to chance; to take a risk.
    • a. 1676, John Clarke, Excuses of the Irreligious
      o be consistent , you ought to be a Chriftian in temper and practice ; for you hazard nothing by a course of evangelical obedience
    • He hazards his neck to the halter.
  2. To risk (something); to venture, to incur, or bring on.
    • They hazard to cut their feet.
    I’ll hazard a guess.

Translations


Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from German Hasard, from Old French hasart.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦazart/

Noun

hazard m

  1. gambling
  2. risk, gamble

Declension

References


French

Noun

hazard m (plural hazards)

  1. Archaic spelling of hasard, chiefly used before 1800

Italian

Noun

hazard m (invariable)

  1. hazard lights (on a vehicle)

Middle French

Noun

hazard m (plural hazards)

  1. hazard; obstacle

Descendants

  • French: hasard

Polish

Etymology

From French hasard, from Old French hasart, from Arabic اَلزَّهْر(az-zahr, the dice).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxa.zart/

Noun

hazard m inan

  1. (singular only) gambling
  2. (electronics) race condition

Declension


Romanian

Etymology

From French hasard.

Noun

hazard n (plural hazarduri)

  1. hazard

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xǎzard/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧zard

Noun

hàzard m (Cyrillic spelling ха̀зард)

  1. gamble, gambling
  2. risk, hazard

Declension



English

Etymology

Clipping of adventure.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈvɛn.t͡ʃɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈvɛn.t͡ʃə/
  • Hyphenation: ven‧ture

Noun

venture (plural ventures)

  1. A risky or daring undertaking or journey.
  2. An event that is not, or cannot be, foreseen.
    Synonyms: accident, chance, contingency
  3. The thing risked; especially, something sent to sea in trade.
    Synonym: stake

Hyponyms

  • business venture
  • joint venture

Translations

Verb

venture (third-person singular simple present ventures, present participle venturing, simple past and past participle ventured)

  1. (transitive) To undertake a risky or daring journey.
    • who freights a ship to venture on the seas
  2. (transitive) To risk or offer.
  3. (intransitive) to dare to engage in; to attempt without any certainty of success. Used with at or on
  4. (transitive) To put or send on a venture or chance.
  5. (transitive) To confide in; to rely on; to trust.
  6. (transitive) To say something.

Derived terms

  • venture capital

Related terms

  • venturesome
  • venturous

Translations

Further reading

  • venture in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • venture in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /venˈtu.re/
  • Rhymes: -ure

Adjective

venture

  1. feminine plural of venturo

Noun

venture f

  1. plural of ventura

Latin

Participle

ventūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of ventūrus

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