heat vs passion what difference

what is difference between heat and passion

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hēt, IPA(key): /hiːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /hit/, [çit]
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English hete, from Old English hǣte, hǣtu (heat, warmth; fervor, ardor), from Proto-Germanic *haitį̄ (heat), from Proto-Indo-European *kayd-, a derived form of *kay- (heat; hot).

Cognate with Scots hete (heat), North Frisian hiet (heat), Old High German heizī (heat). Related also to Dutch hitte (heat), German Hitze (heat), Swedish hetta (heat), Icelandic hiti (heat).

Noun

heat (countable and uncountable, plural heats)

  1. (uncountable) Thermal energy.
    • 2007, James Shipman, Jerry Wilson, Aaron Todd, An Introduction to Physical Science: Twelfth Edition, pages 106–108:
      Heat and temperature, although different, are intimately related. […] For example, suppose you added equal amounts of heat to equal masses of iron and aluminum. How do you think their temperatures would change? [] if the temperature of the iron increased by 100 C°, the corresponding temperature change in the aluminum would be only 48 C°.
  2. (uncountable) The condition or quality of being hot.
  3. (uncountable) An attribute of a spice that causes a burning sensation in the mouth.
  4. (uncountable) A period of intensity, particularly of emotion.
    Synonyms: passion, vehemence
  5. (uncountable) An undesirable amount of attention.
  6. (uncountable, slang) The police.
  7. (uncountable, slang) One or more firearms.
  8. (countable, baseball) A fastball.
  9. (uncountable) A condition where a mammal is aroused sexually or where it is especially fertile and therefore eager to mate.
  10. (countable) A preliminary race, used to determine the participants in a final race
  11. (countable) (by extension) A stage in a competition, not necessarily a sporting one; a round.
  12. (countable) One cycle of bringing metal to maximum temperature and working it until it is too cool to work further.
  13. (countable) A hot spell.
  14. (uncountable) Heating system; a system that raises the temperature of a room or building.
  15. (uncountable) The output of a heating system.
  16. (countable) A violent action unintermitted; a single effort.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English heten, from Old English hǣtan (to heat; become hot), from Proto-Germanic *haitijaną (to heat, make hot).

Verb

heat (third-person singular simple present heats, present participle heating, simple past and past participle heated or (dialectal) het)

  1. (transitive) To cause an increase in temperature of (an object or space); to cause to become hot (often with “up”).
    I’ll heat up the water.
  2. (intransitive) To become hotter.
    There’s a pot of soup heating on the stove.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To excite or make hot by action or emotion; to make feverish.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To excite ardour in; to rouse to action; to excite to excess; to inflame, as the passions.
  5. (transitive, slang) To arouse, to excite (sexually).
    The massage heated her up.
Derived terms
Synonyms
  • stoke
  • warm up
  • heat up; hot up, hot
Translations

Anagrams

  • Thea, eath, haet, hate, heta

Swedish

Etymology

From English heat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhiːt/
  • Homophone: hit

Noun

heat n

  1. (sports) A heat, a preliminary race, used to determine the participants in a final race

Declension

Anagrams

  • Thea, heta


English

Etymology

From Middle English passioun, passion, from Old French passion (and in part from Old English passion), from Latin passio (suffering), noun of action from perfect passive participle passus (suffered), from deponent verb patior (I suffer), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₁- (to hurt), see also Old English fēond (devil, enemy), Gothic ???????????????????? (faian, to blame).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: păsh’ən, IPA(key): /ˈpæʃən/
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈpʰæʃən]
  • Rhymes: -æʃən

Noun

passion (countable and uncountable, plural passions)

  1. Any great, strong, powerful emotion, especially romantic love or extreme hate.
  2. Fervor, determination.
  3. An object of passionate or romantic love or strong romantic interest.
  4. Sexual intercourse, especially when very emotional.
  5. (Christianity, usually capitalized) The suffering of Jesus leading up to and during his crucifixion.
  6. A display, musical composition, or play meant to commemorate the suffering of Jesus.
  7. (obsolete) Suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress.
  8. (obsolete) The state of being acted upon; subjection to an external agent or influence; a passive condition
    Antonym: action
  9. (obsolete) The capacity of being affected by external agents; susceptibility of impressions from external agents.
  10. (obsolete) An innate attribute, property, or quality of a thing.
  11. (obsolete) Disorder of the mind; madness.

Synonyms

  • (fervor, determination): ardor, fire in the belly, zeal

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

passion (third-person singular simple present passions, present participle passioning, simple past and past participle passioned)

  1. (obsolete) To suffer pain or sorrow; to experience a passion; to be extremely agitated.
    • she passioned
      To see herself escap’d from so sore ills
  2. (transitive) To give a passionate character to.

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “passion”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • Pasions, Spinosa, saposin

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɑsːion/, [ˈpɑs̠ːio̞n]
  • Rhymes: -ɑsːion
  • Syllabification: pas‧si‧on

Noun

passion

  1. Genitive singular form of passio.

French

Etymology

From Middle French passion, from Old French passion, borrowed from Latin passiō, ultimately from patior. Cognate with patience.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pa.sjɔ̃/

Noun

passion f (plural passions)

  1. (countable and uncountable) passion

Derived terms

  • fruit de la passion

Related terms

  • compassion
  • pâtir

Further reading

  • “passion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Noun

passion

  1. Alternative form of passioun

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French passion.

Noun

passion f (plural passions)

  1. passion

Descendants

  • French: passion

Old English

Alternative forms

  • passio

Etymology

From Latin passio (suffering), noun of action from perfect passive participle passus (suffered), from deponent verb pati (suffer).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɑs.si͜un/

Noun

passion f (nominative plural passione)

  1. passion of Christ

Descendants

  • >? Middle English: passioun

References

  • John R. Clark Hall (1916), “passion”, in A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York: Macmillan.
  • Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898), “passion”, in An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin passio, passionem.

Noun

passion f (oblique plural passions, nominative singular passion, nominative plural passions)

  1. passion (suffering)
    1. (specifically, Christianity) the ordeal endured by Jesus in order to absolve humanity of sin

Descendants

  • Middle French: passion
    • French: passion
  • Middle English: passioun, pascioun, passion, passione, passioune, passiun, passyon, passyoun, passyun
    • English: passion, Passion
    • Scots: passion, patient

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (passion)
  • passiun on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial