healthy vs salubrious what difference

what is difference between healthy and salubrious

English

Etymology

From health +‎ -y.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛl.θi/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlθi

Adjective

healthy (comparative healthier or more healthy, superlative healthiest or most healthy)

  1. Enjoying good health; well; free from disease or disorder.
    Antonym: unhealthy
  2. Conducive to health.
    Synonym: healthful
    Antonym: unhealthy
  3. Evincing health.
    Her face had a healthy glow.
  4. (figuratively) Significant, hefty; beneficial.

Usage notes

When a clearer distinction is intended, healthy is used to describe the state of the object, and healthful describes its ability to impart health to the recipient. Vegetables in good condition are both healthy (i.e., not rotten or diseased) and healthful (i.e., they improve the eaters’ health, compared to eating junk food). By contrast, a poisonous plant can be healthy, but it is not healthful to eat it.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • heal
  • healing
  • whole

Translations

Further reading

  • healthy in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • healthy in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Etymology

From Latin salūbris (healthy) +‎ -ous.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sə-lo͞o’brē-əs, IPA(key): /səˈluː.bɹiː.əs/

Adjective

salubrious (comparative more salubrious, superlative most salubrious)

  1. Promoting health or well-being; wholesome, especially as related to air.
    • 2001, Francis Forster, Cockles and Mussels, iUniverse →ISBN, page 133

Synonyms

  • (promoting health or well-being): healthful

Antonyms

  • (promoting health or well-being): insalubrious

Related terms

  • salubriously
  • salubriousness
  • salubrity

Translations


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