heavy vs sound what difference

what is difference between heavy and sound

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English hevy, heviȝ, from Old English hefiġ, hefeġ, hæfiġ (heavy; important, grave, severe, serious; oppressive, grievous; slow, dull), from Proto-West Germanic *habīg (heavy, hefty, weighty), from Proto-Germanic *habīgaz (heavy, hefty, weighty), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂p- (to take, grasp, hold).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hevʹi
  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈhɛ.vi/
  • (General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ˈhe.vi/
  • Rhymes: -ɛvi

Adjective

heavy (comparative heavier, superlative heaviest)

  1. (of a physical object) Having great weight.
  2. (of a topic) Serious, somber.
  3. Not easy to bear; burdensome; oppressive.
    • The hand of the Lord was heavy upon them of Ashdod.
    • 1814, William Wordsworth, The Excursion
      Sent hither by my Husband to impart the heavy news.
  4. (Britain, slang, dated) Good.
  5. (dated, late 1960s, 1970s, US) Profound.
  6. (of a rate of flow) High, great.
    • 1998, Stanley George Clayton, “”Menstruation” in Encyclopedia Britannica
      The ovarian response to gonadotropic hormones may be erratic at first, so that irregular or heavy bleeding sometimes occurs
  7. (slang) Armed.
  8. (music) Louder, more distorted.
  9. (of weather) Hot and humid.
  10. (of a person) Doing the specified activity more intensely than most other people.
  11. (of food) High in fat or protein; difficult to digest.
  12. Of great force, power, or intensity; deep or intense.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter IV
      The surf was not heavy, and there was no undertow, so we made shore easily, effecting an equally easy landing.
  13. Laden to a great extent.
  14. Laden with that which is weighty; encumbered; burdened; bowed down, either with an actual burden, or with grief, pain, disappointment, etc.
    • 1613, William Browne, Britannia’s Pastorals
      Seating himselfe within a darkesome cave, / (Such places heavy Saturnists doe crave,) / Where yet the gladsome day was never seene []
  15. Slow; sluggish; inactive; or lifeless, dull, inanimate, stupid.
    • a heavy, dull, degenerate mind
    • Neither [is] his ear heavy, that it cannot hear.
  16. Impeding motion; cloggy; clayey.
    a heavy road; a heavy soil
  17. Not raised or leavened.
  18. (of wines or spirits) Having much body or strength.
  19. (obsolete) With child; pregnant.
  20. (physics) Containing one or more isotopes that are heavier than the normal one.
  21. (petroleum) Having high viscosity.
Synonyms
  • sweer/swear
Antonyms
  • light
Derived terms

Pages starting with “heavy”.

Related terms
  • heave
  • heft
Translations

Adverb

heavy (comparative more heavy, superlative most heavy)

  1. In a heavy manner; weightily; heavily; gravely.
    heavy laden with their sins
  2. (colloquial, nonstandard) To a great degree; greatly.
  3. (India, colloquial) very
Derived terms
  • hang heavy
  • heavy-laden

Noun

heavy (plural heavies or heavys)

  1. A villain or bad guy; the one responsible for evil or aggressive acts.
    With his wrinkled, uneven face, the actor always seemed to play the heavy in films.
  2. (slang) A doorman, bouncer or bodyguard.
    A fight started outside the bar but the heavies came out and stopped it.
  3. (journalism, slang, chiefly in the plural) A newspaper of the quality press.
    • 1973, Allen Hutt, The changing newspaper (page 151)
      The comment may be offered here that the ‘heavies’ have been the Design Award’s principal scorers, both in the overall bronze plaque days and, since, in the Daily/Sunday Class 1.
    • 2006, Richard Keeble, The Newspapers Handbook
      Reviewers in the heavies aim to impress with the depth of their knowledge and appreciation.
  4. (Should we move, merge or split(+) this sense?) (aviation) A large multi-engined aircraft. (The term heavy normally follows the call-sign when used by air traffic controllers.)
Derived terms
  • brain heavy
  • dog heavy
Translations

Verb

heavy (third-person singular simple present heavies, present participle heavying, simple past and past participle heavied)

  1. (often with “up”) To make heavier. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. To sadden. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (Australia, New Zealand, informal) To use power or wealth to exert influence on, e.g., governments or corporations; to pressure.
    The union was well known for the methods it used to heavy many businesses.
    • 1985, Australian House of Representatives, House of Representatives Weekly Hansard, Issue 11, Part 1, page 1570,
      [] the Prime Minister sought to evade the simple fact that he heavied Mr Reid to get rid of Dr Armstrong.
    • 2001, Finola Moorhead, Darkness More Visible, Spinifex Press, Australia, page 557,
      But he is on the wrong horse, heavying me. My phone′s tapped. Well, he won′t find anything.
    • 2005, David Clune, Ken Turner (editors), The Premiers of New South Wales, 1856-2005, Volume 3: 1901-2005, page 421,
      But the next two days of the Conference also produced some very visible lobbying for the succession and apparent heavying of contenders like Brereton, Anderson and Mulock – much of it caught on television.

Etymology 2

heave +‎ -y

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhiːvi/

Adjective

heavy (comparative more heavy, superlative most heavy)

  1. Having the heaves.
    a heavy horse

See also

  • heavy cake

References

  • heavy at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Havey, Yahve

German

Etymology

From English heavy.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛvi/

Adjective

heavy (not comparable)

  1. (predicative, colloquial, probably slightly dated) heavy; intense; serious; shocking (extraordinary, especially in a bad way)
    Synonyms: heftig, krass, nicht ohne, ein starkes Stück

Spanish

Etymology

From English heavy (metal).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxebi/, [ˈxe.β̞i]

Adjective

heavy (plural heavys)

  1. heavy (pertaining to heavy metal)
  2. heavy (intense)
  3. (Dominican Republic, informal) cool


English

Alternative forms

  • soune, sownd, sowne (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /saʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English sound, sund, isund, ȝesund, from Old English sund, ġesund (sound, safe, whole, uninjured, healthy, prosperous), from Proto-Germanic *gasundaz, *sundaz (healthy), from Proto-Indo-European *sunt-, *swent- (vigorous, active, healthy).

Cognate with Scots sound, soun (healthy, sound), Saterland Frisian suund, gesuund (healthy), West Frisian sûn (healthy), Dutch gezond (healthy, sound), Low German sund, gesund (healthy), German gesund (healthy, sound), Danish sund (healthy), Swedish sund (sound, healthy). Related also to Dutch gezwind (fast, quick), German geschwind (fast, quick), Old English swīþ (strong, mighty, powerful, active, severe, violent). See swith.

Adjective

sound (comparative sounder, superlative soundest)

  1. Healthy.
  2. Complete, solid, or secure.
  3. (mathematics, logic) Having the property of soundness.
    Hypernym: valid
  4. (Britain, slang) Good; acceptable; decent.
  5. (of sleep) Quiet and deep.
  6. Heavy; laid on with force.
  7. Founded in law; legal; valid; not defective.
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

sound (comparative more sound, superlative most sound)

  1. Soundly.

Interjection

sound

  1. (Britain, slang) Yes; used to show agreement or understanding, generally without much enthusiasm.

Etymology 2

  • Noun: from Middle English sownde, alteration of soun, borrowed from Anglo-Norman sun, soun, Old French son, from accusative of Latin sonus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swenh₂- (to sound, resound).
  • Verb: from Middle English sownden, sounen, borrowed from Anglo-Norman suner, sounder, Old French soner (modern sonner), from Latin sonō.
  • The hypercorrect -d appears in the fifteenth century.

Displaced native Middle English swei, from Old English swēġ, from Proto-Germanic *swōgiz.

Noun

sound (countable and uncountable, plural sounds)

  1. A sensation perceived by the ear caused by the vibration of air or some other medium.
  2. A vibration capable of causing such sensations.
    • It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. []. He halted opposite the Privy Gardens, and, with his face turned skywards, listened until the sound of the Tower guns smote again on the ear and dispelled his doubts.
  3. (music) A distinctive style and sonority of a particular musician, orchestra etc
  4. Noise without meaning; empty noise.
  5. Earshot, distance within which a certain noise may be heard.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:sound
Descendants
  • Japanese: サウンド (saundo)
Translations
See also
  • audible

Verb

sound (third-person singular simple present sounds, present participle sounding, simple past and past participle sounded)

  1. (intransitive) To produce a sound.
  2. (copulative) To convey an impression by one’s sound.
  3. (intransitive) To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound.
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To resound.
  5. (intransitive, law, often with in) To arise or to be recognizable as arising in or from a particular area of law, or as likely to result in a particular kind of legal remedy.
  6. (transitive) To cause to produce a sound.
  7. (transitive, phonetics, of a vowel or consonant) To pronounce.
Synonyms
  • (to make noise): echo, reecho, resonate
  • See also Thesaurus:sound
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English sound, sund, from Old English sund (the power, capacity, or act of swimming; swimming; sea; ocean; water; sound; strait; channel), from Proto-Germanic *sundą (swimming; sound), from Proto-Indo-European *swem- (swimming; sea). Cognate with Dutch sond (sound; strait), Danish sund (sound; strait; channel), Swedish sund (sound; strait; channel), Icelandic sund (sound; strait; channel). Related to swim.

Noun

sound (plural sounds)

  1. (geography) A long narrow inlet, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait connecting two seas, or connecting a sea or lake with the ocean.
    • The Sound of Denmarke, where ships pay toll.
  2. The air bladder of a fish.
  3. A cuttlefish.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English sounden, from Old French sonder, from sonde (sounding line) of Germanic origin, compare Old English sundgyrd (a sounding rod), sundline (a sounding line), Old English sund (water, sea). More at Etymology 3 above.

Verb

sound (third-person singular simple present sounds, present participle sounding, simple past and past participle sounded)

  1. (intransitive) Dive downwards, used of a whale.
  2. To ascertain, or try to ascertain, the thoughts, motives, and purposes of (a person); to examine; to try; to test; to probe.
    When I sounded him, he appeared to favor the proposed deal.
    • 1665, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour
      I was in jest, / And by that offer meant to sound your breast.
    • I’ve sounded my Numidians man by man.
  3. Test; ascertain the depth of water with a sounding line or other device.
  4. (medicine) To examine with the instrument called a sound or sonde, or by auscultation or percussion.
Translations

Noun

sound (plural sounds)

  1. A long, thin probe for sounding or dilating body cavities or canals such as the urethra; a sonde.
Translations

References

  • sound at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • sound in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • nodus, udons, undos

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English sound.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsawnd/

Noun

sound m (invariable)

  1. (music) sound (distinctive style and sonority)

References

Anagrams

  • snudo, snudò

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