heap vs sight what difference

what is difference between heap and sight

English

Etymology

From Middle English heep, from Old English hēap, from Proto-West Germanic *haup, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz (compare Dutch hoop, German Low German Hupen, German Haufen), from Proto-Indo-European *koupos (hill) (compare Lithuanian kaũpas, Albanian qipi (stack), Avestan ????????????????(kåfa)).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hēp, IPA(key): /hiːp/
  • ((Ireland), dated) enPR: hāp, IPA(key): /heːp/
  • Rhymes: -iːp

Noun

heap (plural heaps)

  1. A crowd; a throng; a multitude or great number of people.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, An Advertisement touching an Holy War
      a heap of vassals and slaves
    • 1876, Anthony Trollope, s:Doctor Thorne
      He had plenty of friends, heaps of friends in the parliamentary sense
  2. A pile or mass; a collection of things laid in a body, or thrown together so as to form an elevation.
    • Huge heaps of slain around the body rise.
  3. A great number or large quantity of things.
    • 1679, Gilbert Burnet, The History of the Reformation of the Church of England
      a vast heap, both of places of scripture and quotations
    • 1878, Robert Louis Stevenson, s:Will o’ the Mill
      I have noticed a heap of things in my life.
  4. (computing) A data structure consisting of trees in which each node is greater than all its children.
  5. (computing) Memory that is dynamically allocated.
  6. (colloquial) A dilapidated place or vehicle.
    • 1991 May 12, “Kidnapped!” Jeeves and Wooster, Series 2, Episode 5:
      Chuffy: It’s on a knife edge at the moment, Bertie. If he can get planning permission, old Stoker’s going to take this heap off my hands in return for vast amounts of oof.
  7. (colloquial) A lot, a large amount

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:lot

Hyponyms

  • compost heap

Derived terms

  • heapful
  • heapmeal
  • it takes a heap of living to make a house a home

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: ipi

Translations

Verb

heap (third-person singular simple present heaps, present participle heaping, simple past and past participle heaped)

  1. (transitive) To pile in a heap.
  2. (transitive) To form or round into a heap, as in measuring.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act I, scene II, verses 40-42
      Cry a reward, to him who shall first bring
      News of that vanished Arabian,
      A full-heap’d helmet of the purest gold.
  3. (transitive) To supply in great quantity.
Synonyms
  • (pile in a heap): amass, heap up, pile up; see also Thesaurus:pile up

Derived terms

  • heap coals of fire on someone’s head
  • heaped (adj), heaping (adj)
  • heap up
  • overheap

Translations

Adverb

heap (not comparable)

  1. (offensive, representing broken English stereotypically or comically attributed to Native Americans) Very.
    • 1980, Joey Lee Dillard, Perspectives on American English (page 417)
      We are all familiar with the stereotyped broken English which writers of Western stories, comic strips, and similar literature put into the mouths of Indians: ‘me heap big chief’, ‘you like um fire water’, and so forth.
    • 2004, John Robert Colombo, The Penguin Book of Canadian Jokes (page 175)
      Once upon a time, a Scotsman, an Englishman, and an Irishman are captured by the Red Indians [] He approaches the Englishman, pinches the skin of his upper arm, and says, “Hmmm, heap good skin, nice and thick.

Anagrams

  • HAPE, HEPA, epha, hep A

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *haup, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz.

Cognate with Old Frisian hāp, Old Saxon hōp, Old High German houf. Old Norse hópr differs from the expected form *haupr because it is a borrowing from Middle Low German.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xæ͜ɑːp/, [hæ͜ɑːp]

Noun

hēap m

  1. group
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, “The Nativity of St. Paul the Apostle”
  2. heap

Declension

Derived terms

  • hēapmǣlum

Descendants

  • Middle English: heep
    • English: heap

Portuguese

Etymology

From English heap

Noun

heap m or f (in variation) (plural heaps)

  1. (computing) heap (tree-based data structure)

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian hāp, from Proto-West Germanic *haup, from Proto-Germanic *haupaz (heap).

Noun

heap c (plural heapen or heappen, diminutive heapke)

  1. heap, pile
  2. mass, gang, horde

Further reading

  • “heap”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Etymology

From Middle English siȝht, siȝt, siht, from Old English siht, sihþ (something seen; vision), from Proto-West Germanic *sihti, equivalent to see +‎ -th. Cognate with Scots sicht, Saterland Frisian Sicht, West Frisian sicht, Dutch zicht, German Low German Sicht, German Sicht, Danish sigte, Swedish sikte.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • enPR: sīt, IPA(key): /saɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Homophones: cite, site

Noun

sight (countable and uncountable, plural sights)

  1. (in the singular) The ability to see.
  2. The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view.
    • And when hee had spoken these things, while they beheld, hee was taken vp, and a cloud receiued him out of their sight.
  3. Something seen.
    • 2005, Lesley Brown (translator), Plato (author), Sophist, 236d:
      He’s a really remarkable man and it’s very hard to get him in one’s sights; []
  4. Something worth seeing; a spectacle, either good or bad.
    • And Moses saide, I will nowe turne aside, and see this great sight, why the bush is not burnt.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, Prothalamion
      They never saw a sight so fair.
  5. A device used in aiming a projectile, through which the person aiming looks at the intended target.
  6. A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained.
  7. (now colloquial) a great deal, a lot; frequently used to intensify a comparative.
    • A nombre of twenty sterres bright,
      Which is to sene a wonder sight
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 2
      “If your mother put you in the pit at twelve, it’s no reason why I should do the same with my lad.”
      “Twelve! It wor a sight afore that!”
  8. In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame, the open space, the opening.
  9. (obsolete) The instrument of seeing; the eye.
  10. Mental view; opinion; judgment.
    • That which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.

Synonyms

  • (ability to see): sense of sight, vision
  • (something seen): view
  • (aiming device): scope, peep sight

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

sight (third-person singular simple present sights, present participle sighting, simple past and past participle sighted)

  1. (transitive) To register visually.
  2. (transitive) To get sight of (something).
  3. (transitive) To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight.
  4. (transitive) To take aim at.

Synonyms

  • (visually register): see
  • (get sight of): espy, glimpse, spot
  • (take aim): aim at, take aim at

Derived terms

  • resight

Translations

See also

  • see
  • vision

Anagrams

  • ghits, thigs, tighs

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