hearsay vs rumor what difference

what is difference between hearsay and rumor

English

Etymology

From Middle English hyere-zigginge (1340), here sey (ca. 1438), from the phrase heren seien (to hear [people] say). Compare equally old Middle High German hœrsagen (14th c.), whence modern Hörensagen.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: hear‧say

Noun

hearsay (usually uncountable, plural hearsays)

  1. Information that was heard by one person about another that cannot be adequately substantiated.
  2. (law) Evidence based on the reports of others, which is normally inadmissible because it was not made under oath, rather than on personal knowledge.
  3. (law) An out-of-court statement offered in court for the truth of the matter asserted, which is normally inadmissible because it is not subject to cross-examination unless the hearsay statement falls under one of a number of exceptions.

Derived terms

  • double hearsay

Synonyms

  • common talk
  • gossip
  • report
  • rumor

Translations

See also

  • as they say
  • hear
  • hear tell
  • so they say
  • you know what they say

Further reading

  • hearsay in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • hearsay in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Alternative forms

  • rumour (Commonwealth)

Etymology

From Middle English rumour, from Old French rumeur, from Latin rūmor (common talk).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹuːmə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹumɚ/
  • Rhymes: -uːmə(r)

Noun

rumor (countable and uncountable, plural rumors)

  1. (American spelling, countable) A statement or claim of questionable accuracy, from no known reliable source, usually spread by word of mouth.
    There’s a rumor going round that he’s going to get married.
  2. (American spelling, uncountable) Information or misinformation of the kind contained in such claims.
    They say he used to be a thief, but that’s just rumor.

Synonyms

  • (piece of information):
  • (information): gossip, hearsay, talk, tittle-tattle

Hypernyms

  • information

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

rumor (third-person singular simple present rumors, present participle rumoring, simple past and past participle rumored)

  1. (transitive, usually used in the passive voice) To tell a rumor about; to gossip.
    John is rumored to be next in line for a promotion.

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin rumor, rumorem.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ruˈmo/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ruˈmoɾ/

Noun

rumor m (plural rumors)

  1. rumor

Related terms

  • rumorejar

Further reading

  • “rumor” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *roumōs, from Proto-Indo-European *rewH- (to shout, to roar).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈruː.mor/, [ˈɾuːmɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈru.mor/, [ˈruːmɔr]

Noun

rūmor m (genitive rūmōris); third declension

  1. rumor, hearsay
  2. rustle, murmur, a murmuring
  3. The voice of the people

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

References

  • rumor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • rumor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • rumor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • rumor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Polish

Etymology

From Latin rūmor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈru.mɔr/

Noun

rumor m inan

  1. uproar, hubbub, tumult, racket, din
    Synonyms: wrzawa, zamieszanie

Declension

Further reading

  • rumor in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • rumor in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin rumor, rumorem.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ʁuˈmo(ʁ)/
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ʁuˈmoɾ/
  • Hyphenation: ru‧mor

Noun

rumor m (plural rumores)

  1. rumour (statement or claim from no known reliable source)
  2. continuous noise
    • No confuso rumor que se formava, destacavam-se risos, sons de vozes que altercavam, sem se saber de onde, grasnar de marrecos, cantar de galos, cacarejar de galinhas.

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:rumor.


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin rumor, rumorem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ruˈmoɾ/, [ruˈmoɾ]
  • Hyphenation: ru‧mor

Noun

rumor m (plural rumores)

  1. rumor
  2. murmur

Related terms

  • rumorear

Further reading

  • “rumor” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

References


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