hefty vs muscular what difference

what is difference between hefty and muscular

English

Etymology

19th century. From heft (weight) +‎ -y.

The similarity with German heftig (vigorous, violent, intense) is apparently coincidental. From the German are Dutch, Danish, Norwegian heftig, Swedish häftig.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛfti/

Adjective

hefty (comparative heftier, superlative heftiest)

  1. Heavy, strong, vigorous, mighty, impressive.
    He can throw a hefty punch.
    • 1934, Frank Richards, The Magnet, Kidnapped from the Air
      The Remove dormitory echoed to the old, familiar sound of Bunter’s hefty snore.
  2. Strong; bulky.
    They use some hefty bolts to hold up road signs.
  3. (of a person) Possessing physical strength and weight; rugged and powerful; powerfully or heavily built.
    He was a tall, hefty man.
  4. Heavy, weighing a lot.
    She carries a hefty backpack full of books.
  5. (colloquial, of a number or amount) Large.
    That’s going to cost you a hefty sum.

Usage notes

  • Nouns to which “hefty” is often applied: price tag, premium, profit, price, penalty, fine, portion, salary, gain, increase, amount, sum, check, fee.

Translations



English

Etymology

Late 17th century from musculous +‎ -ar.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈmʌ.skjʊl.ə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmʌ.skjəl.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌskjʊlə(ɹ)

Adjective

muscular (comparative more muscular, superlative most muscular)

  1. (relational) Of, relating to, or connected with muscles.
  2. Brawny, thewy, having strength.
    Synonyms: athletic, beefy, brawny, husky, lusty, muscled, muscly, powerful, strapping, strong
  3. Having large, well-developed muscles.
    Synonyms: beefy, brawny, buff, husky, musclebound, muscled, muscly, powerfully built, swole, well-built
  4. (figuratively) Robust, strong.
    Synonym: vigorous
  5. Full-bodied

Derived terms

Related terms

  • musculature
  • musculo-

Translations

See also

  • myo-

References

  • “muscular”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “muscular”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin or New Latin mūsculāris

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /mus.kuˈla/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /mus.kuˈlaɾ/
  • Rhymes: -aɾ

Adjective

muscular (masculine and feminine plural musculars)

  1. muscular (of, relating to, or connected with muscles)

Related terms

  • múscul

Further reading

  • “muscular” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “muscular” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “muscular” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “muscular” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

Adjective

muscular m or f (plural musculares)

  1. muscular (of, relating to, or connected with muscles)

Related terms

  • músculo

Further reading

  • “muscular” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Interlingua

Adjective

muscular (not comparable)

  1. muscular

Related terms

  • musculo

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin or New Latin mūsculāris

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /muʃ.ku.ˈlaɾ/
  • Hyphenation: mus‧cu‧lar

Adjective

muscular m or f (plural musculares, comparable)

  1. muscular (of or relating to muscles)

Related terms

  • músculo

Romanian

Etymology

From French musculaire

Adjective

muscular m or n (feminine singular musculară, masculine plural musculari, feminine and neuter plural musculare)

  1. muscular

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin or New Latin mūsculāris

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /muskuˈlaɾ/, [mus.kuˈlaɾ]

Adjective

muscular (plural musculares)

  1. muscular (of, relating to, or connected with muscles)

Derived terms

  • distrofia muscular
  • fortalecimiento muscular
  • perimuscular
  • tono muscular

Related terms

  • músculo

Further reading

  • “muscular” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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