heave vs puff what difference

what is difference between heave and puff

English

Etymology

From Middle English heven, hebben, from Old English hebban, from Proto-West Germanic *habbjan, from Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to take up, lift), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂pyéti, from the root *keh₂p-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hiːv/
  • Rhymes: -iːv

Verb

heave (third-person singular simple present heaves, present participle heaving, simple past heaved or hove, past participle heaved or hove or hoven or heft)

  1. (transitive) To lift with difficulty; to raise with some effort; to lift (a heavy thing).
    We heaved the chest-of-drawers on to the second-floor landing.
  2. (transitive) To throw, cast.
    They heaved rocks into the pond.
    The cap’n hove the body overboard.
  3. (intransitive) To rise and fall.
    Her chest heaved with emotion.
    • Frequent for breath his panting bosom heaves.
  4. (transitive) To utter with effort.
    She heaved a sigh and stared out of the window.
  5. (transitive, nautical) To pull up with a rope or cable.
    Heave up the anchor there, boys!
  6. (transitive, archaic) To lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards (particularly in ships or vehicles) or forwards.
    • 1647, Robert Herrick, Noble Numbers
      Here a little child I stand, / Heaving up my either hand.
  7. (intransitive) To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.
    • 1751, Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
      where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap
    • 17 June, 1857, Edward Everett, The Statue of Warren
      the heaving sods of Bunker Hill
  8. (transitive, mining, geology) To displace (a vein, stratum).
  9. (transitive, now rare) To cause to swell or rise, especially in repeated exertions.
    The wind heaved the waves.
  10. (transitive, intransitive, nautical) To move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation.
    to heave the ship ahead
  11. (intransitive) To retch, to make an effort to vomit; to vomit.
    The smell of the old cheese was enough to make you heave.
  12. (intransitive) To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, a sermon, An Answer to some Considerations on the Spirit of Martin Luther, and the Original of the Reformation at Oxford
      She [The Church of England] had struggled and heaved at a reformation ever since Wickliff’s days.
  13. (obsolete, Britain, thieves’ cant) To rob; to steal from; to plunder.

Derived terms

  • heave in sight
  • heave to
  • overheave
  • two, six, heave or two six heave (see in Wikipedia)
  • upheave

Related terms

  • heavy
  • heft

Descendants

  • Danish: hive
  • Faroese: hiva
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: hiva, hive
  • Norwegian Bokmål: hive
  • Scanian: hyva
    Hallandian: hiva
  • Swedish: hiva
    Sudermannian: hyva
  • Westrobothnian: hyv

Translations

Noun

heave (plural heaves)

  1. An effort to raise something, such as a weight or one’s own body, or to move something heavy.
  2. An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, etc.
  3. A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode.
  4. (nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel goes up and down in a short period of time. Compare pitch.
  5. An effort to vomit; retching.
  6. (rare, only used attributively as in “heave line” or “heave horse”) Broken wind in horses.
  7. (cricket) A forceful shot in which the ball follows a high trajectory

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • hevea


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʌf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf

Etymology 1

From Middle English puff, puf, from Old English pyf (a blast of wind, puff), imitative. Cognate with Middle Low German puf, pof.

Noun

puff (countable and uncountable, plural puffs)

  1. (countable) A sharp exhalation of a small amount of breath through the mouth.
  2. (uncountable) The ability to breathe easily while exerting oneself.
    Synonym: wind
  3. (countable) A small quantity of gas or smoke in the air.
  4. (countable) A sudden but small gust of wind, smoke, etc.
    • 1674, Thomas Flatman, Poems and Songs
      to every puff of wind a slave
  5. (informal, countable) An act of inhaling smoke from a cigarette, cigar or pipe.
    Synonym: drag
  6. (uncountable, slang) The drug cannabis.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  7. (countable) A flamboyant or alluring statement of praise.
    • 1902, Robert Marshall Grade, The Haunted Major
      [] though I care not one straw for the personal puffs of which I myself am so often the subject []
    • 1931, Bernard Shaw, Our Theatre in the Nineties (volume 24, page 246)
      [] we critics were not his fellow-guests, but simply deadheads whose business it was to “dress the house” and write puffs.
  8. A portion of fabric gathered up so as to be left full in the middle.
    a sleeve with a puff at the shoulder
  9. (countable) A light cake filled with cream, cream cheese, etc.
    Synonyms: pastry, cream puff
  10. A puffball.
    • 1598, John Florio, A Worlde of Wordes, or Most Copious, and Exact Dictionarie in Italian and English, London: Edward Blount, p. 47,[1]
      Bozzacchio, an acorne. Also a puffe or mushrump full of dust.
  11. A powder puff.
  12. (dated, slang) A puffer, one who is employed by the owner or seller of goods sold at auction to bid up the price; an act or scam of that type.
    • 1842, “A Paper on Puffing”, Ainsworth’s Magazine
      Is nothing to be said in praise of the “Emporiums” and “Repositories” and “Divans,” which formerly were mere insignificant tailors’, toymen’s, and tobacconists’ shops? Is the transition from the barber’s pole to the revolving bust of the perruquier, nothing? — the leap from the bare counter-traversed shop to the carpeted and mirrored saloon of trade, nothing? Are they not, one and all, practical puffs, intended to invest commerce with elegance, and to throw a halo round extravagance?
    • 1848, Mrs. White, “Puffs and Puffing”, in Sharpe’s London Magazine
      Here the duke is made the vehicle of the tailor’s advertisement, and the prelusive compliments, ostensibly meant for his grace, merge into a covert recommendation of the coat. Several specimens might be given of this species of puff, which is to be met with in almost every paper, and is a favourite form with booksellers, professional men, &c.
    • 2008, David Paton-Williamspage, Katterfelto, page xii
      He was the eighteenth century king of spin, or, in the language of the day, the “prince of puff“.
  13. (genetics) A region of a chromosome exhibiting a local increase in diameter.
  14. (slang, dated, Britain) Life.
    • 1938, P. G. Wodehouse, The Code of the Woosters
      Did you ever in your puff see such a perfect perisher?
  15. (derogatory, slang, Britain, particularly northern UK) Synonym of poof: a male homosexual, especially an effeminate one.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English puffen, from Old English pyffan (to breathe out, blow with the mouth). Compare Dutch puffen, German Low German puffen, German puffen, Danish puffe, Swedish puffa.

Verb

puff (third-person singular simple present puffs, present participle puffing, simple past and past participle puffed)

  1. (intransitive) To emit smoke, gas, etc., in puffs.
  2. (intransitive) To pant.
    • 1692, Roger L’Estrange, Fables of Aesop and Other Eminent Mythologists
      By and by comes the ass back again, Puffing and Blowing, from the Chase.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VI
      Puffing and panting, we plodded on until within about a mile of the harbor we came upon a sight that brought us all up standing.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To advertise.
  4. To blow as an expression of scorn.
    • It is really to defy Heaven to puff at damnation.
  5. To swell with air; to be dilated or inflated.
    • 1690, Robert Boyle, The Christian Virtuoso
      ’tis easy for a man to have a great opinion of his own knowledge , and be puff’d up by it
  6. To breathe in a swelling, inflated, or pompous manner; hence, to assume importance.
    • 1633, George Herbert, The Quip
      Then came brave Glory puffing by.
  7. To drive with a puff, or with puffs.
    • The clearing north will puff the clouds away.
  8. To repel with words; to blow at contemptuously.
    • 1685, John Dryden, The Twenty-Ninth Ode of the First Book of Horace
      I puff the prostitute away.
  9. To cause to swell or dilate; to inflate.
    a bladder puffed with air
  10. To inflate with pride, flattery, self-esteem, etc.; often with up.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett, Thucydides Translated into English
      puffed up with military success
  11. To praise with exaggeration; to flatter; to call public attention to by praises; to praise unduly.
Derived terms
  • outpuff
  • puffed
  • puff up
  • puff out
Translations

Finnish

Interjection

puff

  1. poof (deflating object or a magical disappearance)

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpufː]
  • Hyphenation: puff
  • Rhymes: -ufː

Etymology 1

From German puffen.

Noun

puff (plural puffok)

  1. pouf, puff, pouffe (a backless, rounded, cushioned low stool)
  2. (dressmaking) pouf (on the upper part of the sleeves)
  3. puff, powder puff (a pad of soft material used for the application of cosmetic powder to the face)
Declension

Etymology 2

Back-formation from puffad, puffant, puffaszt.

Interjection

puff

  1. bang! pouf! (onomatopoeia representing a sudden sharp noise or crashing sound)

References

Further reading

  • (pouf, puff, pouffe): puff in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (bang): puff in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

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