helpless vs lost what difference

what is difference between helpless and lost

English

Etymology

From Middle English helples, from Old English *helplēas (helpless) from Proto-Germanic *helpōlausaz, equivalent to help +‎ -less. Compare Dutch hulpeloos (helpless), German hilflos (helpless), Swedish hjälplös (helpless).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛlplɪs/
  • Hyphenation: help‧less

Adjective

helpless (comparative more helpless, superlative most helpless)

  1. Unable to defend oneself.
    • 1995, Bryan Adams, Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman?
      Then when you find yourself lyin’ helpless in her arms
      You know you really love a woman
  2. Lacking help; powerless.
  3. Unable to act without help; needing help; feeble.
  4. Uncontrollable.
    a helpless urge
  5. (obsolete) From which there is no possibility of being saved.
    • For, while they fly that gulf’s devouring jawes,
      They on the rock are rent and sunck in helplesse wawes.

Derived terms

  • helplessly
  • helplessness

Translations

Further reading

  • helpless in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • helpless in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Alternative forms

  • los’
  • loss

Etymology

From Middle English loste, losede (preterite) and Middle English lost, ilost, ilosed (past participle), from Old English losode (preterite) and Old English losod, ġelosod, equivalent to lose +‎ -t.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: lŏst, IPA(key): /lɒst/
  • (UK, dated) enPR: lôst, IPA(key): /lɔːst/
  • (US) enPR: lôst, IPA(key): /lɔst/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: läst, IPA(key): /lɑst/
  • Rhymes: -ɒst, -ɔːst

Verb

lost

  1. simple past tense and past participle of lose

Derived terms

  • long-lost
  • no love lost

Adjective

lost (comparative loster or more lost, superlative lostest or most lost)

  1. Having wandered from, or unable to find, the way.
    The children were soon lost in the forest.
  2. In an unknown location; unable to be found.
    Deep beneath the ocean, the Titanic was lost to the world.
  3. Not perceptible to the senses; no longer visible.
    an island lost in a fog; a person lost in a crowd
  4. Parted with; no longer held or possessed.
    a lost limb; lost honour
  5. Not employed or enjoyed; thrown away; employed ineffectually; wasted; squandered.
    a lost day; a lost opportunity or benefit
  6. Ruined or destroyed, either physically or morally; past help or hope.
    a ship lost at sea; a woman lost to virtue; a lost soul
  7. Hardened beyond sensibility or recovery; alienated; insensible.
    lost to shame; lost to all sense of honour
  8. Occupied with, or under the influence of, something, so as not to notice external things.
    to be lost in thought

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • LTOs, OSLT, OTLs, STOL, lots, slot, tols

Breton

Etymology

Cognate with Welsh llost, Cornish lost, Gaulish losto-, from Proto-Celtic *lustā, from the Proto-Indo-European root *leu- “to divide, to split”, possibly related to Old Norse ljósta (to strike), Proto-Germanic *leustaną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɔst]

Noun

lost m (plural lostoù)

  1. A tail.
  2. (informal) a cock, a penis.
    Ha ma lost bras ‘zo bet troc’het

    And my big penis was cut off (from a Breton bawdy song)

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔst

Verb

lost

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of lossen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of lossen

Adjective

lost

  1. Superlative form of los

Anagrams

  • slot, stol

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːst/

Verb

lost

  1. inflection of losen:
    1. second/third-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial