heave vs pant what difference

what is difference between heave and pant

English

Etymology

From Middle English heven, hebben, from Old English hebban, from Proto-West Germanic *habbjan, from Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to take up, lift), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂pyéti, from the root *keh₂p-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hiːv/
  • Rhymes: -iːv

Verb

heave (third-person singular simple present heaves, present participle heaving, simple past heaved or hove, past participle heaved or hove or hoven or heft)

  1. (transitive) To lift with difficulty; to raise with some effort; to lift (a heavy thing).
    We heaved the chest-of-drawers on to the second-floor landing.
  2. (transitive) To throw, cast.
    They heaved rocks into the pond.
    The cap’n hove the body overboard.
  3. (intransitive) To rise and fall.
    Her chest heaved with emotion.
    • Frequent for breath his panting bosom heaves.
  4. (transitive) To utter with effort.
    She heaved a sigh and stared out of the window.
  5. (transitive, nautical) To pull up with a rope or cable.
    Heave up the anchor there, boys!
  6. (transitive, archaic) To lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards (particularly in ships or vehicles) or forwards.
    • 1647, Robert Herrick, Noble Numbers
      Here a little child I stand, / Heaving up my either hand.
  7. (intransitive) To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.
    • 1751, Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
      where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap
    • 17 June, 1857, Edward Everett, The Statue of Warren
      the heaving sods of Bunker Hill
  8. (transitive, mining, geology) To displace (a vein, stratum).
  9. (transitive, now rare) To cause to swell or rise, especially in repeated exertions.
    The wind heaved the waves.
  10. (transitive, intransitive, nautical) To move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation.
    to heave the ship ahead
  11. (intransitive) To retch, to make an effort to vomit; to vomit.
    The smell of the old cheese was enough to make you heave.
  12. (intransitive) To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, a sermon, An Answer to some Considerations on the Spirit of Martin Luther, and the Original of the Reformation at Oxford
      She [The Church of England] had struggled and heaved at a reformation ever since Wickliff’s days.
  13. (obsolete, Britain, thieves’ cant) To rob; to steal from; to plunder.

Derived terms

  • heave in sight
  • heave to
  • overheave
  • two, six, heave or two six heave (see in Wikipedia)
  • upheave

Related terms

  • heavy
  • heft

Descendants

  • Danish: hive
  • Faroese: hiva
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: hiva, hive
  • Norwegian Bokmål: hive
  • Scanian: hyva
    Hallandian: hiva
  • Swedish: hiva
    Sudermannian: hyva
  • Westrobothnian: hyv

Translations

Noun

heave (plural heaves)

  1. An effort to raise something, such as a weight or one’s own body, or to move something heavy.
  2. An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, etc.
  3. A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode.
  4. (nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel goes up and down in a short period of time. Compare pitch.
  5. An effort to vomit; retching.
  6. (rare, only used attributively as in “heave line” or “heave horse”) Broken wind in horses.
  7. (cricket) A forceful shot in which the ball follows a high trajectory

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • hevea


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pănt, IPA(key): /pænt/
  • Rhymes: -ænt

Etymology 1

From Middle English panten, whence also English dialectal pank.

Possibly from Old French pantoyer, a byform or of Old French pantoisier (to be breathless) (compare modern French panteler (to gasp for breath)), of uncertain origin. Possibly from Vulgar Latin *pantasiō (struggling for breath when having a nightmare), from Ancient Greek φαντασιόω (phantasióō, I am subject to hallucinations), from φαντασία (phantasía, appearance, image, fantasy).

Noun

pant (plural pants)

  1. A quick breathing; a catching of the breath; a gasp.
  2. (figuratively) Eager longing.
    • 1995, John C. Leggett, Suzanne Malm, The Eighteen Stages of Love (page 9)
      Indeed, the projections, cravings, and everyday frolics common to trysts among buzz-activist Hollywood stars and starlets, plus their many common folk imitators, go forward with eager pant.
  3. (obsolete) A violent palpitation of the heart.
Translations
References
  • pant in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “pant”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Verb

pant (third-person singular simple present pants, present participle panting, simple past and past participle panted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To breathe quickly or in a labored manner, as after exertion or from eagerness or excitement; to respire with heaving of the breast; to gasp.
    • Pluto pants for breath from out his cell.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound
      There is a cavern where my spirit / Was panted forth in anguish.
  2. (intransitive) To long eagerly; to desire earnestly.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To long for (something); to be eager for (something).
    • 1633, George Herbert, Love
      Then shall our hearts pant thee.
  4. (intransitive) Of the heart, to beat with unnatural violence or rapidity; to palpitate.
  5. (intransitive) To sigh; to flutter; to languish.
  6. (intransitive) To heave, as the breast.
  7. (intransitive) To bulge and shrink successively, of iron hulls, etc.
Synonyms
  • (breathe quickly or in a labored manner): gasp
  • (long for): crave, desire, long for, pine for
  • (long eagerly): crave, desire, long, pine
  • (of the heart, to beat with unnatural violence): palpitate, pound, throb
Translations

Etymology 2

From pants

Noun

pant (plural pants)

  1. (fashion) A pair of pants (trousers or underpants).
  2. (used attributively as a modifier) Of or relating to pants.
    Pant leg
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Unknown

Noun

pant (plural pants)

  1. (Scotland and northeast England) Any public drinking fountain.

References

  • OED 2nd edition

Anagrams

  • APTN, NAPT, NPTA

Czech

Etymology

From German Band (band, belt)

Noun

pant m

  1. hinge

Danish

Noun

pant

  1. a deposit (on packaging such as bottles and cans)

Derived terms

  • dåsepant, flaskepant

See also

  • depositum (deposit on a rented home)

Middle English

Verb

pant

  1. Alternative form of panten

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German pant and Old Norse pantr

Noun

pant n (definite singular pantet, indefinite plural pant, definite plural panta or pantene)

  1. pawn (item sold to a pawn shop)
  2. a mortgage
  3. security (on a loan)
  4. a forfeit (in a game)
  5. a pledge

Related terms

  • pantelån
  • pantelåner
  • pantsette

Noun

pant m (definite singular panten, indefinite plural panter, definite plural pantene)

  1. a (refundable) deposit (e.g. on bottles)

References

  • “pant” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Low German pant and Old Norse pantr

Noun

pant n (definite singular pantet, indefinite plural pant, definite plural panta)

  1. pawn (item sold to a pawn shop)
  2. a mortgage
  3. security (on a loan)
  4. a forfeit (in a game)
  5. a pledge

Related terms

  • pantelån

Noun

pant m (definite singular panten, indefinite plural pantar, definite plural pantane)

  1. a (refundable) deposit (e.g. on bottles)

References

  • “pant” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From German Band via Austrian German.

Noun

pȁnt m (Cyrillic spelling па̏нт)

  1. hinge

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

From Middle Low German pant and Old Norse pantr

Noun

pant c

  1. pledge, item deposited at a pawnshop or otherwise given as a security
  2. container deposit, an addition to the price of an article returned when its container is returned to a collection point for re-use

Declension


Welsh

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *kwantyo- “flat hill”, compare Pictish ᚘᚐᚅᚈ (pant, hollow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pant/

Noun

pant m (plural pantiau)

  1. hollow, depression, small valley, dingle, dell

Mutation

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